Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Wed, 17 Jul 2019 14:08:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 18077751 The Toma Customs Yamaha SR400 – A Minimalist Daily Rider https://silodrome.com/custom-yamaha-sr400/ Wed, 17 Jul 2019 11:01:11 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95839 On this project, our customer (Benjamin) first idea was to turn his Yamaha SR 400 into a British style “Between the Wars” inspired custom bike. He would use it mainly for his daily rides in Brussels to commute from home to his work at the European Commission.

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This article was written by Thomas Jeukens, founder of Toma Customs. When possible we like to bring you the story of a custom build in the words of the people who built it, to offer clear insight into their thought process and methods.

When we start a project, we first want to hear about the clients’ wishes and transformation ideas. It is a great opportunity for us to get to know our client and enables us to visualize what his dream bike would look like.

On this project, our customer (Benjamin) first idea was to turn his Yamaha SR 400 into a British style “Between the Wars” inspired custom bike. He would use it mainly for his daily rides in Brussels to commute from home to his work at the European Commission. He wanted the outlooks to be classic and elegant, and the use to be easy to ride on, and with a straight driving position. He also specified he wanted the custom to be subtle, not too flashy and matching his personality.

Yamaha SR400 Custom

When Benjamin came to the workshop for the first time with his bike, we took the necessary time to know him better. And after a long discussion about details he wanted, we realized that his initial idea of the project was not perfectly aligned with his personality, the potential of the bike and that it did not really match the DNA of our workshop.

So, we proposed him to spend a few more hours in the workshop in order to start from scratch the creative process, and disassemble some superfluous parts to see what potential was hidden behind his bike. After hours of discussion about style and possibilities for the project, we got into the vibe of his dream bike and we knew the exact outlook of how the bike should look like.

We realized that a project inspired by the 60s’ flat track racing motorcycles keeping an ‘urban’ spirit would best fit his personality and also better match our DNA. We made a small sketch of what we had in mind and he was directly seduced by the new direction of the project, he could already picture himself driving the bike. This is an amazing feeling you know, when you see you went beyond your client’s expectations and ideas. After that, we just know we have to make this a dream come true.

Yamaha SR400 Custom Rear

The only extra request that came out of the discussion and the we had to bare in mind during the project was to be able to create a removable extra seat as our client like to take his wife or kid for a ride during the weekend.

As Benjamin has is office not far away from the workshop, he came regularly to see the progress of the project and it allowed us to show him what we imagined for the next steps at each key stage of the project. He even came 2 times to try the saddle and the adjustments of the foam so it fits perfectly before we sewn the leather on it.

We love this kind of project and relationship with the customers, to take their ideas into account and try to achieve their dream motorcycle, even if sometimes it involves questioning their initial ideas and propose new directions for the project, if we feel it’s necessary and right. It’s really about this kind of experience that we want to evolve and bring our customers to, discussing details, sharing what we do, make them come to the workshop to live the project together, not just buying a product, but live an experience together and build the motorcycle of their dream.

Regarding the modifications, the first thing we went looking for was a way to align the tank with the frame. So, we modified the subframe and create new fasteners. Once the tank was in place, we shortened the rear part of the frame and started to work on the design and creation of the 2 saddles that we then sewed by our workshop. The finish and covering is in black leather.

Yamaha SR400 Custom Seat

We also modified the handlebars to allow a straight driving position, adapted the front fender and tailor-made the rear fender in a retro flat track spirit.

All the electronics components have been replaced by new and more minimalist elements (headlight, tiny led indicatorlights, taillights, speedometer). List of modification also includes the build of a bespoke plate holder and bespoke side covers.

List of Modifications:

– Modification of the rear part of the frame
– Aligned gas tank with the modified subframe
– Bespoke front and rear fenders
– Bespoke side covers
– Retro headlight
– New set of tiny led indicatorlights
– New flat track inspired handelbars
– Bespoke seat with black leather
– New speedometer
– Removed a lot of original accessories that were superfluous

Visit Toma Customs here

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Yamaha SR400 Custom Fuel Tank

Background on Toma Customs

TOMA is a Brussels-based custom workshop. We transform, customise and hand finish motorcycles to create unique and personalised machines.

Our artistic approach strives to extract the best potential of each bike and match the vision of their future owner’s. We aim to create unique, one-of-a-kind machines, with a clean and efficient style.
Our work mainly focuses on tracker, scrambler, flat track and bratstyle projects.
Customising goes hand in hand with transforming to us. We do not only modify bikes we give them a new life, a new look.

We always work starting with an older, existing base and then begin adding new parts (tanks, wheels, handlebars, lights). Given the complexity of certain projects, we often create and adapt some of these parts ourselves, especially when they’re metal.
Before we even get going, we spend a lot of time with the future-owners to see where they come from, what their interests are, where and how they grew up, their tastes, what they’ve been doing in life etc. All these elements, along with a ton of aesthetic and artistic research, allow us to create the motorcycle of their dreams.

About the Owner of Toma Customs

I’m the owner of TOMA CUSTOMS, my name is Thomas Jeukens.

2 years ago, I decided to leave my job as Strategy Manager for a big consulting firm to open TOMA CUSTOMS and fully live from my passion, transforming and customising motorcycles.
Mixing mental and manual activities generates a level of freedom and satisfaction that I’d never experienced before.

Working as a manager at a big consulting company enriched me personally and professionally, while it also made me grow and evolve as a person. Yet, I felt it was time for me to achieve one of my dreams and to fully live my passion: combining my intellectual abilities with creativity and manual work. That’s why I decided to turn my passion into my job.

Yamaha SR400 Custom Seat 2

Yamaha SR400 Custom Collage

Yamaha SR400 Custom Thomas

Yamaha SR400 Custom Thomas 2

Yamaha SR400 Custom Thomas 3

All Images: Robin De Nys

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Icon D3O Vest – 21st Century Spine + Back Protection – $225 USD https://silodrome.com/icon-d3o-vest/ Wed, 17 Jul 2019 11:00:52 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95732 D3O (pronounced “dee three oh”) is a modern viscoelastic body armor used by the armed forces, world class athletes, motorcyclists, snowboarders, and many others who need to protect themselves from impact injury whilst still remaining as flexible as possible. Long story short, D3O is soft to the touch, squidgy is probably the best word, but...

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(0 votes)
4.8 / 5 Reviewer
Pros
  • Very affordable at $225 USD
  • Excellent spine and back protection
  • Icon is a world-leader in armored motorcycle vest design
  • Cons
  • Currently only available in one colorway
  • No women's version is available yet
  • The Icon D3O Vest is the next generation of the American companies popular armored vests designed specifically for motorcyclists to be worn either on their own over a shirt, or under a non-armored motorcycle jacket.
  • The benefit of an armored vest with chest and back protection is that the armor remains firmly fixed to your torso in the event of an accident. Some jackets can twist or slide up in a crash, particularly when skimming along the asphalt, which significantly reduces their effectiveness.
  • Safety5
    Affordability5
    Comfort5
    Styling5
    Ventilation4

    D3O (pronounced “dee three oh”) is a modern viscoelastic body armor used by the armed forces, world class athletes, motorcyclists, snowboarders, and many others who need to protect themselves from impact injury whilst still remaining as flexible as possible.

    Long story short, D3O is soft to the touch, squidgy is probably the best word, but the molecules lock together in an impact to dissipate energy and protect you. Jackets and other motorcycle gear with D3O fitted tend to be less bulky and more comfortable that the equivalent gear with hard armor installed.

    At just $225 USD the Icon D3O Vest provides one of the best value propositions in the world of motorcycle safety, when paired with a great helmet of course. It’s made of injection molded D3O armor plates developed in a low profile design suitable for most jackets and race suits.

    The vest has adjustable shoulder straps and an adjustable waist to ensure you can tailor it to perfectly fit your torso. Importantly it also has an integrated emergency contact info badge and it’s certified according to Standard EN 1621-2 : 2014 – CE Level 2.

    A central “pull down” ID tag is fitted to the front section, allowing paramedics to quickly learn who you are and what allergies you may have, this is an excellent feature we’d like to see included in more motorcycle gear – particularly helmets.

    The Icon D3O Vest provides ample back protection, with armor extending from just below the neck all the way down to the tailbone. The broad back plate contains geometric channels for ventilation and airflow, it’s also designed to provide excellent protection for the posterior section of your ribs – another common injury in many motorcycle accidents.

    The front chest plate was developed to protect your breastbone and center chest area from frontal impact, another common injury area in head-on collisions, particularly with the side of a car that pulled out in front of you.

    Visit The Store Here

    Icon D3O Vest Front

    Icon D3O Vest Motorcycle Emergency Tag

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    The Lotus C-01 – A Rare 200 hp Superbike – Only 100 Were Ever Made https://silodrome.com/lotus-c-01/ Tue, 16 Jul 2019 10:00:40 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95778   Only 100 examples of the Lotus C-01 were built, it was a motorcycle that appeared to come out of nowhere in 2014 when it was announced by German racing team Kodewa (now ByKolles Racing), German motorsport and aerospace company Holzer Group, and acclaimed industrial designer Daniel Simon. The Lotus C-01 looks like no other...

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    Only 100 examples of the Lotus C-01 were built, it was a motorcycle that appeared to come out of nowhere in 2014 when it was announced by German racing team Kodewa (now ByKolles Racing), German motorsport and aerospace company Holzer Group, and acclaimed industrial designer Daniel Simon.

    The Lotus C-01 looks like no other motorcycle ever made, it’s powered by the same 1195cc liquid-cooled 75º V-twin engine used in the KTM RC8R. This engine has double overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, a 13.5:1 compression ratio, 90 ft lbs of torque, twin sparks, electronic fuel injection, and a 6-speed transmission.

    The motorcycle was built under official license from Lotus, but the British sports car maker had little if anything to do with the actual design and construction of the bike.

    Thanks to extensive use of titanium, a carbon fiber body shell, and an aerospace quality steel-trellis frame, the C-01 tips the scales at 181 kilograms dry, or 399 lbs. Everything about the bike is top shelf, including Öhlins twin shock absorbers at the rear Sachs forks up front, twin discs on the front end with 4-piston Brembo brakes, and the exceptionally lightweight 19 inch carbon fibre wheels front and back.

    Lotus C-01 Side 3

    The designer, Daniel Simon, drew from the iconic Lotus 49 for inspiration. This was one of the most important Formula 1 cars in history, the first powered by the Ford Cosworth DFV engine, that was itself made because Colin Chapman talked Ford into building it. The car won the title in its debut year of 1967 and would continue winning races right up into 1970, as many of the other teams scrambled to copy it.

    In the spirit of the Lotus 49, the Lotus C-01 has no electronic rider aids. There’s no ABS, no traction control, and no stability control. Much like its vintage F1 forebear, control of the motorcycle is entirely down to the human pilot.

    Daniel Simon is a former Bugatti designer who has become famous for his futuristic creations including the Tron Lightcycles from the 2010 film, and the “Bubbleship” used by Tom Cruise in the recent Universal sci-fi hit “Oblivion”.

    Whilst some commentators derided the original concept for its long wheelbase and 52º rake, the journalists who actually had a chance to ride it had overwhelmingly positive feelings about the Lotus and its handling. It has developed by two German companies famous for their work in Formula 1, DTM, Le Mans prototype racing, rally, and a slew of other racing series.

    Lotus C-01 Motorcycle

    This disconnect between guesswork based on visual appearance and actual on-road performance was similar to the reception of the Ducati Diavel. Initial spy shots of the prototypes were widely derided, but the media reception once people actually got to start riding it was mostly positive and occasionally effusive.

    The C-01 has been compared with the Diavel, as well as the new Royal Enfield Concept Kx which was possibly partially inspired by the Lotus.

    All of the examples of the C-01 that were built are now in the hands of their owners, they only seem to rarely come up for sale which is a possible indication that they’re fun to ride. The original asking price was $137,000 USD and it’s difficult to nail down what they’d be worth at auction, though due to the rarity and the Lotus name they’ll never be cheap.

    This Martini-liveried C-01 is due to roll across the auction block with Mecum in mid-August, there’s no estimate listed and if I’m reading the odometer correctly it’s got 0 miles on it. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

    Lotus C-01

    Lotus C-01 Tank

    Lotus C-01 Side

    Lotus C-01 Side 2

    Lotus C-01 Seat

    Lotus C-01 Martini Livery

    Lotus C-01 Handlebars

    Lotus C-01 Front Wheel

    Lotus C-01 Front 2

    Images courtesy of Mecum

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    An Original 1980s-Era OutRun Arcade Game by SEGA https://silodrome.com/out-run-arcade-game-sega/ Tue, 16 Jul 2019 08:30:50 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95630 This is an original SEGA OutRun Arcade Game from the mid-1980s. OutRun was the most successful SEGA arcade cabinet of the 1980s. It’s been referenced by many game developers that followed as a major inspiration, and it’s lent its name to the popular “Out Run” design movement that liberally utilizes ’80s era design language and...

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    This is an original SEGA OutRun Arcade Game from the mid-1980s. OutRun was the most successful SEGA arcade cabinet of the 1980s. It’s been referenced by many game developers that followed as a major inspiration, and it’s lent its name to the popular “Out Run” design movement that liberally utilizes ’80s era design language and music.

    The story behind the game is fascinating and worth a documentary unto itself, though sadly none has ever been made as far as we can tell. Most of the work that went into designing and developing OutRun was done by the legendary Yu Suzuki, who travelled to Europe and toured the continent for weeks in a rented BMW 520.

    He started in Germany, leaving Frankfurt for Monaco where he saw a Ferrari Testarossa and settled on using it as the primary car in the game. From Monte Carlo he travelled into Italy, stopping in Milan, Florence, and Rome. He then travelled through the the Swiss Alps and ended up over in the French Riviera.

    Once he got back to Japan he began development on the game with a very small team, they had just 10 months to get it ready to ship. The first order of business was finding a Testarossa, this was done and it was extensively photographed to aid the design of the in-game model.

    Many of us played OutRun as extensively as our meagre pocket money would allow in the 1980s, for the uninitiated there’s a lengthy clip of game play footage above. The game consists of driving a Testarossa of speeds approaching 300 km/h on wide public roads and avoiding other cars, undulating terrain is used to mask hazards, and unusually for the era, the game allows you to choose your own music.

    A variety of both sit down and stand up arcade cabinets were developed and shipped around the world, they invariably proved amongst the most popular in the arcade parlour – giving young boys and girls the chance to drive a Ferrari with reckless abandon was always going to be a recipe for success.

    This original 1980s-era OutRun cabinet is the upright variety with two pedals, a steering wheel and a high/low gear shifter. It’s in working condition and retains its originality, making it very appealing to collectors, enthusiasts, and those of us with a hearty dose of nostalgia.

    There’s currently no estimate listed, but there’s also no reserve. It’s due to sell as part of the Taj Ma Garaj Collection in late September.

    Visit The Listing Here

    Out Run Arcade Game Screen

    Out Run Arcade Game Off

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    1957 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II – The Aston That Can’t Be Killed https://silodrome.com/aston-martin-db2-4-mk-ii/ Mon, 15 Jul 2019 10:45:31 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95693 This unique Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II is one of the most well-known surviving examples of its model line, it’s taken part in the modern Mille Miglia (2013) and it was at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este when it was seen by its current owner who bought it on sight. The Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk...

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    This unique Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II is one of the most well-known surviving examples of its model line, it’s taken part in the modern Mille Miglia (2013) and it was at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este when it was seen by its current owner who bought it on sight.

    The Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II

    The Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II was the second iteration of the DB2/4, itself an iteration of the DB2. The addition of the “/4” was to denote the 2+2 seating arrangement in the Saloon model, with one of the first uses of a hatchback rear on a car.

    Compared with the DB2 the DB2/4 has a curved windscreen, larger bumpers, repositioned headlights, and a slightly increased roofline to better accommodate the two people in the rear. As with its predecessor it uses an aluminum alloy body on a steel frame, with independent front suspension, a live axle rear, drum brakes on all corners, a 4-speed manual transmission, and a front-mounted, double overhead cam straight-6 designed by none other than W.O. Bentley.

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Front Side

    Aston Martin built the DB2/4 and the DB2/4 MkII between 1953 and 1957, with the earlier model running from 1953 to 1955, and the latter from 1955 to 1957. Engine sizes and power outputs varied over the course of the model run but it started out at 2.6 litres with 125 horsepower and a 120 mph top speed, making it’s way up to a 2.9 litre unit capable of 165 horsepower.

    Approximately 764 cars were built in total, including the Saloon, the a Drophead Coupé, and the two-seat Fixed Head Coupé. The model was replaced by the Aston Martin DB Mark III in 1957 (technically called the DB 2/4 Mark III), which would itself be replaced by the Aston Martin DB4, then the Aston Martin DB5 which is the model made famous by Ian Fleming in his series of James Bond novels.

    The “Can’t Be Crushed” Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II

    The reason this DB2/4 Mk II is so memorable is because of its unusual looks. Whereas many of its siblings have pristine paint and immaculate interiors thanks to careful restorations, this car is different.

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Open

    It proudly wears every dent and ding from its long life, made all the more eye-catching by the fact that a previous owner had the aluminum body stripped of paint as part of an abandoned restoration. It was bought in its paintless state and given a very careful mechanical restoration by the team at Aston Martin specialists Kevin Kay. They went to great lengths to respect the wishes of the owner, and keep all of the patina on the body and interior in place while performing a concours-quality engine bay restoration.

    A few years after this in 2011 the car was in a winter storage facility when a build up of snow and ice caused the roof to collapse, causing significant damage to many of the parked cars including this one. The Aston was sent to RM Auto Restoration for repairs to the roof, it needed to be hammered back out but fortunately it was salvageable.

    The phrase “Can’t Be Crushed” was added to the base of the rear window, with matching “Carry On Regardless” added to either side of the roof above the doors. These catch-phrases have become a big part of the car’s personality, and they contributed significantly to its unique appearance along with the yellow bug screen on the hood and the David Brown tractor badge.

    The car is now due to roll across the auction block with RM Sotheby’s in Monetery in mid-August, it’s being offered without reserve and you can click here to read more about it or register to bid.

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Front

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Side

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Rear

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Rear Fender

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Interior

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Hatchback

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Grille

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Engine

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Brake Light

    Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Back

    Images: Rasy Ran ©2019 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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    Lum-Tec M82 – An American Watch With A Swiss Automatic Movement https://silodrome.com/lum-tec-m82-watch/ Mon, 15 Jul 2019 10:00:51 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95748   The Lum-Tec M82 is limited to 100 units worldwide, each is carefully assembled in Ohio with a Swiss-made automatic mechanical movement, and each is water resistant down to 200 meters or over 650 feet. Lum-Tec is a family-run, American-based company run by Chris Wiegand. Unlike many watch brands Chris lists his own email address...

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    The Lum-Tec M82 is limited to 100 units worldwide, each is carefully assembled in Ohio with a Swiss-made automatic mechanical movement, and each is water resistant down to 200 meters or over 650 feet.

    Lum-Tec is a family-run, American-based company run by Chris Wiegand. Unlike many watch brands Chris lists his own email address on the website and encourages people to contact him so he can answer questions and help where possible.

    With the M82, Lum-Tec wanted to develop a world-class, military-spec watch with a Swiss movement that was still affordable to the general population. This is a significant task given the cost of genuine Swiss movements, and the fact it can be remarkably hard to buy them given global demand.

    Lum-Tec M82 Swiss Automatic Watch Corner

    Each Lum-Tec M82 starts with a case made from 316L surgical-grade stainless steel with a fine brushed and polished finishing. It’s powered by a Swiss-made Sellita SW200 automatic movement with a 38 hour power reserve, 26 jewels, 28,800 bph, and a display including hours, minutes, seconds, and the date.

    The watch is topped with a curved sapphire glass with military-grade AR coating, a solid double diamond sealed threaded case back, a threaded crown with double diamond seals, and dial markers with MDV® Luminous Technology (grade X1) giving excellent nighttime visibility.

    Lum-Tec backs each of their watches with a 2 year warranty that covers any malfunction in materials and workmanship. Only 100 of these will be made and they’ve been selling fast, if you’d like to get one before they’re all gone hit the red button below to visit the store.

    Visit The Store Here

    Lum-Tec M82 Swiss Automatic Watch Back

    Lum-Tec M82 Swiss Automatic Watch Side

    Lum-Tec M82 Swiss Automatic Watch Night

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    Desert Racing Documentary: Toby Price And The Finke Desert Double https://silodrome.com/finke-desert-double/ Sun, 14 Jul 2019 13:47:11 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95804 Finke Desert Double is a free 31 minute documentary about Toby Price and his goal of taking both the motorcycle and truck wins at Australia’s most famous off road race – the Finke Desert Race. Toby Price has rapidly risen to become one of the most successful off road motorcycle racers in the world over...

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    Finke Desert Double is a free 31 minute documentary about Toby Price and his goal of taking both the motorcycle and truck wins at Australia’s most famous off road race – the Finke Desert Race.

    Toby Price has rapidly risen to become one of the most successful off road motorcycle racers in the world over the past few years. He shocked the field in 2015 when he won Stage 12 of the Dakar and finished 3rd overall, even though he was racing in a support role for the KTM team. He returned to win the Dakar outright the following year, then again in 2019 with a broken wrist.

    In recent years Price has been competing in both off road racing trucks and motorcycles, which has given rise to his ultimate challenge – winning both the two and four wheeled runnings of the Finke in a single year, back to back.

    In order to do this he needs to qualify for both races, then win the bike race. At the finish line a plane is waiting to fly him back to the start line with just a few hours to eat, drink, change into his race suit and climb into the truck.

    I’m not going to give away the ending here, suffice to say it’s a great story and it offers a unique insight into the life of one of the leading off road racers in the world.

    TOBY PRICE AND THE FINKE DESERT DOUBLE 6

    TOBY PRICE AND THE FINKE DESERT DOUBLE 3

    TOBY PRICE AND THE FINKE DESERT DOUBLE 2

    TOBY PRICE AND THE FINKE DESERT DOUBLE 4

    TOBY PRICE AND THE FINKE DESERT DOUBLE 5

    TOBY PRICE AND THE FINKE DESERT DOUBLE 1

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    An Original Porsche Helicopter Engine – The Ultimate 356 Outlaw Engine Swap? https://silodrome.com/porsche-helicopter-engine/ Sat, 13 Jul 2019 09:30:45 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95393 It isn’t common knowledge that Porsche sold a significant number of modified 356 engines to the Americans for use in helicopters, including both the XRON-I Rotorcycle (or YRON-I) and the US Navy’s QH-50 DASH (Drone Anti-Submarine Helicopter). The horizontally opposed 4-cylinder Porsche engine was perfect for small helicopter use, it’s an air-cooled motor built with...

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    It isn’t common knowledge that Porsche sold a significant number of modified 356 engines to the Americans for use in helicopters, including both the XRON-I Rotorcycle (or YRON-I) and the US Navy’s QH-50 DASH (Drone Anti-Submarine Helicopter).

    The horizontally opposed 4-cylinder Porsche engine was perfect for small helicopter use, it’s an air-cooled motor built with fastidious German attention to detail, and they offer excellent reliability if maintained properly. Reliability is paramount when the alternative is a fall of thousands of feet to an unforgiving Earth.

    The engine you see here is model number Y0-95-6, it was used in a vertical orientation in the XRON-I Rotorcycle, a one-man helicopter with twin counter rotating rotors made of laminated wood. Yaw control is provided by rotor tip mounted “tip brakes” providing differential torque between the rotors and interestingly, the engine oil is pressurised and pumped into the mast for lubrication and cooling.

    The Rotorcycle was designed to fulfill a number of military roles including special forces tactical manoeuvres, observation, reconnaissance, and it was developed to be parachute dropped to downed airmen behind enemy lines to assist with their escape.

    The XRON-I Rotorcycle was adapted into the QH-50 DASH (Drone Anti-Submarine Helicopter), this was the first operational unmanned helicopter designed for a combat role, and a precursor to modern military drones.

    The Porsche Y0-95-6 helicopter engine you see here has a capacity of 1600cc, 55 hp, and it powered a pair of 17 foot rotors. Other engines were also used including a 55 hp Solar YT62 turbine model, a 72 hp Porsche YO-95-6 engine capable of powering 20 ft rotors, and a 62 hp Solar T62 gas turbine engine.

    These Porsche Y0-95-6 helicopter engines can be rebuilt for use in cars with minimal work by a marque-specialist. It’s difficult to imagine a better engine choice for an Outlaw 356, or one with better bragging rights than an ex-US Navy reconnaissance Porsche helicopter engine from the 1950s.

    This engine is due to cross the auction block with RM Sotheby’s in late September, there’s currently no estimate attached to it, and you can click here to read more or register to bid on it.

    Porsche Helicopter Engine 2

    Porsche Helicopter Engine 1

    Images: RM Sotheby’s

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    The Unusual Ner-a-Car Motorcycle – “Near A Car” In More Ways Than One https://silodrome.com/ner-a-car-motorcycle/ Fri, 12 Jul 2019 10:01:56 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95573 The Ner-a-Car, known as the Neracar in the United States, was a revolutionary motorcycle design from 1918 that could very well have forever changed the trajectory of motorcycle design and engineering. As it stands today the Ner-a-Car was the most prolifically manufactured motorcycle with hub-center steering right up to the modern day, with over 15,000...

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    The Ner-a-Car, known as the Neracar in the United States, was a revolutionary motorcycle design from 1918 that could very well have forever changed the trajectory of motorcycle design and engineering.

    As it stands today the Ner-a-Car was the most prolifically manufactured motorcycle with hub-center steering right up to the modern day, with over 15,000 produced between England and the USA.

    The list of the specifications of the Ner-a-Car are genuinely impressive, particularly for the era in which it was built. A low-slung steel-channel chassis (that did away with the need for expensive steel tubing) was used for the platform, hub-center steering is installed in place of regular forks, a reliable and fuel efficient engine was fitted capable of over 70 mpg, it also has twin coil spring front suspension, and a friction drive transmission that functions in a similar way to a CVT.

    Ner-a-Car

    Although it wasn’t built for speed, the Ner-a-Car was ridden across the United States by the legendary Erwin “Cannonball” Baker in 1922 from Staten Island, New York to Los Angeles, California. The journey of 3,364.4 miles took him 174 hours and 1 minute, or approximately 7.25 days. It’s important to note that there were very few paved roads in the United States at the time, most roads were essentially just dirt tracks for horses and carts.

    Due to its reliability, comfort, and fuel efficiency the Ner-a-Car was a slew of medals in long-distance road trials, perhaps the most famous of which was the team prize in the 1925 ACU 1000 mile Stock Machine Trial.

    The original Ner-a-Car was developed in the United States by Carl Neracher, from his first name he took the letters “Car” and the “Nera” from his surname, he then reversed them to create “Neracar”. Spoken aloud this is pronounced “Near A Car” which is exactly what the motorcycle was intended to be, a two wheeled car with as many of the conveniences from automobiles as possible rolled into a far more affordable motorcycle.

    Ner-a-Car Racing

    Neracher’s design was essentially an improved iteration of the 1911 Detroit Bi-Car Co, and he officially licensed the concept from the Bi-Car president John J. Chapin. Although it was designed in the United States by an American, the Neracar was first production built in the United Kingdom under license by Sheffield-Simplex in 1921.

    Finding American investors proved difficult, but for Europeans the Neracar was ideal, it was economical and its large front and rear fenders offered excellent protection from mud and puddles.

    Production in the USA would kick off in the early 1920s based out of Syracuse, New York. American examples of the motorcycle were initially fitted with a 221cc two-stroke engine with the British version getting a the same engine until it was replaced with the Blackburne four-stroke 348cc engine in 1925.

    Although the Brits produced 6,500 vs the 10,000 or so made in the United States, the continual upgrades applied by the Sheffield-Simplex engineers saw a series of models released with steadily increasing engine power, rear suspension, bucket seats with air cushions, and a fairing with an adjustable Triplex windshield.

    Neracar Vintage

    Due to the ease of operation and the fact the Neracar could be ridden by people wearing dresses and other clothing less conducive to regular motorcycles the model became popular with lady riders, country nurses, and clergymen. Women had only been allowed car and motorcycle licenses since 1918 (in the UK), and 1920 (in the USA), so the Neracar was uniquely positioned in the market, and much of their early advertising was aimed at newly upwardly mobile women, who were getting their first taste of solo freedom on the road.

    The 1922 Ner-A-Car you see here is one of the 285cc British-built examples with distinctive twin headlights and a longitudinally mounted license plate on the front fender. Impressively it comes with a large amount of history dating all the way back to Miss Alice Webb who bought it in 1929. It’s now being offered for sale via Bonhams with a copy of the Western Gazette, an original manufacturer’s brochure, and a current V5C document.

    It’s due to roll across the auction block on the 7th of September with an estimated hammer price of £7,000 to £9,000. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

    Ner-a-Car Side

    Ner-a-Car Details

    Ner-a-Car Front Suspension

    Ner-a-Car Engine

    Ner-a-Car Right Side

    Ner-a-Car Chassis

    Ner-a-Car Top + Side

    Ner-a-Car Erwin Cannonball Baker

    Ner-a-Car Ad

    Images courtesy of Bonhams

    The post The Unusual Ner-a-Car Motorcycle – “Near A Car” In More Ways Than One appeared first on Silodrome.

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    A Vintage Grand Prix Pinball Machine From 1976 by Williams https://silodrome.com/grand-prix-pinball-machine-vintage/ Fri, 12 Jul 2019 06:00:26 +0000 http://silodrome.com/?p=95546 The Grand Prix pinball machine was designed and built by Williams Electronics between 1976 and 1977. Over the course of this year they built 10,554 examples which were shipped around the world, with most ending up in the United States and Europe, but some machines have been discovered in Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. Unlike...

    The post A Vintage Grand Prix Pinball Machine From 1976 by Williams appeared first on Silodrome.

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    The Grand Prix pinball machine was designed and built by Williams Electronics between 1976 and 1977. Over the course of this year they built 10,554 examples which were shipped around the world, with most ending up in the United States and Europe, but some machines have been discovered in Japan, Australia, and New Zealand.

    Unlike many pinball machines made from the 1980s onwards the the Grand Prix pinball machine uses an electro-mechanical system of solenoids and other more traditional elements, rather than printed circuit boards and ECUs. The upside to this is that specialists tend to find them a little easier to repair, and they get the nod of approval from traditional pinball purists too.

    It’s possible that the machine was inspired by the movie “Grand Prix” from 1966, the city used on the backboard is Monaco, obviously famous for its appearance of the Formula 1 calendar, and for having one of the most challenging races of the year with very little in the way of run off areas.

    Grand Prix Pinball Machine by Williams Top

    Drivers travel at high speed within inches of the barriers, any contact is usually race ending, and wealthy race attendees often view the spectacle from the decks of their multi-million dollar motor yachts moored in the harbour.

    Although there were over ten thousand examples of the Grand Prix pinball machine made it’s not known how many have survived to the current day. We do know that there are at least 137, however the real number is likely quite a bit higher than that as it’s taken from a pinball owners registry.

    Pinball machines and other classic arcade games have made a huge comeback in recent years so we expect this relatively rare machine to attract plenty of attention when it crosses the auction block with RM Sotheby’s in September. There’s currently no estimate attached to it, and it’s being offered without a reserve.

    Visit The Listing

    Grand Prix Pinball Machine by Williams

     

    The post A Vintage Grand Prix Pinball Machine From 1976 by Williams appeared first on Silodrome.

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