Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Sat, 20 Oct 2018 08:01:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 Vuarnet Glacier XL Sunglasses – Worn By James Bond In Spectre https://silodrome.com/vuarnet-glacier-xl-sunglasses/ Sat, 20 Oct 2018 07:01:11 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=85121 Vuarnet Glacier XL Sunglasses – Worn By James Bond In Spectre

Daniel Craig forever made the Vuarnet Glacier sunglasses legendary when he wore them in the snow scenes of the blockbuster 2015 James Bond film Spectre. This was when French optics company Vuarnet first appeared on the radar for many, but even if you’ve never heard of the company before you’ve almost certainly seen their sunglasses – The...

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Vuarnet Glacier XL Sunglasses – Worn By James Bond In Spectre

Daniel Craig forever made the Vuarnet Glacier sunglasses legendary when he wore them in the snow scenes of the blockbuster 2015 James Bond film Spectre.

This was when French optics company Vuarnet first appeared on the radar for many, but even if you’ve never heard of the company before you’ve almost certainly seen their sunglasses – The Dude wore a pair in The Big Lebowski, and they were favored by Miles Davis, Alain Delon, and countless other cultural icons.

Vuarnet

The company started out in 1957 when Roger Pouilloux, an optician and keen ski enthusiast, invented the revolutionary polarized Skilynx lens.

Olympic skier Jean Vuarnet was the first to wear them in competition, and the lenses ability to cut glare, highlight contrasts, and enhance depth perception gave him an immediate advantage.

The two men founded the company Vuarnet as a joint enterprise to develop and sell the advanced new eyewear to skiers, before branching out into street eyewear.

Vuarnet Glacier XL Sunglasses

The Vuarnet Glacier XL Sunglasses

The Vuarnet Glacier XL sunglasses have mineral glass lenses made in-house by Vuarnet specifically for their own use. This is the same type of glass used in microscopes, camera lenses, and telescopes, and it’s far more durable than commonly-used polycarbonate lenses.

The lenses are both scratch and shock-resistant, and they provide superior protection from eye-damaging light sources – including 100% of UV light, 94% of blue light, and 91% of infrared light. The Glacier XL sunglasses offer zero chromatic distortion, exceptional clarity, and polarized optics (with an anti-reflective coating) and removable glacier shields to protect against glare.

Huckberry are offering the Glacier XL in three colorways including blue tint, regular tint, and a medium tint with a tortoise shell frame. Each pair comes with a removable leather bridge guard, and removable leather side shields for use when skiing.

All Vuarnet glasses come with an industry-leading lifetime warranty, and of course they can be worn both on the ski slopes, off piste, around town, and while escaping from Bond villains across the mountains of Austria.

Buy Here

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Tripla 0.0 675 – A Triumph Street Triple by Italian Dream Motorcycle https://silodrome.com/tripla-competizione-triumph-street-triple-italian-dream-motorcycle/ Fri, 19 Oct 2018 11:01:16 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=85113 Tripla 0.0 675 – A Triumph Street Triple by Italian Dream Motorcycle

Tripla 0.0 675 is a series of 5 bespoke Triumph Street Triples from Italian Dream Motorcycle, a company that describes itself as a microscopic motorcycle manufacturer due to the fact that they produce a limited series of motorcycles each year, with a maximum of 5 per series. Sergio Giordano and Italian Dream Motorcycle Italian Dream is an unusual...

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Tripla 0.0 675 – A Triumph Street Triple by Italian Dream Motorcycle

Tripla 0.0 675 is a series of 5 bespoke Triumph Street Triples from Italian Dream Motorcycle, a company that describes itself as a microscopic motorcycle manufacturer due to the fact that they produce a limited series of motorcycles each year, with a maximum of 5 per series.

Sergio Giordano and Italian Dream Motorcycle

Italian Dream is an unusual company run by a remarkable man, at the age of 30 Sergio Giordano was diagnosed with cancer, while fighting the disease he joined a gym and threw himself headlong into training.

With the help of modern medicine and a brutal gym routine he was both cancer free and fighting fit within two years – he was so fit he won his weight division in a national Italian body building championship, two years after that he won his division in the European championship.

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Earlier in his life Sergio travelled through Indonesia, Spain, South America, and North Africa, spending 15 years living abroad. During his life he has worked as everything from an SSI scuba instructor to the founder of Italy’s most successful chain of sushi restaurants, before pursuing his lifelong passion – motorcycles and motorcycle racing.

Today Sergio runs both Italian Dream Motorcycle to build motorcycles and Italian Dream Motorcycle Media which manages the Pedercini Racing Team, and acts as the agent for a number of riders including world champion Raffael De Rosa.

Each year Italian Dream Motorcycle builds a bike inspired by one of the great Italian world championship motorcycle racers, this series was dedicated to Marco Lucchinelli – a racer who was nicknamed Crazy Horse for his wild and unpredictable riding style.

Sergio exclusively uses engineers and mechanics from the MotoGP or WSBK circuit for his builds to ensure unparalleled quality. Each build is designed with a strict function-over-form philosophy, ensuring the completed motorcycle is invariably significantly quicker around the track than the bike it started out as.

Tripla 0.0 675 – A Triumph Street Triple by Italian Dream Motorcycle

The Triumph Street Triple is based on the Speed Triple, introduced in 1994 as the British answer to the hugely popular Ducati Monster. The Speed Triple was named after the iconic Triumph Speed Twin released in 1938, and as the names imply the Twin had a two cylinder engine and the Triple was fitted with the three cylinder.

Once a suitable donor bike was found it was stripped down to the essentials so work could begin. It was decided to add a new side fairings made from hand-shaped aluminum to make the bike more aerodynamic at speed, and a new rear subframe was designed.

The original swing arm was inspected closely and a decision was made to remove it entirely and replace it with the more advanced single-sided swing arm, a WSBK engineer studied how to reposition it for best possible handling, and the monoshock was moved to a more advantageous position.

Unusually the team decided to remove the chain drive and replace it with a belt drive, using parts designed and created via CNC. A new floating rear license plate holder with integrated turn signals was developed, with new rear sets and ankle guards.

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A new seat was fashioned and upholstered by Emilian artisans who also do work for Ferrari and Maserati, and underneath there’s a new lightweight lithium-ion battery. Accossato Racing worked with Sergio to provide new handlebars, levers, and push buttons for the build, and an aero-shield was made for the characteristic twin headlights up front.

Perhaps most importantly the engine was reworked to produce 10hp thanks to a custom map and a bespoke exhaust with a triple exit on the lower righthand side. Both the front and rear suspension was replaced with Öhlins units, with Brembo gold series 4 piston brake calipers up front.

The completed bike is one of those motorcycles that looks like it’s going 100 mph while standing still, largely thanks to its svelte fairings, headlight cowl, and raised subframe. In Italy it’s already been featured in Rolling Stone Magazine and at EICMA, and Sergio is taking orders now for the other bikes in this production run.

If you’d like to read more or enquire you can click here to visit the official website.

Follow Italian Dream Motorcycle on FacebookInstagramYouTube

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Tornado Fighter-Bomber Jet Engine Table by Custom Workshop https://silodrome.com/jet-engine-table/ Fri, 19 Oct 2018 05:00:58 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84809 Tornado Fighter-Bomber Jet Engine Table by Custom Workshop

This jet engine table was built from a decommissioned Tornado Fighter-Bomber RB199 power unit by the talented team at Custom Workshop – Marek and Grzegorz. The Turbo-Union RB199 Jet Engine The Turbo-Union RB199 engine is a three-shaft turbofan engine (with afterburner) capable of 16,186 ft lbs of thrust. It has a thrust reverser, single-crystal turbine...

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Tornado Fighter-Bomber Jet Engine Table by Custom Workshop

This jet engine table was built from a decommissioned Tornado Fighter-Bomber RB199 power unit by the talented team at Custom Workshop – Marek and Grzegorz.

The Turbo-Union RB199 Jet Engine

The Turbo-Union RB199 engine is a three-shaft turbofan engine (with afterburner) capable of 16,186 ft lbs of thrust. It has a thrust reverser, single-crystal turbine blades, and a total weight of 2,390 lbs. The engine was developed jointly by MTU, Rolls-Royce, and Avio Aero, and it was first test-flown in 1972 attached to a modified Avro Vulcan.

Most commonly used on the Panavia Tornado multi-role combat aircraft, the Turbo-Union RB199 has amassed over 5 million hours of flight time, mostly with the Royal Air Force, Luftwaffe, German Navy, and the Italian Air Force.

Tornado Jet

The Custom Workshop Tornado Fighter-Bomber Jet Engine Table

The table you see here was built by hand by Marek and Grzegorz of Custom Workshop, a Polish company that specializes in the creation of some genuinely remarkable pieces of industrial design.

The table is made using multiple sections from a decommissioned Tornado engine, assembled together carefully at a height of 53 cm and a width of 100 cm, with a total weight of 75 kilograms. A tempered glass top is fitted, though you’d be reticent to put anything on it as it would block the view of the engineering within.

The price is €2,500 which actually seems pretty reasonable for a coffee table that would have been capable of Mach 2.2 in its previous life.

Buy Here

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Jet Engine Table

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Japanese Icons: The Incredible Art of Kenji Shibata aka Seevert Works https://silodrome.com/art-kenji-shibata-seevert-works/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 10:01:11 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84695 Japanese Icons: The Incredible Art of Kenji Shibata aka Seevert Works

This article was written by Jenna V. Genio AKA “Dæmon Ex Machina”, a freelance writer and photographer with a love for motoring, aviation, and adventure. You can follow her on Instagram here. Meet Kenji Shibata Kenji Shibata, also known as “Kengde Seevert” of Seevert Works, is one of the world’s premier motoring artists. He was born...

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Japanese Icons: The Incredible Art of Kenji Shibata aka Seevert Works

This article was written by Jenna V. Genio AKA “Dæmon Ex Machina”, a freelance writer and photographer with a love for motoring, aviation, and adventure. You can follow her on Instagram here.

Meet Kenji Shibata

Kenji Shibata, also known as “Kengde Seevert” of Seevert Works, is one of the world’s premier motoring artists. He was born in the city of Nobeoka in Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan and graduated from the Tama Art University in 1985. In 2008, Kenji went on to settle down in Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture where he works full-time out of his studio creating ultra-realistic paintings of iconic motorcycles and automobiles for some of Japan’s leading brands.

Kenji Shibata aka Seevert Works

While enthusiasts explore their love and passion for motorcycles in many different ways, the Japanese painter Kenji Shibata chose to channel his appreciation for motoring into astounding artworks of historic bikes. He lays his eyes on all the actual machines he depicts, working off high-resolution images that he photographs himself. The Seevert process begins with Kenji taking a 4”x5” large format photo of a motorcycle on positive film. He scans the image, enlarges it, and then transfers it onto the canvas using expert brushwork, mostly acrylic paint, sometimes oil, and hours upon hours of effort indicative of the dedication to one’s craft which the Japanese are famous for.

Kenji Shibata captures iconic vehicles in breathtaking technical detail, painstakingly rendering every mechanical component, light and shadow caressing metal, decal, design feature, perceived transparency, and composite material with obsessive care.

Now 57 years old, he spends up to 6 hours everyday hunkered down in his studio which he describes as “the second floor of a fibre cement shack built around 50 years ago in Nagoya. No insulation on the exterior walls makes it super-hot in summer and super-cold in winter.”

Buy Kenji’s Art Here

1967 Honda RA273 Formula 1 Car Rear

The Beginning of Seevert Works

“My first work in the motorcycle motif was my graduation project. I wasn’t enthusiastic about motorcycles that much back then. When I was working in the advertising department of Ajinomoto Co. after graduating from university, the company became a major sponsor of the HRC national championship team. As part of the project drafting motorcycle graphics with the marketing head, I frequently visited circuits and became interested in motorcycle racing. Since I became a freelancer, I’ve been illustrating vehicles for advertisements, magazines, and scale model packaging—all for separate contracts,” said Kenji.

In 1994, his friend introduced him to the legendary Michikiho Aika—the late pioneer, founding force, and former head of Honda’s motorcycle racing department. By then, he was the director of the Honda Collection Hall and showed an interest in Kenji’s work, asking him to start exhibiting his pieces and selling souvenir postcards at the museum.

1981 Honda RS1000

When the Honda Collection Hall moved to Twin Ring Motegi in 1998, his illustrations were used for the grand opening as well as other museum materials. This solidified Kenji Shibata’s relationship with the Japanese brand which regularly commissioned more of his work. He was even tasked with painting a portrait of Soichiro Honda.

Yamaha Motor Co. took notice and started hiring Kenji as well. He has contributed artwork to numerous official calendars and special commemorative gifts for employees and distinguished guests throughout the years, for both Honda and Yamaha. Kenji’s paintings under the name “Seevert Works” have since achieved global reach, and his prints are frequently purchased and swooned over by motoring fans from all over the world.

Kenji’s Favourite Commission

While Kenji doesn’t have a favorite motorcycle or era, he has a special penchant for road racers. Kenji says he’s willing to paint any vehicle for clients, granted that he’s able to photograph it himself for reference. “Currently, I’m mainly producing illustrations of endurance race vehicles,” said Kenji. When asked about his favorite commission so far, he cited Fiat Yamaha Team’s 2010 YZR-M1 Moto GP racer piloted by Jorge Lorenzo and Valentino Rossi. “I had spent the longest time making this.”

1974 Yamaha YZR750

“I have no favorite part of a motorcycle that I like to paint, but I don’t like to draw regularly repeated patterns like carbon fiber materials (CFRP). The CG copy-and-paste tool isn’t an option when hand drawing, and it is extremely difficult to keep doing that vegetative work.”

“As I became far-sighted, the details I could see before now become bleary, and this is why the sizes of my original drawings are enlarged. However, they take more time to complete as they get bigger. From an economic aspect, it is a negative spiral because work efficiency has gotten worse… The fun part is the process of the art gradually reaching completion over time. The hard part is the proportion to the profit. How to make more profit is a challenge.”

A Look At The Current State Of The Japanese Motorcycle Industry

During the course of our interview, Kenji had some personal insight about the state of Japanese motorcycle enthusiasm in today’s globalized context: “Lately, motorcycle makers from India and China have been notably rising and taking over higher rankings of gross annual production, while the top four makers had always been filled by Japanese manufacturers before.”

1961 Honda RC162

“Although it is a fact that these big four Japanese motorcycle makers have led the industry for a long time in both technology development, production, and sales since 1970, it seems to me that many Japanese motorcycle enthusiasts are not aware of the top quality and superior performance of the motorcycles that Japanese companies make, maybe because those high-quality bikes are around us everyday and taken for granted… With the production at overseas transplant factories continuously rising, the concept of domestically made motorcycles has already been changing, and such peculiar sense toward domestic motorcycles is probably going to change as well.”

Kenji Shibata has also painted a few cars, too—with just as much meticulousness as you’d expect from his caliber. While he loves painting vehicles and watching motorcycle races, he doesn’t actually ride that much. He currently has a 1974 Honda TL125 trials bike in the garage, but hasn’t run it in years, although he does fantasize about getting his hands on the all-new Super Cub C125.

Suffice it to say, we look forward to seeing what Kenji comes up with next. In the meantime, you can have your own little piece of Japanese motoring history in the form of one of his prints which can be ordered online through Seevert Works. Enjoy scrolling through his website, it’s a heart-tugging goldmine.

Buy Kenji’s Art Here

Follow Seevert Works on Facebook here.

1966 Honda S800

 

 

1967 Honda RA272 Formula 1 Car

 

1962 Honda CR110

1962 Honda CR93

Yamaha Art of Kenji Shibata aka Seevert Works

2010 YZR

1995 NSX Le Mans

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All Art & Photography Copyright ©2018 – Kenji Shibata aka Seevert Works

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The Spidi Beta Motorcycle Jacket – Italian Style With Modern Safety https://silodrome.com/spidi-beta-motorcycle-jacket/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 08:00:17 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84870 The Spidi Beta Motorcycle Jacket – Italian Style With Modern Safety

The Spidi Beta motorcycle jacket is a new design from the Italian company designed specifically for people who want a full array of protection when riding, without looking like a stormtrooper. Spidi pride themselves on their Italian design heritage, and it shines through on jackets like the Beta that look like the sort of thing...

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The Spidi Beta Motorcycle Jacket – Italian Style With Modern Safety

The Spidi Beta motorcycle jacket is a new design from the Italian company designed specifically for people who want a full array of protection when riding, without looking like a stormtrooper.

Spidi pride themselves on their Italian design heritage, and it shines through on jackets like the Beta that look like the sort of thing you might find on the rack at Hugo Boss or Ferragamo.

The Spidi Beta Motorcycle Jacket

The fitted three-quarter length Spidi Beta H2Out jacket has a waterproof twin-layer laminated outer with an H2Out® waterproof and breathable membrane with a special Teflon coating to promote water run off.

Inside the jacket you’ll find an 80 gram fixed thermal lining as well as a removable quilted waistcoat with hollow fiber 80 gram thermal insulation. Removable Warrior impact protectors (certified En1621-1 level 1) are fitted in the shoulders and elbows, and there’s a pocket ready for optional Warrior level 1 and level 2 back protectors. The removable thermal lining gives the jacket genuine three-season usability, a feature that many jackets claim but few live up to.

For keeping your devices safe and dry the jacket has two waterproof exterior pockets and two waterproof internal pockets, there are also knitted cuffs for comfort that are coupled with a water-repellent barrier.

The front zipper runs top to bottom, it’s covered with a waterproof flap that’s held down with press studs to prevent flapping at speed. Reflective zones are included in various locations on the jacket to keep you visible at night, and the jacket is Class A certified as PPE protective apparel for motorcycle use (Pr En 17092-4:201).

Sizes – Colorways – Ordering

Spidi are offering the jacket in sizes ranging from S right the way through to XXXL and you can have any color you like, so long as it’s dark blue. The optional back protectors can be ordered from the “Customize” section of the store listing, with the full-length Warrior 510 back protector retailing for $69.90 USD.

Buy Here

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Spidi Beta Motorcycle Jacket Model

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Honda eCub – A Honda Cub Electric Conversion Kit By Shanghai Customs https://silodrome.com/honda-cub-electric-conversion-kit/ Wed, 17 Oct 2018 12:01:54 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=85049 Honda eCub – A Honda Cub Electric Conversion Kit By Shanghai Customs

The Honda eCub is the electric bike we all wish Honda would build – they likely never will but that no longer matters as the team at Shanghai Customs have developed an all-inclusive kit that allows any Honda Cub owner to convert their gasoline-powered Cub into a 100% electric bike. The Honda Cub Electric Conversion...

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Honda eCub – A Honda Cub Electric Conversion Kit By Shanghai Customs

The Honda eCub is the electric bike we all wish Honda would build – they likely never will but that no longer matters as the team at Shanghai Customs have developed an all-inclusive kit that allows any Honda Cub owner to convert their gasoline-powered Cub into a 100% electric bike.

The Honda Cub Electric Conversion Kit

The Honda Cub is by far the most produced motor vehicle in history, with over 100 million manufactured. The reason for this popularity is a combination of an accessible price point, solid reliability, and bullet-proof build quality.

The great benefit of this global popularity is that you can buy a Honda Cub for reasonable money almost anywhere in the world – making it perfect as the basis of an electrical conversion. Often these bikes are just in need of some work and since the Shanghai Customs kit provides all but the frame and forks, there are bargains to be found everywhere.

For the team at SH what appealed most about this project was the ability to reuse and repurpose (or upcycle) old Cubs rather than just crank out another Chinese electric scooter. On top of this, by creating a fully plug and play kit, they could make electric conversions accessible to people in a way they never have been before. As a result, they’ve built up a community of people from every corner of the world interested in converting their Cubs to electric.

Honda eCub - A Honda Cub Electric Conversion Kit

The Shanghai Customs eCUB Kit is an all-inclusive package that allows Honda Cub owners with basic mechanical skills and hand tools to convert from petrol to electric power in less than a day.

The benefits of electric power are twofold – maintenance requirements are almost non-existent and it only costs a few cents to fully charge your battery, there’s also no clutch or gears worry about making the eCub absolutely ideal for novices and experienced riders alike.

At its core the Shanghai Customs kit uses a high-end battery pack containing Panasonic GA 18650 3.7v 3500 mAh lithium-ion cells, and a 1000W electric motor mounted in the rear hub – capable of 2000W at peak which translates into a useable everyday speed of 45km/hr and a range of about 45km (28 mph and 28 miles). The average daily commute is almost exactly this same distance, though it’s split 50/50 as a round trip to and from work.

The eCub kit has a removable battery with a 4 hour recharge time, which makes it a great option for an everyday urban commuter. The full list of parts included in the kit is extensive, and we’ve listed it all below. The team at Shanghai Customs are happy to accommodate any special requests if you have a particular build in mind.

Honda Cub Electric

The Honda eCub Kit – Included Parts and Pricing

The team at Shanghai Customs spent over two years developing the eCUB kit to be the best quality plug-and-play electric conversion kit in the world. The painstaking process involved 3D scanning, CAD design, rapid prototyping CNC as well as their own molding and tooling. They focused on quality and longevity rather than penny pinching and the resulting kit has a professional fit and finish unlike almost anything else in the electric motorcycle/scooter world.

The goal from the outset was to keep costs as affordable as possible for people who want an electric motorcycle but can’t afford the $8,000 to $16,000+ USD MSRP attached to most of them. Many mass-production electric scooters are retailing for more than the cost of this kit, making the conversion both an affordable and practical option for those of us who like to wrench on our own bikes.

Due to the ubiquitous (and affordable) nature of the Honda Cub it was chosen as the chassis, and the eCub kit was developed to bolt on to the Cub, requiring less skill and patience than you need to assemble the average Ikea wardrobe.

Honda eCub Electric Motorcycle Parts

The full parts list of the Honda eCub consists of the following:

Electrical Parts

– A Panasonic GA 18650 3.7v 3500 mAh lithium-ion battery pack
– A 1000W electric hub motor, capable of 2000W at peak
– A 20 amp DCDC converter
– Switch gear and indicators
– A front headlight and mounting hardware
– An electronic three-wire throttle paired with a matching left grip
– An LED flasher
– A controller (50 amp continuous, 120 amp peak)
– An alarm and keyless entry (pre-wired)
– Connector boxes (pre-installed)
– Remote keys (pre-installed)
– A 4 amp charger
– A digital display and mounting hardware
– A rear brake light and indicator strip
– The full wiring loom
– Front indicators

Structural Parts

– Front and rear wheels (the rear contains the electric motor)
– The battery box frame mount/lock adapter
– A rear disc brake, adapter, cord and front lever
– A front brake lever
– The top unit
– The swing arm and adapters
– Rear shock absorbers
– Handlebars
– The top handlebar yoke
– Tire inners front and rear, and spoke rubber cover
– The controller bracket
– The bottom cover
– Foot rests
– A custom seat
– Screws, packers, and washers (all that are required for full build)
– Rubbers and 3M tape
– Top screw adapters
– Side covers (small)
– Swing arm axel flats and the rear brake caliper

The final MSRP for the kit is $2799 USD which includes shipping to your door, shipping lithium-ion battery packs around the globe can be an expensive undertaking due to the obvious safety concerns so having it included in the base price is a breath of fresh air.

The Honda eCub kit will fit all Honda C70 and C90 models from 1967 to 2003, and it’ll also fit the Honda C50 with some minor tweaks.

Get Yours Here

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Re-Purposed Oil Barrel Light Fixtures by Vibrazioni Art Design https://silodrome.com/oil-barrel-light-fixtures-vibrazioni-art-design/ Wed, 17 Oct 2018 07:00:09 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84822 Re-Purposed Oil Barrel Light Fixtures by Vibrazioni Art Design

Vibrazioni Art Design is essentially an Italian version of Daft Punk that builds custom motorcycles and homewares – all out of their workshop in the Emilia-Romagna region of Northern Italy near Bologna. The favorite canvas of the two men is oil drums, millions of which are made each year to transport oil and fuel, before being...

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Re-Purposed Oil Barrel Light Fixtures by Vibrazioni Art Design

Vibrazioni Art Design is essentially an Italian version of Daft Punk that builds custom motorcycles and homewares – all out of their workshop in the Emilia-Romagna region of Northern Italy near Bologna.

The favorite canvas of the two men is oil drums, millions of which are made each year to transport oil and fuel, before being either discarded or recycled.

These drums are typically painted with the company colors and insignia of their brand, and they’re made from steel – meaning that they’re ideal as a starting point to create other useful things like chairs, tables, light fixtures, and motorcycle fairings.

The light fixtures you see here are each made from a single barrel, cut into sections, reshaped, then joined together into a 6-sided acorn-like hanging light. Each is made largely by hand with minimal machine work in a process that the team behind V.A.D. is justifiably proud of.

Buy Here

Vibrazioni Art Design Lamp Petronas

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The Only One Ever Made – 1965 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake https://silodrome.com/ferrari-330-gt-2-2-shooting-brake/ Tue, 16 Oct 2018 09:01:18 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84914 The Only One Ever Made – 1965 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake

The Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake is a car with a remarkable history, it was designed by the two man American team of Bob Peak and Luigi Chinetti Jnr and hand-built by famed Italian coachbuilders Vignale. Only one would be made, and fatefully it would be the last car ever made by Alfredo Vignale who...

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The Only One Ever Made – 1965 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake

The Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake is a car with a remarkable history, it was designed by the two man American team of Bob Peak and Luigi Chinetti Jnr and hand-built by famed Italian coachbuilders Vignale. Only one would be made, and fatefully it would be the last car ever made by Alfredo Vignale who was tragically killed in a car accident.

The Ferrari 330 GT 2+2

The Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 was released in 1964 as a development of the 330 America, it featured quad headlights, an extended grille, and a 50mm longer wheelbase. A year later in 1965 a revised version was released with a more traditional twin headlight arrangement, alloy wheels instead of spoked, a 5-speed gearbox, and optional air conditioning and power steering.

The 330 GT 2+2 is possibly best remembered for the fact that it was John Lennon’s first car. The story goes that in February 1965 word spread around London that Lennon had just passed his driving exam. As a young man of almost unlimited wealth he was an ideal target for luxury car salesmen, and many of them rushed their latest and greatest sports cars to his opulent home in Weybridge, Surrey.

The Ferrari dealer was the only man with the foresight to bring a 2+2 model, knowing that Lennon had a young son named Julian, and that Lennon would need at least 3 seats. The dealer’s instinct was proven correct, and Lennon bought a brand-new Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 from him.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake

Bob Peak, Luigi Chinetti Jnr, And The Dream Of Bespoke Ferraris

In the mid-to-late 1960s Bob Peak and Luigi Chinetti Jnr were working on a company that would bring bespoke Italian coachbuilt cars to the Americans in an accessible way that had never been tried before.

Bob Peak was already a famous American commercial illustrator who’s work had been featured on the cover of Time Magazine, TV Guide, and Sports Illustrated. He created movie posters for West Side Story, My Fair Lady, and Camelot, before branching out into sci-fi and action films designing posters for the first 5 Star Trek films, Rollerball, Superman, The Spy Who Loved Me, Apocalypse Now, and many more.

Luigi Chinetti Jnr is the son of famed Italian-American Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti, Jnr grew up surrounded by Ferraris and racing drivers. He started out sweeping the floors in the shop and worked his way up – becoming a racing driver and car designer in his own right.

When Peak and Chinetti Jnr joined forces to develop what they hoped would be the first of many Ferraris with bespoke bodies they didn’t do things by halves. The design they came up with was cutting edge for 1967, and far more modern looking than the 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 it was based on. Sadly their enterprise never got off the ground, leaving it as one of those curious historical “what ifs”.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Rear

The 1965 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake

Space-age is a word that gets thrown around a lot, but when this car was first displayed on the Vignale Stand at the 1968 Torino Motor Show the term was used justifiably and frequently by attendees laying eyes on it for the first time.

The new Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake shared no exterior parts in common with the 330 GT 2+2, save for a part of each door, and the windscreen. The design was well ahead of its time, with lines that would have looked perfectly at home in the mid-1970s.

The sweeping hood is bordered on either side by elegantly creased fenders, the quad headlights are tucked discreetly behind louvres that are referenced slightly further back behind the front wheel arches. An unusual series of vents extend from the door centerlines up over the roof, and the glass house rear-end has a glass rear hatch – pre-dating the one used on the Volvo 1800ES by four years.

Under the hood the 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake is powered by the same 4.0 liter (3,967 cc) SOHC V12 Engine as the regular 330 GT, with triple Weber dual throat carburetors, a 5-speed manual gearbox, and 300 bhp at 6,600 rpm.

The car has attracted much attention over the years, counting Jay Kay of Jamiroquai amongst its former keepers. With the resurgence  of interest and popularity surrounding shooting brakes, this one has been popping back up on the radar more recently – widely regarded as one of the single finest shooting brakes in history.

If you’d like to take it home with you you’ll need to make your way to the RM Sotheby’s auction at the Petersen Automotive Museum on the 8th of December. There’s currently no estimate listened and you can click here to visit the listing if you’d like to see more of the car or register to bid.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Side

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Rear

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Rear 2

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Interior

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Interior

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Front

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Back

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Back 1

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake Wheel

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake V12 Engine

Images: Erik Fuller ©2018 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The post The Only One Ever Made – 1965 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Shooting Brake appeared first on Silodrome.

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The Bell MX-9 MIPS Presence Helmet – $159.95 USD https://silodrome.com/bell-mx-9-mips-presence-helmet/ Tue, 16 Oct 2018 07:00:01 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84579 The Bell MX-9 MIPS Presence Helmet – $159.95 USD

The new Bell MX-9 MIPS Presence Helmet makes use of the revolutionary Multi-Directional Impact Protection System, a technology designed to protect the brain from traumatic injuries caused by rotational energy. What is MIPS and how does it work? The Multi-Directional Impact Protection System (MIPS) was developed by Swedish neurosurgeon Hans von Holst in collaboration with...

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The Bell MX-9 MIPS Presence Helmet – $159.95 USD

The new Bell MX-9 MIPS Presence Helmet makes use of the revolutionary Multi-Directional Impact Protection System, a technology designed to protect the brain from traumatic injuries caused by rotational energy.

What is MIPS and how does it work?

The Multi-Directional Impact Protection System (MIPS) was developed by Swedish neurosurgeon Hans von Holst in collaboration with Peter Halldin, a researcher at the Royal Institute of Technology. After a few years of research the men founded MIPS AB in 2001 with 3 other specialists in the biomechanical field from the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden.

The company was founded to allow them to license their potentially life-saving design technology to helmet manufacturers in the hopes of saving both cyclists and motorcyclists from brain injuries caused by rotational acceleration/deceleration.

MIPS is a slip-plane system that can move 10 to 15 millimeters inside the helmet, thus mimicking the brain’s own built-in protection system. This layer is designed to rotate inside the helmet to slow or reduce the amount of energy transferred to or from the head/brain. Science shows that if you can reduce the strains associated with rotational acceleration, you’ll likely reduce the risk (and severity) of brain injury.

The Bell MX-9 MIPS Presence Helmet

This new version of the popular Bell MX-9 incorporates MIPS technology, inside a shell that also meets or exceeds both the DOT (USA) and ECE (Europe) helmet certification standards. The MX-9 has a lightweight polycarbonate shell that comes in three sizes to ensure you get the optimal shell for your head size.

For warm weather the MX-9 has a built-in velocity-flow ventilation system and a moisture wicking, removable and washable air channeled liner, an integrated vented roost guard, and importantly an EPS-lined chin bar.

Each Bell MX-9 helmet comes with Bell’s 5 year warranty and your choice of four colorways including matte black/white/red (shown), matte black/titanium, matte black/white, and matte black/flo orange.

Buy Here

Bell MX-9 MIPS Presence Helmet Collage

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The Jett Design x Motorelic Ducati 749 Custom Racer https://silodrome.com/ducati-749-custom-motorcycle/ Mon, 15 Oct 2018 09:01:40 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84774 The Jett Design x Motorelic Ducati 749 Custom Racer

The Ducati 749 and its larger sibling were designed by Pierre Terblanche, a name treated with universal and much deserved reverence in the motorcycling community. The Ducati 749 Though a globally respected marque, Ducati didn’t have the development budgets of the big four Japanese motorcycle companies back in the early 2000s. This meant they had...

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The Jett Design x Motorelic Ducati 749 Custom Racer

The Ducati 749 and its larger sibling were designed by Pierre Terblanche, a name treated with universal and much deserved reverence in the motorcycling community.

The Ducati 749

Though a globally respected marque, Ducati didn’t have the development budgets of the big four Japanese motorcycle companies back in the early 2000s. This meant they had to be clever when designing motorcycles, and ensure parts could be used on more than one model.

When it came time for Terblanche to design a pair of new Ducati superbikes with engine sizes of 1000cc and 750cc he chose to make essentially the same motorcycle with different barrels and heads. There are a few other differences of course, but not many.

Whereas the 999 has a bore x stroke of 100mm x 63.5mm the Ducati 749 has a bore x stroke of 90mm x 58.8mm. As a result, the 749 revs higher and the 5mm stroke results in a slight reduction of gyroscopic forces that some claim is noticeable in the corners.

Ducati 749 Custom

As with most modern Ducatis, the 749 has a tubular steel trellis frame that uses the engine as a stressed-member. Up front you’ll find a Showa “LR/RC” 43mm upside-down fully adjustable fork with a 24.5° rake, and in the rear a progressive linkage with a fully adjustable Sachs monoshock is fitted.

The engine is a double overhead cam, desmodromic L-twin with a 6-speed gearbox, and a dry multiplate clutch. Ducati list the power output as 108 hp at 10,000 rpm and 59.3 ft lbs of torque at 8,500 rpm.

Stopping power is provided by two 320mm discs up front with four piston calipers, and a single 245mm disc in the rear with a two piston caliper.

The Ducati 749 was sold from 2003 till 2007 when Ducati replaced it with the 848. The 749 remains a popular secondhand bike today, and an excellent alternative to similarly powered 600cc superbikes out of Japan.

Ducati 749 Custom 8

The Jett Design x Motorelic Ducati 749 Custom Racer

The 749 you see here has been comprehensively reworked by Jett Design and Motorelic to be the motorbike Terblanche might have built himself, if he hadn’t been hampered by the realties of mass-production.

The 749 project was a collaborative effort between Andrew of Jett Design and Sean of Motorelic, both talented custom motorcycle builders who share a passion for not just changing the way motorcycles look, but fundamentally improving the way they ride.

Andrew sourced a bone-stock 2005 Ducati 749 with only 5,000 miles on the odometer and the build began. The primary objective was to get the bike as light as possible so that both performance and handling would be improved, the secondary objective was to increase both horsepower and torque.

The rear subframe was one of the first parts to go, along with the factory seat and rear end. Sean set to work building a new subframe and seat from aluminum as a single piece for weight savings, the new tail has integrated LED tail lights and a low profile Alcantara seat made by Andrew.

Ducati 749 Custom 9

Attention now turned to the front of the bike, the original factory fairing was removed and heavily modified to save weight and simplify. One of the headlights was removed to shave weight further, the lower end of the fairing was discarded, and the upper fairing was significantly re-modeled.

With the bodywork complete the two men shifted focus to the engine. Sean crafted a pair of new high-performance exhausts with one exit out the lower right side and one exit out under the seat. A pair of Sprint air filters was added, a lightweight flywheel was installed (1.5 lbs), and a Yoyodyne dry slipper clutch was fitted.

The new exhaust and high-flow filters necessitated a dyno session to get the air/fuel ratios back in check. Additional performance enhancing parts include adjustable lightweight billet aluminum rear sets, a Superlight sprocket, an SB Electronics quick shifter, a Mupo adjustable steering damper, billet aluminum triple trees, a lightweight lithium battery, and a Penske rear monoshock.

The completed bike is notably quicker than it was in stock trim, and dare I say it looks better too, though to be fair the original Terblanche design has aged remarkably well over the intervening years.

If you’d like to see more from Jett Design and Motorelic you’ll find links to their websites below, as well as links to their social media.

Jett Design – WebsiteFacebookInstagram

Motorelic – WebsiteFacebookInstagram

Ducati 749 Custom 11

Ducati 749 Custom 10

Ducati 749 Custom 7

Ducati 749 Custom 6

Ducati 749 Custom Rear Tire

Ducati 749 Custom 5

Ducati 749 Custom Engine

Ducati 749 Custom Clutch

Ducati 749 Custom 3

Ducati 749 Custom Seat

Ducati 749 Custom Tank

Ducati 749 Custom 2

Ducati 749 Custom Headlight

Ducati 749 Custom 1

Ducati 749 Custom Tail

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