This table was made using three damaged propellers from a North American T-28 Trojan – they were almost certainly damaged from a belly landing that caused the spinning propellers to be bent backwards by contact with the runway.

The North American T-28 Trojan is a military aircraft used by the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy beginning in the 1950s, mostly for pilot training however they were also used during the Vietnam War in roles including counter-insurgency, reconnaissance, search and rescue, and forward air controller roles.

They were also used by the CIA in the former Belgian Congo during the 1960s, and they were put into operational military service by a number of other air forces (and rebel groups) throughout the 1960s and all the way up until the 1989 Philippine coup attempt where they were used as dive bombers.

U.S. Navy North American T-28B Trojan

Above Image: A U.S. Navy North American T-28B Trojan pictured in flight near Naval Air Station Whiting Field, Florida circa 1973. Image courtesy of the U.S. Navy National Museum of Naval Aviation.

The T-28 Trojan is a low wing, all-metal aircraft powered by a Wright R-1820-86 Cyclone 9-cylinder, air-cooled radial engine producing 1,425 hp in T-28D specification. The maximum speed of the aircraft is 343 mph (552 km/h, 298 kn) and it has a 35,500 ft (10,800 m) service ceiling, a rate of climb of 3,540 ft/min (18.0 m/s), and a range of 1,060 miles (1,710 kms).

The glass-topped table you see here is has legs made from the aluminum propeller blades from a T-28, as mentioned above the damage almost certainly came from a belly landing which was likely caused by a full landing gear failure or a nose wheel collapse.

The team who built the table used a clever system of alloy discs under the base of each propeller to get the height perfect and ensure that the glass top is level. The aluminum base has wheels and the table comes with correctly sized chairs.

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Above Film: A U.S. Navy training film for North American T-28 Trojan pilots.

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Ben Branch has had his work featured on CNN, Popular Mechanics, the official Smithsonian Magazine, Road & Track Magazine, the official Pinterest blog, the official eBay Motors blog, BuzzFeed, and many more.

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