Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Mon, 27 Jan 2020 10:44:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 Project Car: A Rare, Crashed BMW 503 That’s Been Stored For 44 Years https://silodrome.com/bmw-503-car/ Mon, 27 Jan 2020 10:30:39 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102502 The BMW 503 is a rare car – it’s rarer still to find one that hasn’t been restored to show condition due to the fact their values are rapidly approaching half a million US dollars apiece. The BMW 503 and its stablemate the 507 very nearly killed BMW off before the 1960s began, both of...

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The BMW 503 is a rare car – it’s rarer still to find one that hasn’t been restored to show condition due to the fact their values are rapidly approaching half a million US dollars apiece.

The BMW 503 and its stablemate the 507 very nearly killed BMW off before the 1960s began, both of the cars had been intended to bring in much needed capital from the USA but both were expensive to produce, they had high MSRPs, and they sold in very low numbers.

The BMW 503 And The Near Bankruptcy Of BMW

The appearance of the Mercedes-Benz 300SL in 1954 and it’s little brother the 190SL in 1955 had shown the executives at BMW that there was a global demand for high-end German luxury GT cars. Only 10 years had passed since the end of WWII but Mercedes had shown that the world was ready to spend significant money on good German cars, and BMW was listening.

Famed Austrian-American auto importer Max Hoffman was talking to BMW at the same time, asking for a car that he could sell between the high-end 300SL and the more affordable sports cars coming out of Britain from companies like MG and Triumph. He told BMW that if they could build a luxury sports GT car with a price of 12,000 Deutschmarks he would order thousands of them and sell them to the Americans.

BMW 503 Front

Hoffman also suggested a designer for this new car, Raymond Loewy protege Albrecht von Goertz. BMW hired von Goertz on this recommendation and it proved a good decision, he designed one of the most beautiful cars of the decade, even attracting praise from legendary Italian auto designer Battista “Pinin” Farina.

BMW worked to have as much of their new GT car built using parts that were already in production in order to keep costs down. This was a good strategy but it failed in the case of the 503, and costs quickly spiralled upwards. Engineer Fritz Fiedler repurposed the chassis and running gear of the BMW 502 as the starting point for the 503, the elegant body designed by von Goertz gave the car an entirely unique appearance that’s still winning it new fans today, and it’s powered by a modified version of the 3.2 litre all-alloy V8 from the 502.

This V8 was designed by Alfred Böning, it initially had a capacity of 2.6 litres and it was first used in a car in the BMW 501 of 1954. The V8 was specifically chosen to appeal to the average American buyer, the love affair between V8s and Americans was well known even then.

For use in the 503 the 3.2 litre V8 was fitted with twin Zenith carburettors, an improved lubrication system using a chain-driven oil pump, and it had a compression ratio of 7.5:1. This engine was capable of 140 bhp at 4,800 rpm, it could push the 503 from 0-60 mph in 13 seconds, and on to a top speed of 115 mph.

Although Hoffman had specified a price of 12,000 Deutschmarks the 503 would go on sale for 29,500 Deutschmarks, a price far too high for most buyers and well above the planned midway point between Triumph/MG and Mercedes. The cars sold very slowly, and in rather low numbers. From the start of production in 1956 to the end in 1959 BMW sold just 413 of them, 139 of which were convertibles (cabriolets).

BMW 503 Engine

The 503 and its sibling the 507 very nearly bankrupted BMW, they both had remarkably beautiful designs and excellent engineering, but cost overruns resulted in them both having MSRPs far too high. Fortunately BMW didn’t collapse, and a few years later in the mid-1960s Hoffman would once again give BMW an idea for a new car, it would result in the creation of the BMW 2002 – one of the most important models in the company’s history.

The Crashed BMW 503 Project Car Shown Here

The crash damaged BMW 503 you see here was bought new in Belgium from the Brussels BMW dealer SR Garage on September 22, 1959. It’s actually a 1958 model, and it had spent a year on the showroom floor at a Berlin dealership without finding a buyer – possibly due to the high price.

This is from the second series of 503 production, so it’s fitted with the (much preferred) floor shift transmission rather than the earlier column shift. The car also has an electrically operated top and windows – the first German car to come with them.

It would be the second owner, a Belgian doctor of Beveren, who had the front-end collision in 1976. The car has been in storage since then and remains remarkably original over all. Artcurial estimate that it’ll sell for between €70,000 and €110,000 when it’s crosses the auction block on the 7th of February, this is markedly below the €400,000+ value that many restored examples sell for, so it may represent a good deal to the right buyer.

If you’d like to read more about the car or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

BMW 503 V8 Engine

BMW 503 Tool Kit

BMW 503 Side

BMW 503 Seats

BMW 503 Rear

BMW 503 Interior

BMW 503 Grille

BMW 503 Doors

BMW 503 Front

BMW 503 Back

BMW 503 Back Seat

BMW 503 Back 2

Images courtesy of Artcurial

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Short Film: Porsche 911 RSR By Rennsport: Sublime Or Sacrilege? https://silodrome.com/porsche-911-rsr-by-rennsport/ Sun, 26 Jan 2020 06:42:57 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102746 Porsche 911 RSR By Rennsport: Sublime Or Sacrilege? is short film by Darryl Sleath of Carfection that takes a look inside one of the most remarkable Porsche 911 specialist companies in the world – 911 Rennsport. The company was founded by Paul and Keith Cockell and it’s based in the Cotswolds, one of the most...

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Porsche 911 RSR By Rennsport: Sublime Or Sacrilege? is short film by Darryl Sleath of Carfection that takes a look inside one of the most remarkable Porsche 911 specialist companies in the world – 911 Rennsport.

The company was founded by Paul and Keith Cockell and it’s based in the Cotswolds, one of the most beautiful parts of England and a region with an almost innumerable number of excellent driving roads winding through some of the greenest rolling hills on earth.

The core mission of 911 Rennsport is to build some of the finest 911s in the world, they specialise in creating their own take on the iconic Porsche 911 RSR – one of the most famous homologation sports cars in history and for good reason.

This short film gives a look inside 911 Rennsport, Darryl talks to Paul Cockrell about the company and cars, and then does some driving to give you a feel for what the cars are actually like.

If you’d like to visit 911 Rennsport you can click here to visit the website. You can click here if you’d like to visit Motorpunk, Darryl Sleath’s website, and you can click here to visit the main Carfection YouTube page – don’t forget to subscribe while you’re there!

911 Rennsport Porsche

911 Rennsport Porsche 3

911 Rennsport Porsche 2

911 Rennsport Porsche 1

911 Rennsport Porsche 4

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A Brief History of the Mazda RX-7 – Everything You Need To Know https://silodrome.com/mazda-rx-7-history/ Sat, 25 Jan 2020 10:30:07 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=96079 The Mazda RX-7 – An Introduction The Mazda RX-7 was the result of Toyo Kogyo Corporation’s high risk strategy of embracing the new and unproved Wankel engine technology with which to carve out a profile for themselves as a new technology innovator. Three automobile makers attempted this, NSU of Germany, Citroën of France, and Mazda...

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The Mazda RX-7 – An Introduction

The Mazda RX-7 was the result of Toyo Kogyo Corporation’s high risk strategy of embracing the new and unproved Wankel engine technology with which to carve out a profile for themselves as a new technology innovator. Three automobile makers attempted this, NSU of Germany, Citroën of France, and Mazda of Japan. Of the three, the effort to bring Felix Wankel’s rotary engine up to regular production reliability broke NSU, almost broke Citroën, and proved to be the making of Mazda.

The single most critical technological hurdle in transforming the Wankel engine from an unreliable prototype into a dependable production engine was finding the solution to the rotor edge seal problem. Mazda’s engineers were the ones who hit upon the solution to the problem with the creation of their carbon-aluminum seals that ended the problem of rotor edge chatter which gouged the interior of the engine’s housing.

With their version of the Wankel engine viable for production Mazda needed a suitable “vehicle” in which to showcase it. NSU had made the mistake of bringing their Wankel engine into production before they had attained the sort of technological advances that Mazda had, and they compounded it by installing their engine in a rather ordinary sedan car, the NSU Ro80, and in doing so failed to showcase the technology in a remarkable way. The result of this was that buyers of boringly ordinary sedan cars bought cars with boringly ordinary piston engines: there was no incentive for them to gamble on a sedan with untried new technology.

Mazda-Cosmo-Brochure-2

Mazda on the other hand decided to do what British car maker Jaguar had done when they first introduced their new DOHC XK engine after the Second World War: they installed it in a beautiful and exotic sports car, the Jaguar XK120. In 1961 Jaguar did it again, with that same XK engine, in the Jaguar E-Type.

So Mazda decided that they would showcase their Wankel rotary engine in a “space age” sports car, and that car was the Mazda Cosmo, first shown in 1964 at the Tokyo Motor Show but which was not allowed into regular production until May 30th, 1967, by which time it had been debugged with Japanese attention to detail.

The Mazda Cosmo was to be the company’s “halo car” and one of the strategies Mazda used to prove its reliability and speed was to enter two mildly modified Cosmo’s in the 84 hour Marathon de la Route at the famous Nürburgring race circuit in Germany. One car suffered an axle failure in the 82nd hour while the other completed the course and took a creditable fourth place. Mazda had proved the Wankel engine to be a great sports car engine and this led to them installing them in performance oriented cars.

The Mazda Cosmo remained in limited production until 1972 while Mazda also installed a Wankel engine in their small lightweight RX-3 Savannah coupe and it was campaigned in motor racing with great success. The RX-3 was a quite low cost performance car and it served to positively associate the Wankel engine with the Mazda name. All that was needed as the follow-up strategy was for Mazda to create an affordable mainstream production sports car with speed and style, powered by that unique Wankel rotary engine. They decided to build something of about the same size and similar style to the Lotus Elan: the RX-7 was born.

The First Generation Mazda RX-7 Savannah “SA22C” and FB

(Series 1 1978-1980, Series 2 1981-1983, Series 3 1984-1985)

The Mazda RX-7 continued the name “Savannah” that had been used for the small RX-3 sports coupe but it was a completely different car, the only thing in common with the RX-3 being the fact that the RX-7 was also fitted with a Mazda Wankel engine.

Designed by a team led by Matasaburo Maeda the new RX-7 went on sale alongside a couple of other Mazda rotary engined cars; the Mazda RX-5 Cosmo CD Series, which had followed on from the original Cosmo but which was a completely new design, and the Mazda Luce luxury sedan, which was often also marketed with a piston engine as the Mazda 929. So Mazda’s rotary line-up included the Cosmo CD coupe, the Luce luxury sedan, and the RX-7 Savannah as the Lotus Elan-like sports car.

Mazda RX7 sports car cutaway diagram

Mazda used safe and predictable conventional technology as much as possible in their new sports car. The front suspension was by McPherson Strut with anti-roll bar, one of the most common types used on Japanese cars, while at the rear was a beam axle supported by a quite complex four link system combined with a Watts Linkage, coil springs all around.

Mazda RX-7 front rear suspension

In typical Japanese style of the time the front brakes were discs while at the rear were drums. This served to keep the suspension and braking system familiar to most mechanics who would service it, and to provide the best handling possible while still retaining a beam axle at the rear. In line with this the common worm and roller steering system was used despite the fact that a rack and pinion system would have appealed to sports car purists much more.

To get the most out of this complex, but pretty conventional suspension the car would need as low a center of gravity as was feasible, and as close to a 50/50 front to rear weight distribution as possible. The compact size of the Wankel rotary engine was a great asset in achieving these aims. The smallness of the Wankel enabled its being fitted behind the front axle line, giving the RX-7 a “front mounted mid-engine” and thus achieving a near perfectly even front to rear weight distribution. The engine’s small physical size also permitted its being mounted low, thus keeping the center of gravity low.

Mazda RX7 cutaway drawing

There were a few features of the Wankel rotary engine that attracted Mazda’s engineers and management to it, some of those features were technical advantages, and one was regulatory. The Wankel engine produces power out of proportion to its capacity. This means that a Wankel engine produces equivalent power to a reciprocating engine of much larger capacity. For a car this keeps weight down and allows for the use of a more compact engine space. But there is also a regulatory benefit in that the Wankel engine, having a smaller capacity, puts a car into a less expensive licensing category.

In Japan cars with an engine capacity below 1,500cc were exempt from the annual tax that applied to cars above 1,500cc. The RX-7 was fitted with a twin rotor 12A engine of 1,146 cc capacity, nicely inside of the Japanese 1,500cc limit (Note: each of the two rotors of the engine had a capacity of 573cc).

This 12A engine had technical advances that made it better than its Mazda predecessors. Earlier engines had used a sprayed metal coating in the rotor side-housing, a clever part of the solution to the edge chatter problem of early engines, and something that when combined with the use of carbon-aluminum edge seals had been the secret of making the Mazda Wankel engines viable for production.

The new 12A engine however did away with that original solution and instead used a Sheet metal Insertion Process (SIP) which involved a chrome plated sheet steel liner inserted into the rotor housing. The result of this was a rotor housing with a much harder and more durable inner surface, so hard in fact that the carbon-aluminum edge seals could be done away with and cast iron seals used in their stead.

The power output of the 12A engine was 100hp @ 6,000rpm and the early model of the RX-7 tipped the scales around 2,300lb (i.e. one metric tonne) and the aerodynamic body boasted a drag coefficient of just 0.36: so the RX-7 was all set to be a nippy little performer.

What would set it apart however would be the attribute of a Wankel engine that a piston engine does not share, a Wankel engine loves to rev at high speed, and it does it without the sort of problems that a reciprocating engine presents. The engine was given a redline of 7,000rpm and, because it would sound so happy revving its little six chambered heart out, was also given a warning buzzer to let the driver know that he or she needed to back off the throttle before the engine suffered a nasty and expensive mishap.

That first RX-7 was capable of a top speed of around 120mph (190 km/hr) and could do a standing to 60mph in 9.2 seconds. It was also capable of generating 0.779g in cornering, depending on the tires fitted, because of its low center of gravity and even weight distribution. These first generation cars can be found with either four or five speed manual transmission or a JATCO 3N71B three speed automatic.

The first generation cars were given an update in 1981 heralding in the Series 2 models. These Series 2 cars had some different styling features including plastic covered integrated bumpers and black rubber side moldings with wraparound tail-lights, styling features that would be carried on in the later Series 3.

The Series 2 models no longer had the four speed manual gearbox but were fitted with the five speed as standard. The fuel tank was increased in capacity and the interior was redesigned into a cosy yet businesslike environment. The speedometer was changed from 85mph to 130mph in 1983 with the removal of the 85mph speedometer limit that had been imposed by zealous US administrators seeming to think that “what you don’t know can’t hurt you”, i.e. “if your speedometer only goes up to 85mph then you won’t go any faster”. Americans were grateful that President Ronald Reagan saw the folly of the rule and helped remove it in 1981.

The RX-7 was offered in a number of option packages and the GSL package was offered in 1983. This provided four wheel disc brakes, and for hot and sunny Australia the front discs were ventilated: the package also included a clutch type limited slip differential. Because the US Department of Transportation mandated a 17 digit Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) system the Series 2 and Series 3 cars were given the FB designation in their VIN.

The power of the 12A engine was also increased slightly in the FB cars from 100hp to 114hp. In 1983 the Mazda RX-7 was included in Car and Driver magazine’s “Ten Best” list.

The final series for the First Generation RX-7 was the Series 3 which were introduced in 1984. The Series 3 cars would see the introduction of the GSL-SE option package for the North American market, which dropped a 1,308cc fuel injected 13B RE-EGI twin rotor engine into the engine bay. This engine was a development of the 12A and gained its additional capacity by deepening the rotors and chambers to 80mm, so each chamber was of 654cc capacity.

This engine began production life back in 1972, being installed in the RX-4 and Luce prior to appearing in the Series 3 RX-7 and it would continue in various forms through to the 2002 RX-7. Because the 13B engine has been the most common of the Mazda rotary engines it can be used in restoring First Generation RX-7 if parts for the original 12A engine are too difficult to obtain. The fitting requires some modifications, but it is reputed not to be a difficult switch to make.

With its increased performance the GSL-SE also received larger diameter disc brakes front and rear and stiffened suspension.

In Japan one of the early Series 3 models, released in September 1983, was the Savannah RX-7 Turbo which was fitted with a turbocharged 12A engine, much the same as was fitted in the Mazda Luce and Cosmo of that year. The turbocharged engine produced 163hp @ 6,500rpm and featured a specially modified “Impact Turbo” which had the rotor vanes of the turbo made smaller and the turbo designed to operate 20% faster than one for a conventional piston engine. This being necessary because of the different gas flow characteristics of the Wankel engine.

The First Generation cars ended production in 1985 to make way for the next generation RX-7, which would change the overall concept of the car in modest but important ways.

The Second Generation Mazda RX-7 FC

(Series 4 1985-1988, Series 5 1989-1992)

 

Where the First Generation Mazda RX-7 Savannah had been created as a pure sports car and used the Lotus Elan as its inspiration, the Second Generation moved away from that and shifted its inspiration to that of the Porsche 924 and 944.

The vast bulk of Mazda RX-7 sales had been to the United States market and so Mazda’s Chief Project Engineer Akio Uchiyama, took some members of his design team to the United States to study what it had been that had encouraged sales, and what was believed to be the changes that could be made that would consolidate and improve on sales.

Mazda RX-7 Second Generation sports car

It had been the observation that buyers tended to admire the Porsche 924 and 944, whereas they often would never have heard of the Lotus Elan, that leaned Uchiyama and his team to aim for some changes to the styling of the Second Generation RX-7, and to look for ways to increase the power to cope with the weight that would be added by providing more luxurious fittings.

In order to actually be competitive with the Porsches the Second Generation RX-7 was going to need some refinements of its steering and suspension. The worm and roller steering was done away with and replaced with the much preferred rack and pinion, while at the rear the multi-link and Watts Linkage beam axle was replaced with a fully independent system, something that the RX-7’s competitor, the Datsun 240Z and its siblings, had possessed from the outset.

Not only did the Second Generation RX-7 provide a fully independent suspension but it also added the sophistication of the Dynamic Tracking Suspension System (DTSS) which provided passive limited rear wheel steering to give added directional stability in a straight line and more neutral handling in corners.

The directional stability was created by giving the rear wheels a small degree of toe-out with this being maintained in gentle cornering. Under heavy cornering, with forces up around 0.5g or greater the system switched to a slight toe-in condition to balance any tendency towards oversteer, something the First Generation cars had been known for.

Mazda RX7 sports car

In addition to the sophistication of the DTSS, the FC generation RX-7 also introduced an Auto Adjusting Suspension (AAS) system. This system automatically changed the car’s damping characteristics to suit the road conditions by providing anti-dive and anti-squat as well as compensation for changing camber conditions.

The additional power to propel the additional 800lb weight of the new car was provided by a fuel injected 13B-VDEI twin rotor engine delivering 146hp in its North American

The turbocharger for these cars featured a “twin scroll” design, used to alleviate turbo-lag. In this the turbocharger was provided with two chambers, a smaller primary chamber, and a larger secondary chamber: this being done to provide a more immediate boost from the smaller chamber while the larger chamber would open up at higher revolutions. This unit was also provided with an air-to-air intercooler.

Despite being a heavier car and its providing a comfort oriented driving experience, and therefore feeling a bit more detached, these RX-7 FC generation cars were well liked both by the buying public and by the motoring press. It was only in Australia that the need to return to the lighter more Lotus like handling of the First Generation cars seems to have been felt.

To this end Australian Motors Mazda created a special limited edition 250 Sports model which was stripped of power steering, power windows, and even the rear window wiper, in an effort to lose some of that 800lb (363kg) of added weight.

Mazda RX7 Infini sports car

Just as there were option packages and limited edition cars for the First Generation so this also followed onto the Second Generation cars. The unusually named “ɛ̃fini” for the Japanese market was limited to 600 cars per year and included various upgrades of such things as the Engine Control Unit (ECU), suspension, special aluminum alloy wheels, bonnet scoop and other bodywork enhancements including the “ɛ̃fini” badgework.

Mazda RX7 convertible sports car

1988 saw the introduction of an RX-7 convertible. The soft top was a remarkable design being made as a unit and power operated. The convertible top featured a heated rear glass and a unique rigid panel that came up behind the passenger seats to prevent drafts from the rear of the car reaching passengers when the top was down, making it possible to drive the car with the top down in cool to cold weather.

Mazda RX7 convertible

Two other special editions worthy of note were the 10th Anniversary Edition of 1998 and the GTUs which were made between 1989 to 1990. The 10th Anniversary model was based on the Turbo II with a Crystal White paint scheme with white 16″ alloy seven spoke wheels, white body moldings and tail light housings. To contrast with the whiteness was a black interior and black leather wrapped Momo steering wheel and gearlever knob, with “10th Anniversary Edition” on the wheel boss as one would expect.

With the RX-7 doing so well in motor sport Mazda decided to create a lightened version of the RX-7, in some respects similar to the idea behind the Australian special version. Like the Australian lightweight model this “GTUs” model had ordinary wind-up windows, and no rear window wiper. The car was fitted with a conventionally aspirated 13B engine but was fitted with high performance options such as the ventilated front and rear discs used on the turbocharged models along with four pot front calipers and a 4.300 type viscous limited slip differential which did not appear on any other model.

The RX-7 GTUs was fitted with 16″ wheels shod with 205/55VR tires and also had speed sensing power steering so that the driver would have excellent feel for the rack and pinion steering in normal driving, but power assistance for close maneuvering. In all 1,100 of these cars were made, 1,000 in 1989 and the last 100 in 1990.

The Third Generation Mazda RX-7 “FD” (1992-2002)

(Series 6 1992-1995, Series 7 1996-1998, Series 8 1998-2002)

Mazda RX7 sports car

The Third Generation FD Mazda RX-7 marked a departure from the original concept, that of being a small enough car to remain below the size and engine capacity ceiling to avoid the need to pay Japanese taxes. The new RX-7 was below the engine capacity threshold, but not that for physical size, particularly its width. This made it a luxury sports car in Japan with the inherent additional costs that imposed.

Mazda RX-7 sports car

To fill the small sporty car gap left vacant by the RX-7’s move into the luxury class Mazda created the small MX-5 roadster and the MX-3 coupe, both only fitted with piston engines, not rotary. In a sense this marked the writing on the wall for the future of Mazda rotary power, it was phased into the most expensive models in their product line-up, and ultimately the rotary would be phased out as the RX-7 and RX-8 ended production along with the other high performance rotary engine models, such as the final model of the Mazda Cosmo.

Mazda ɛ̃fini RX-7 sports car

For the Japan domestic market the RX-7 was sold under the prestigious “ɛ̃fini” brand name to set it apart from the ordinary Mazda products. The model was made with a twin turbocharged twin rotor 13B-REW engine. This engine used a sequential twin turbocharging system which Mazda had developed in collaboration with Hitachi. The other Mazda car it was used in was the high performance Cosmo JC Series.

This sequential twin turbocharging system used a first turbocharger to deliver around 10psi boost from around 1,800rpm. The second turbocharger would not come in to play unless the engine was under high throttle and the engine speed had attained 4,000rpm and above, it would then activate to maintain 10psi boost at that much higher engine speed up to the redline, with the second turbocharger effectively taking over the delivery of engine boost from 4,500rpm on up.

The system operated almost seamlessly, with a slight drop in boost pressure to 8psi around the 4,500rpm changeover point. Thus the engine was maintained at a consistent delivery of power and torque all the way through its rev range. The engines of the Series 6 cars from 1992-1993 produced 252hp with 217lb/ft of torque, and this power output would be increased to 276hp with 231lb/ft of torque by 2002, when the Series 8 cars ended production.

ɛ̃fini Mazda RX7

In Japan the ɛ̃fini RX-7 was made as the base model Type S, the lightweight sporting model the Type R, and the Type RZ, Type RB, A-spec and the Touring X equipped with a four speed automatic transmission.

For the North American market the Mazda RX-7 was offered in base model, the R models, and the Touring with automatic transmission. The touring model was equipped for its purpose with fog lights, sunroof, Bose acoustic wave sound system, rear window wiper, and nice comfy leather seats for those long hours on the road.

The R models (R1 and R2) were performance oriented with stiffer suspension, Bilstein shock absorbers, an oil cooler, aerodynamics body package with a front air dam and rear wing type spoiler, and the seats were nice suede to allow sweaty skin to breathe while maintaining a grip to ensure the driver did not slide around under enthusiastic cornering.

From 1996-1998 a group of updated models known as the Series 7 cars were produced only in right hand drive for markets in Japan, Australia, New Zealand and Britain. These cars had a 16 bit ECU with improved intake and manifold vacuum routing giving these cars an increase in power of about 10hp for manual transmission vehicles. These cars were marketed under both Mazda and ɛ̃fini brand names depending on the market.

The final cars of the Third Generation FD Mazda RX-7 were the Series 8 cars, made between 1998-2002 and this model variant was exclusively made for the Japan Domestic Market.

The Series 8 cars were the last of the line for the Mazda RX-7. The car that had begun inspired by the Lotus Elan of the 1960’s and 1970’s had gone on to become a world class sports car with an impressive array of motorsport accomplishments to its credit. It retained the front mid-engine layout throughout its life and its intelligent Japanese engineering kept it at the head of the pack, a technology leader, and a superb car to drive.

The sophisticated technology of the FD Third Generation of cars means that they need sophisticated maintenance in order to keep them operating flawlessly and there are owners who have discovered that information the hard way, oftentimes from purchasing one of these cars second hand and subsequently finding that the maintenance that was needed had been lacking.

These sorts of dynamics have led to the later RX-7’s gaining an reputation for unreliability, a reputation that is arguably not deserved: if you want to own a sophisticated high technology car then you need to invest in high level maintenance to keep it working perfectly. If you want a car that needs little maintenance then you should of course buy something conventional and non-demanding. The RX-7 is a racehorse of a car, so expect that the “Vet” bills are going to be a significant outlay. There’s an old saying that claims “The best things in life are free”, its not true. Typically the best things in life are going to cost you.

The RX-7 in Motorsport

Mazda were determined to prove the rotary engine in motorsport, realizing that this was key to having it gain widespread acceptance. Their great success was with their four rotor 787B sports racing car that won the prestigious 24 Hours Le Mans in 1991, and becoming the first Japanese car to achieve this.

Mazda RX7 Alan Moffat Bathurst Mount Panorama Australian Touring Car Championships

The RX-7 was entered in the IMSA GTU class in the 24 Hours Daytona and managed a first and second, going on to obtain the championship in this series for seven consecutive years. In 1981 the little RX-7 went to the Spa 24 Hours race and won.

The RX-7 also made its way “down under” to Australia where Canadian born driver Alan Moffat began campaigning the car in the Australian Touring Car Championships gaining victory in 1983, along with three podium places in the  Bathurst 1000 race which was held on the demanding Mount Panorama circuit. Mazda would later name two of its Series 8 RX-7 models after the Bathurst circuit, the Type R Bathurst, and the Type R Bathurst R.

Conclusion

The Mazda RX-7 stands out as one of very few successful cars powered by a Wankel rotary engine. Mazda committed to a “make or break” effort to create a name for their company based on rotary engine technology, and where German company NSU and French company Citroën did not succeed Mazda did: and that was a feat of epic proportions. The RX-7 was the sports car created out of that technological effort and it turned out to be one of the greatest sports cars ever created because of the unique characteristics of the rotary engine that especially suit a sports car or a touring car.

Will we see a return to rotary engine technology by Mazda or is that season now at an end? No-one really knows the answer to that question at this stage. It may be that Mazda has established its name and credentials such that it does not need to take another gamble on rotary engine technology, at least not yet at this time in history. As it now is Mazda’s RX-7 stands out as a legendary sports cars that has earned its place in automotive history, it is an icon of the 1980’s and 1990’s.

Photo Credits: Mazda.

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A Motorized 1983 Mongoose Californian BMX Bike by Sub Kulture Cycles https://silodrome.com/motorized-mongoose-bmx-bike/ Fri, 24 Jan 2020 07:30:53 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102551 Before you get out the pitchforks and flaming torches let me put your minds at ease – no vintage Mongoose Californian BMX bikes were harmed in the production of the motorized bike you see before you. The frame isn’t an original Mongoose unit, it was made by Adam Ryan at Kepspeed in the UK as...

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Before you get out the pitchforks and flaming torches let me put your minds at ease – no vintage Mongoose Californian BMX bikes were harmed in the production of the motorized bike you see before you.

The frame isn’t an original Mongoose unit, it was made by Adam Ryan at Kepspeed in the UK as a semi-replica of the famous BMX frame with the addition of mounts for an engine, and a top tube that doubles as a fuel tank.

The bike is the work of Tony at Sub Kulture Cycles, a disarmingly friendly guy who is currently working on an ambitious plan to build motorized versions of 12 famous BMX bikes, and he’s doing it all in his home garage.

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 20

In BMX circles Mongoose is one of the true icons, if you’re anything like me and you spent time in the ’70s and ’80s riding BMX bikes around your neighbourhood you’ll know that anyone lucky enough to be riding a Mongoose likely also had a Nintendo and a backyard swimming pool.

The company was founded by Skip Hess in 1974, the first product wasn’t a bike but a wheel – the MotoMag One, a high-strength magnesium alloy wheel that would far outlast its spoked counterparts.

Over the following decades Mongoose turned out a series of revolutionary BMX bikes as well as new versions of the MotoMag, and one of the first production mountain bikes with front and rear suspension.

In recent years there’s been increased interest in some of the more unusual motorized bicycles both for the fun factor and as part of the ongoing revolution in urban and suburban transportation. Companies have popped up around the world offering engines and mounting kits specifically for bicycles, and companies like Kepspeed offer custom frames and other parts.

When Tony was outlining his plans for this build he started with the frame choice, once that was settled he sourced all of the correct stickers and decals for the frame to complete the illusion. He did such a good job that he’s had to calm down strangers on the street who saw the bike and thought he’d chopped up an original Mongoose to make it.

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 13

Mark Nadin from Black Crow Engineering took care of the bespoke billet parts required by the build, Vernon Moss took care of the nickel and gold plating, and a pair of 72 spoke rims were sourced from Kepspeed – using a Honda drum brake up front for additional stopping ability.

The engine is a Lifan 4-speed 125cc semi-automatic engine fitted with a Molkt VM 26 carburettor and a custom exhaust fabricated by Nath at NAW Automotive, the tail pipe features a striking viper that’s proven hugely popular with kids and adults alike.

The bike is also fitted with original CW BMX handlebars, a Kashimax BMX seat, an original Mongoose pad set, and a Renthal 420 chain and sprocket.

With the bike’s low weight and punchy 125cc engine it’s capable of considerably more speed than we’re used to seeing from a BMX bike, and no one had yet had the guts to take it onto a half pipe. If you’d like to see more of Tony’s work or get in touch with him you can click here to follow him on Instagram.

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 12

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 17

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 19

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 16

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 15

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 14

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 10

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 9

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 8

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 7

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 4

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 2

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 1

Motorized Mongoose BMX Bike 5

Tony SubCultureCycles

Images courtesy of David Garrison

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There’s a Rare 702 Cubic Inch (11.5 Litre) GMC V12 For Sale On eBay https://silodrome.com/702-cubic-inch-11-5-litre-gmc-v12/ Fri, 24 Jan 2020 04:03:55 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102632 The 702 cubic inch (11.5 litre) GMC V12 was only ever built between 1960 and 1965, it’s estimated that approximately 5,000 were made, and that only 1,500 or so remain in usable condition today. The 702 Cubic Inch – 11.5 Litre GMC V12 Engineers at GMC developed this V12 using the 351 cu. in. V6...

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The 702 cubic inch (11.5 litre) GMC V12 was only ever built between 1960 and 1965, it’s estimated that approximately 5,000 were made, and that only 1,500 or so remain in usable condition today.

The 702 Cubic Inch – 11.5 Litre GMC V12

Engineers at GMC developed this V12 using the 351 cu. in. V6 as a starting point, though it should be noted that they developed an entirely unique casting for the block as well as a unique crankshaft and camshaft. Impressively, the crankshaft tipped the scales at 180 lbs, the engine measured in at 4.2 feet long, and it weighed 1,500 lbs fully assembled including intake and exhaust systems.

As you may have guessed from the above specifications this was not a car engine, it was designed for semis, missile transporters, and other large trucks, it also found use in fire trucks, airport tow vehicles, and as stationary power units. Unusually for a truck engine, it’s powered by gasoline rather than diesel. This is because gasoline was so cheap in the early 1960s that it was a viable choice for truck use, and many truckers preferred gas-powered engines.

702 Cubic Inch 11.5 Litre GMC V12 Engine

Despite the prodigious capacity of this V12, it produced relatively low power figures with 275 hp at 2,400 rpm – but this is to be expected with truck engines as they’re typically biased towards torque. The GMC V12 turns out a mighty 625 ft lbs of torque at only 2,100 rpm. That said, aftermarket tuning companies like Thunder V12 have made a name for themselves rebuilding these engines into performance powerhouses capable of considerably more horsepower and torque.

In recent years the GMC V12 has become a popular choice for those wanting to build highly unusual hot rods and other custom cars, it’s also been used in tractor pullers – frequently with engines rebuilt by Thunder V12.

The GMC V12 Shown Here

The engine you see here was used as a stationary power unit on an oil rig, there are actually two engines for sale as well as a large pile of spare parts. Somewhat comically the seller mentions that although the engine did turn over in the past, it doesn’t currently. It’s a new take on the old “ran when parked” line so common to Craigslist car ads.

The engine does come with free access to the spare parts pile on a first come first served basis, and they do mention that the engine has its distributor and water pump. The engine is listed with a Buy It Now price of $7,500 USD which works out to just $10.6 per cubic inch of engine capacity.

Visit The Listing Here

702 Cubic Inch 11.5 Litre GMC V12 2

702 Cubic Inch 11.5 Litre GMC V12 1

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Steve McQueen’s Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker https://silodrome.com/steve-mcqueens-excelsior-super-x-factory-built-flat-tracker/ Thu, 23 Jan 2020 08:00:28 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102526 This 1926 Excelsior Super X factory-built flat tracker would be a special bike even if it wasn’t for its A-list former owner, in fact if you know your motorcycle racers this bike has two A-list former owners – Bud Ekins and Steve McQueen. Steve McQueen, Bud Ekins, and the Excelsior Super X Ekins bought this bike...

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This 1926 Excelsior Super X factory-built flat tracker would be a special bike even if it wasn’t for its A-list former owner, in fact if you know your motorcycle racers this bike has two A-list former owners – Bud Ekins and Steve McQueen.

Steve McQueen, Bud Ekins, and the Excelsior Super X

Ekins bought this bike for his close friend and frequent work buddy Steve McQueen at some point in the 1970s. The name Bud Ekins may not be familiar to you, but it’s very likely you’ve seen him before. He was the professional off-road motorcycle racer who was McQueen’s stunt double for the famous border fence jump scene in The Great Escape, he also took on some stunt driving during the filming of the famous chase scene through the streets of San Francisco in the movie Bullitt.

Ekins is one of very few people to have been inducted into Not only the Stuntmen’s Hall of Fame, but also the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, and the Off-Road Motorsports Hall of Fame. He also won a slew of races including the Catalina Grand Prix, the Big Bear Hare & Hound desert race (three wins), he also received a gold medal at the 1962 International Six Days Trials in East Germany, and he was part of the 1964 U.S. ISDT team with his brother Dave Ekins, John Steen, Cliff Coleman, and Steve McQueen.

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Side

Steve McQueen needs no introduction, he was an accomplished motorcycle racer before he became a Hollywood celebrity, once he became famous he continued racing and often used the pseudonym “Harvey Mushman” so as not to attract media attention. McQueen’s collection of cars, motorcycles, and planes is the stuff of legend. He was a purebred petrolhead and vehicles from his collection now fetch a signifiant premium at auction, the primary stunt car from the movie Bullitt sold at auction recently for an eye watering $3.74 million USD.

The Excelsior Super X is one of the most important pre-WW2 American motorcycles in history, it was the first mass-produced American 45 cu. in. (740cc) V-twin and it triggered a fast response from both Indian and Harley-Davidson, who both introduced their own 45 cu. in. models as quickly as possible.

Today the 750cc class still forms the backbone of the American flat track racing world.

Funnily enough, the Super X was almost a Harley-Davidson, it was actually developed by Arthur “Connie” Constantine who was the Assistant Chief Engineer at Harley. When he showed the designs to company co-founder Walter Davidson he was reprimanded for wasting company time. Constantine left Harley and went to Excelsior who hired him and put his remarkable 45 cu. in. motorcycle into production in 1925.

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Front

Steve McQueen’s Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker

The motorcycle you see here belonged to Steve McQueen for a number of years, as mentioned above it was given to him by his close friend Bud Ekins and McQueen kept it for the rest of his life. It was sold in 1984 after his untimely passing, and it’s still accompanied by all of its supporting documentation.

As a factory-built flat track racer this bike has no front brake, there’s just a single drum on the rear. It also has a racing frame, no front fender, no provision for any lighting, an oversized rear fender, short headers, and a race tuned engine that runs on alcohol.

McQueen liked to ride this Excelsior around his Santa Paula ranch and the local road and laneways. It remains unrestored since its time in his ownership, and it still runs. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing on Mecum.

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Side 2

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Seat

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Logo

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Logo 2

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Front 2

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Front 4

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Front 3

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Exhaust

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Engine

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Engine 3

Steve McQueen Excelsior Super X Factory-Built Flat Tracker Tank

Images courtesy of Mecum

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Project Car: A Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car https://silodrome.com/harley-davidson-midget-race-car/ Wed, 22 Jan 2020 10:01:02 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102363 This is an original 1949 TQ midget race car that’s powered by a 45 cu. in. Harley-Davidson Flathead engine, it’s never been restored and so it’s kept all of its hard-earned battle scars from years competing on American oval tracks. Midget Car Racing + TQ Midget Car Racing Midget car racing was started to give...

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This is an original 1949 TQ midget race car that’s powered by a 45 cu. in. Harley-Davidson Flathead engine, it’s never been restored and so it’s kept all of its hard-earned battle scars from years competing on American oval tracks.

Midget Car Racing + TQ Midget Car Racing

Midget car racing was started to give an affordable entry point into motorsport for people with limited budgets, the first midget car race was held on the 10th of August, 1933 at the Loyola High School Stadium in Los Angeles. The popularity of the new racing series skyrocketed, fans loved the fast cars and the underdog status of the drivers, many of whom built their own cars.

Australia and New Zealand began hold their own midget car races by the end of the 1930s, and the sport remains hugely popular in all three countries. Midget cars are typically powered by highly tuned inline-4 cylinder engines producing between 300 and 400+ bhp, the cars only weigh ~900 pounds (410 kilograms), so their power-to-weight ratio is excellent.

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car 2

Although they’re built for circle track racing midget cars have had some successes in other racing disciplines, Rodger Ward once famously beat an entire field of Formula Libre cars to win a race in 1959 at Lime Rock Park. He also competed in the 1959 United States Grand Prix for Formula 1 cars driving his midget car, however this endeavour proved far less successful and he retired with a mechanical failure after 20 laps.

Many drivers who started out in midget car racing went on to compete in higher echelons of motorsport including Formula 1 World Champion Mario Andretti, A. J. Foyt, Tony Stewart, Sarah Fisher, Jeff Gordon, Ryan Newman, Kyle Larson, and 1959 Indianapolis 500 winner Rodger Ward.

For this who wanted to compete a new slightly smaller class was created called Three Quarter Midget Racing, or TQ Midget Racing. As the name suggests, these cars are 3/4 the size of a full-sized midget race car. This means they can run smaller, cheaper engines, and they’re cheaper to build. TQ midgets often run in support races for regular midget car racing series, and it’s the TQ cars who probably most closely resemble the original intentions of midget car racing from 1933.

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Engine

The Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Shown Here

The Harley-Davidson powered TQ midget race car you see here was built in either the late 1940s or early 1950s by a home builder, it’s powered by a 45 cu. in. (750cc) Harley-Davidson flathead engine that was possibly sourced from a WWII-era Harley-Davidson WLA – the military bike built by the manufacturer for the American forces during the war.

WLAs were plentiful in the post-war years and very cheap to buy, so they were used for all manner of purposes, from commuting to flat track racing and everything in between. In stock trim the 45 cu. in. engine produces 25 hp at 4,500 rpm and was capable of 65 mph (105 km/h), however these engines were often heavily tuned for racing and would produce considerably more power.

This TQ midget car is in complete condition but it clearly needs a thorough restoration, once complete it’ll make an excellent, affordable little vintage circle track racer. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing on Mecum.

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Side 2

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Side

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Steering Wheel

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Wheels

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Seat

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Front

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Front 2

Harley-Davidson Powered TQ Midget Race Car Back

Images courtesy of Mecum

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Dainese Smart Jacket – MotoGP Airbag Protection – 300% to 400% More Effective Than Hard Armor https://silodrome.com/dainese-smart-jacket-airbag/ Wed, 22 Jan 2020 10:00:23 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102581 The Dainese Smart Jacket was designed to bring MotoGP-grade airbag protection to street riders, it can be worn over or under any jacket, hoodie, or outfit to provide a significant added level of impact protection. There can be little doubt that personal airbags are the future of motorcycle safety gear, particularly when combined with a...

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The Dainese Smart Jacket was designed to bring MotoGP-grade airbag protection to street riders, it can be worn over or under any jacket, hoodie, or outfit to provide a significant added level of impact protection.

There can be little doubt that personal airbags are the future of motorcycle safety gear, particularly when combined with a more traditional motorcycle jacket or racing suit providing abrasion resistance.

The Dainese Smart Jacket uses D-Air, MotoGP airbag technology, and it has seven onboard sensors monitoring data 1,000 times per second with the algorithm able to detect low-sides, high-sides, and object/vehicle/rear-end collisions.

Dainese Smart Jacket Model 1

The chest protection provided by the airbag meets or exceeds CE Level 2 for airbags, transmitted force is <2.5kN. Compared with standard CE level 2 hard armor which transmits <9kN – so the airbag disperses over 300% more energy than its rigid counterpart.

The back protection meets or exceeds CE Level 1 for airbags, transmitted force is <4.5kN. Standard level 1 hard armor CE transmits <18kN so the airbag disperses over 400% more energy.

It’s almost certain that we’ll continue to see an increasing number of airbag equipped vests, jackets, pants, and race suits as the technology becomes cheaper and more affordable to regular riders. The Dainese Smart Jacket is a great step in this direction, it costs the same as a comparable quality motorcycle jacket and it has the ability to be worn with all of your regular gear.

Visit The Store

 

Dainese Smart Jacket Collage

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The Only One Ever Made: The 1967 BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback Prototype https://silodrome.com/bmw-glas-3000-v8-fastback-prototype/ Tue, 21 Jan 2020 08:45:21 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102404 This is the 1967 BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback prototype, it’s the only one that was ever made. There was hope that BMW would embrace the car as its own luxury coupe however it was sadly to remain a single prototype, with BMW instead developing their own car – the 3.0 CS. Glas, BMW-Glas, and the...

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This is the 1967 BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback prototype, it’s the only one that was ever made. There was hope that BMW would embrace the car as its own luxury coupe however it was sadly to remain a single prototype, with BMW instead developing their own car – the 3.0 CS.

Glas, BMW-Glas, and the Goggomobil

The short-lived series of vehicles from BMW-Glas are now highly sought after, they were only produced in limited numbers from 1966, when Glas was acquired by BMW, until 1968.

Glas was one of the smallest automakers in Germany before it was acquired, it started out in 1883 building agricultural machinery before shifting into car manufacturing and scooter production. Most Glas cars were quite small and economical, the most famous was the Goggomobil but the company also produced the Glas Isar T600/T700 , the Glas 1004/1204/1304 , the Glas 1300 GT/1700 GT, the Glas 1700, and finally, the Glas 2600 V8/3000 V8.

Interestingly, Glas was the first automaker to mass-produce a car with an overhead cam spun by a timing belt and it was rumoured that this was the primary reason that BMW acquired the company – to also acquire the patents. The truth is that BMW also needed more production facilities, more workers and more engineers, so the acquisition of Glas offered BMW a number of benefits. Glas had a production facility in Dingolfing, Germany, and today this same site contains BMW’s largest factory, with 22,000 workers.

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 3

After taking over Glas in 1966 BMW began immediately winding up the production of most Glas models, some were killed off immediately and some were rebranded as BMW-Glas for a year or two before being retired. A V8 had been underdevelopment by the engineers at Glas, initially with a 2.6 litre capacity (2580cc) which was later upgraded to a 3.0 litre capacity (2982cc) producing 160 bhp. The V8 was closely based on the earlier 4-cylinder engine, and it shared the belt driven overhead cam of the 4-cylinder. The Glas V8 featured two overhead cams (one per bank), each driven by a belt and operating two valves per cylinder.

The Glas V8 was used in the Glas 2600 V8 and the BMW-Glas 3000 V8, there were also plans for a 3.2 litre version and a prototype engine was built, however the car never materialised. This is a pity, as the engine was an advanced design for the time, but it would live on after the company was absorbed by BMW in one additional new model – the BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback prototype.

The BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback Prototype

The BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback prototype was designed by the team at Carrozzeria Frua and built in 1967 on the platform of the BMW-Glas 3000 V8. Whereas the BMW-Glas 3000 V8 had dating that was a little dated, the Fastback was cutting edge. It featured sleek, angular, and low slung bodywork with a long fastback roofline made popular by countless European and American GT cars of the era.

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Engine 2

The Frua styling of the fastback was ahead of its time, considering it was penned in 1967 it has more in common with vehicles of the 1970s than the 1960s. The car was displayed by Carrozzeria Frua at the Frankfurt and Paris Motor Shows in 1967, the Geneva Salon in 1968, and the Barcelona Motor Show in 1969.

With its unmistakably Italian styling combined with its BMW badges and its overhead cam V8 the Fastback must have drawn a lot of attention at the shows, sadly this wasn’t enough to encourage BMW to put it into production.

After it was displayed at some of the major motor shows on the European continent the BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback prototype was sold into private hands in Spain after the Barcelona show, possibly by someone who saw it on display. This first owner kept the car for 20 years until their death, when it was purchased from his estate by one of his employees.

The car underwent a restoration approximately five years ago and it’s now due to sell with Bonhams at the Les Grandes Marques du Monde au Grand Palais auction on the 6th of February in Paris with an estimated value of between €250,000 to €350,000. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 2

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 1

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Tail Lights

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Side

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Side 2

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Seats

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Rear

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Rear Side

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Rear Window

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Interior

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Interior 3

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Interior 2

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Grille

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Front

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Engine

BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Badge

Images courtesy of Bonhams

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The 911 Turbo T-Shirt by Petro Camp https://silodrome.com/911-turbo-t-shirt-petro-camp/ Tue, 21 Jan 2020 08:30:15 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=102349 This is the 911 Turbo T-Shirt by the team at Petro Camp, it’s one of their newer designs and it features blueprints of what is almost certainly the most famous turbocharged sports car in history. Porsche originally developed the Turbo 911 in the early 1970s as a homologation special, they gave it the model number...

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This is the 911 Turbo T-Shirt by the team at Petro Camp, it’s one of their newer designs and it features blueprints of what is almost certainly the most famous turbocharged sports car in history.

Porsche originally developed the Turbo 911 in the early 1970s as a homologation special, they gave it the model number “930” and this is the name typically used by enthusiasts when referring to the car.

911 Turbo T-Shirt Front And Back

The early 911 Turbo has legendary turbo lag and due to the rear mounted engine it’s prone to snap oversteer – a handling trait that caught many drivers out, and resulted in more than a few 930s ending up on the scrapheap. That said, experienced drivers could get astonishing performance out of the 930, and today they’re highly sought after by collectors and enthusiasts alike.

This t-shirt by Petro Camp features the blueprints for the 930 on the back, with a simple “911 Turbo” graphic on the front chest. It’s made from 100% certified organic cotton, and each one is designed and produced with local suppliers in Barcelona, Spain.

Petro Camp offer the t-shirt in sizing from M to XXL, the last batch of these sold out very quickly and we expect this batch to do the same.

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911 Turbo T-Shirt Front

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