Rally – Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Fri, 19 Oct 2018 11:43:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 The German Rally Unicorn: An Original Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Racer https://silodrome.com/porsche-959-paris-dakar/ Mon, 17 Sep 2018 08:01:12 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=83856 The German Rally Unicorn: An Original Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Racer

The Porsche 959 is remembered a technological tour de force that forever changed the direction of supercar engineering, but in a wonderful twist of fate this pristine supercar was modified for rally, and sent off to compete in the world’s toughest race – the Paris-Dakar. The Porsche 959 The project to design and build the...

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The German Rally Unicorn: An Original Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Racer

The Porsche 959 is remembered a technological tour de force that forever changed the direction of supercar engineering, but in a wonderful twist of fate this pristine supercar was modified for rally, and sent off to compete in the world’s toughest race – the Paris-Dakar.

The Porsche 959

The project to design and build the Porsche 959 started with a conversation in 1981 between Porsche’s Chief Engineer Helmuth Bott and the then-new Porsche Managing Director Peter Schutz. Bott knew they needed to do something significant to update the Porsche 911 to keep it competitive and Schutz agreed.

Bott also knew that the quickest way to fast-track engineering was to race the car against the best competition in the world, making improvements and upgrades throughout the season.

He realized that the newly minted set of Group B regulations for sportscar racing and rallying introduced in 1982 would be perfect for the Porsche 959, as they required only 200 vehicles produced annually for homologation purposes, and the restrictions on engineering and vehicle specifications were exceedingly minimal.

So convinced that Group B was the future of the project that the prototype development program was named Gruppe B.

Helmuth Bott and his team of engineers went all out on the design of the prototype, they recognized that this was the car that would likely shape the future direction of the company, and they rolled a staggering array of futuristic technology into the new car.

The unibody shell was made from steel, with aluminum alloy and Aramid (Kevlar) used in many of the body panels, a Nomex floor was developed, and a complex all-wheel drive system dubbed Porsche-Steuer Kupplung (PSK) was created – an advanced computer-controlled system capable of dynamically changing torque distribution between the front and rear differentials.

The engine was based on the power unit used in the Porsche 935/78 Moby Dick race car (and several other race cars), a sequential twin-turbocharged flat-6 with double overhead cams, 4-valves per cylinder, Bosch Motronic 2.1 fuel injection, with water-cooled heads and air-cooled cylinders.

This engine has a total displacement of 2849cc, and the car has a 5-speed gearbox plus a gelände (terrain) off-road gear, as well as reverse. With 444 hp on tap and 369 ft-lbs of torque, the Porsche 959 is capable of 0-62mph in 3.7 seconds, with a top speed of 197 to 211 miles per hour depending on variant.

As it happened, Group B evolved to be far more focused on rallying than sports car racing, and the series was shuttered by the FIA in 1986. This left the Porsche 959 with unable to compete in its destined series, but Formula 1, Le Mans, and Can-Am winner Jacky Ickx struck upon the idea of modifying the 959 for the Paris-Dakar Rally, and amazingly he managed to convince Porsche to actually do it.

Although no one knew it at the time, it would be the Paris-Dakar Rally entries that would overwhelmingly define the competition life of the Porsche 959.

The 1985 Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Racer

The project to race the 959 in the Paris-Dakar Rally began with three 911s that were modified with a series of 959 parts. Despite the fact it was their first attempt Porsche won the event, providing significant encouragement to race again the next year.

For the 1985 Paris-Dakar Porsche built three special 959s but it proved to be more of a development year with the largely new cars that were still very much pre-production prototypes. Rather than using the twin-turbo engine intended for the production 959 they used a version of the naturally-aspirated 3.2 liter Porsche 911 Carrera engine with 230 hp, a decision made to reduce complexity.

The three cars failed to finish but a year later in 1986 Porsche built three more after learning the lessons from the ’85 event. The 1986 cars would take both first and second place, forever cementing the Porsche 959 as a Paris-Dakar Champion.

In all just 6 Paris-Dakar specification 959s were built, and they almost never come up for sale. As a result of this they’ve become almost mythical creatures to the global car community. RM Sotheby’s will be offering the car shown here, currently the property of none other than Jacky Ickx, at their Porsche 70th Anniversary Sale in Atlanta on the 27th of October.

There’s currently no official estimate attached to the car but you can expect that whatever it is it’ll end in “illion”, if you’d like to see more of the car or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Engine

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Interior

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Front

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Wheel

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Cooler

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Right Side

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Left Side

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Rear Side

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Velocity Stacks

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Front

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Back

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Exhaust

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Window

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Fuel Tank

Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Back

Images: Robin Adams ©2018 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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Period Paris-Dakar Rally Competitor – The Gilles Francru Suzuki DR650 https://silodrome.com/period-paris-dakar-competitor-1993-suzuki-dr650-gilles-francru/ Tue, 04 Sep 2018 09:01:00 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82941 Period Paris-Dakar Rally Competitor – The Gilles Francru Suzuki DR650

This modified Suzuki DR650 was piloted in the 1994 running of the iconic Paris-Dakar Rally by French rider Gilles Francru – a veteran rider who had competed in the event multiple times. Interestingly it’s suspected that Francru actually rode this bike in the 1993 Paris-Dakar Rally as well, as it has the stickers from the...

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Period Paris-Dakar Rally Competitor – The Gilles Francru Suzuki DR650

This modified Suzuki DR650 was piloted in the 1994 running of the iconic Paris-Dakar Rally by French rider Gilles Francru – a veteran rider who had competed in the event multiple times.

Interestingly it’s suspected that Francru actually rode this bike in the 1993 Paris-Dakar Rally as well, as it has the stickers from the event and the mileage of 27,846 km matches the distance of two Paris-Dakar events not just the one – though this possible 1993 entry hasn’t yet been confirmed.

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally

The Suzuki DR650

The Suzuki DR650 was introduced in 1990 as a replacement for the out-going Suzuki DR600 model. Both bikes were remarkably similar, with the engines being essentially the same other than the increased bore and stroke of the DR650 to increase capacity.

Many off-road motorcycles make use of relatively simple, robustly designed single-cylinder engines and the DR650 is no different. It has a SOHC, four-valves, air and oil-cooling, a single carburetor, and a 5-speed gearbox.

Suzuki chose to stick with tried and tested designs with the model, including a tubular steel frame, heavy-duty traditional front forks, a monoshock rear, and single front and rear disc brakes. The kerb weight of the first generation DR650 is 170 kilograms and the engine produces approximately 46 hp at 6800 rpm, and 56.6 Nm at 5000 rpm.

The popularity of the Suzuki DR650 with motorcyclists around the world can probably be boiled down to two major factors – they’re relatively inexpensive to buy, and they’re almost impossible to break.

This popularity has led to the model remaining in production for almost 30 years, with the only thing likely to kill it off being its carburetor-fed engine, which can’t pass increasingly stringent emissions restrictions.

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Rear

The 1993 Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Bike Shown Here

This DR650 is a lot more special than most thanks to its Paris-Dakar Rally heritage, in fact the bike appears to be almost untouched since its last sojourn across the North African deserts in 1994.

The modern Dakar Rally takes place in South America due to the increasingly complex geopolitical safety concerns in North Africa, this has led to the original rallies of 1979 to 2007 being looked back on as a golden age, with many heroes made, and sadly many lives lost.

The 1994 Paris-Dakar Rally was unusual in that it departed Paris and made its way to Dakar, before turning around and returning to Paris, finishing at Euro Disney Resort (now Disneyland Paris). This would doubtless have meant a lot to French rider Gilles Francru as he crossed the finish line in 33rd place after watching countless fellow competitors fall by the wayside to injury, mechanical failure, or exhaustion. 96 motorcycles had started the rally, but just 47 crossed the finish line.

If you’d like to add a genuine Paris-Dakar bike to your own garage you’ll be able to bid on this one when it rolls across the auction block with RM Sotheby’s on the 5th of September in London as part of the Weird & Wonderful Collection.

If you’d like to read more about the bike or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Seat

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Seat 2

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Seat 1

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Road Book

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Front Wheel

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Fender

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Engine

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Dash

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Bash Plate

Images: Dirk de Jager ©2018 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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Documentary: Resurrecting Björn Waldegård’s Lancia Stratos https://silodrome.com/documentary-bjorn-waldegard-lancia-stratos/ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 03:01:33 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82675 Documentary: Resurrecting Björn Waldegård’s Lancia Stratos

All surviving examples of the Lancia Stratos are special, but the Björn Waldegård Lancia Stratos stands in a league of its own. This documentary by Patina features David Hanman telling the story of his discovery of the original Björn Waldegård Lancia Stratos in Italy a number of years ago. He describes the difficulties of having...

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Documentary: Resurrecting Björn Waldegård’s Lancia Stratos

All surviving examples of the Lancia Stratos are special, but the Björn Waldegård Lancia Stratos stands in a league of its own.

This documentary by Patina features David Hanman telling the story of his discovery of the original Björn Waldegård Lancia Stratos in Italy a number of years ago. He describes the difficulties of having the car restored in Italy, resulting in him bringing the car to England to have it resurrected by Rob Johnstone.

I won’t go into too much detail as the film is really worth watching, it’s a masterful piece by the team at Patina, and if you’re anything like me you’ll find yourself trawling the classifieds for a Stratos of your own, and pondering selling your house to afford it.

Björn Waldegård Lancia Stratos 2

Björn Waldegård Lancia Stratos 1

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Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato – The “Affordable” Zagato https://silodrome.com/lancia-fulvia-sport-1600-zagato/ Sat, 21 Jul 2018 04:01:01 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=81216 Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato – The “Affordable” Zagato

The Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato is the fastest and most powerful Fulvia ever made thanks to the 1.6 liter HF engine fitted where the smaller 1.3 liter engine had been in the earlier model. The Zagato badge is typically found on cars worth staggering sums, particularly if the car in question shares its DNA...

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Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato – The “Affordable” Zagato

The Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato is the fastest and most powerful Fulvia ever made thanks to the 1.6 liter HF engine fitted where the smaller 1.3 liter engine had been in the earlier model.

The Zagato badge is typically found on cars worth staggering sums, particularly if the car in question shares its DNA with a world-championship winning Italian sports car, but this isn’t the case with the Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato – they can still be had for somewhat affordable figures.

The Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato

1971 would see the introduction of the Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato, a new top of the line model from the Italian marque that would be sold alongside the slightly less expensive Sport 1.3. Both models feature the same eye-catching bodywork styled by legendary Italian designer and Chief Stylist at Zagato, Ercole Spada.

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Back

Spada’s other designs include what is possibly the most beautiful car of all time, the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato, as well as the Alfa Romeo Giulietta SZ, the original BMW 7 Series, the Ferrari FZ93, the Lancia Delta, and a long list of others, including the ill-fated Ford GT70.

The Sport 1600 Zagato was designed to be a lightweight, aerodynamic sports car based on the pre-existing Lancia Fulvia Sport coupe running gear. Each was built by Zagato for Lancia, with earlier versions having aluminum bodies, which were replaced by steel later in the model’s production run.

From a purely stylistic perspective, the Fulvia Zagatos were well-ahead of their time, they were first introduced in 1965 but their looks remained undated even when compared with modern production cars right through to the end of the 1970s.

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Front

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato – Engine + Running Gear

The engine sitting under the hood of the Lancia Fulvia has caused countless furrowed brows over the decades, it’s actually a V4 but with an incredibly narrow bank-angle. So narrow that it has a single head housing double overhead cams, with one cam opening all intake valves, and the other opening all exhaust valves.

The engine is canted to the side at a 45° angle for better centre of gravity and better hood clearance, with a pair of Solex carburetors mounted over the approximate centre-line of the engine bay. The first one of these engines had a displacement of just 1091cc and 58 hp, but multiple revisions including a shallower bank angle were built, with the final largest version having a capacity of 1584cc and up to 134 hp, with a top speed approaching 120 mph.

Earlier models had a 4-speed gearbox with later models (such as the one shown here) featuring a longer-legged 5-speed.

Unusually, the Lancia Fulvia was front-wheel drive, this offered it a considerable advantage in rally competition. Countless wins were enjoyed by the model, but the most significant was when it took the International Rally Championship for Lancia in 1972.

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Engine

The Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Shown Here

The car you see here was imported to the Netherlands in 1986 by a Dutch lady who was an active member of the Dutch Lancia Club. She loved the car so much she kept it for 25 years, and the car became very well-known in the Dutch Lancia community.

A Dutch architect bought the car in 2011 and gave the car a refurbishment including a full respray (glass and engine out). A pair of S1 Fulvia HF seats were installed, along with a Nardi steering wheel, and the original (troublesome) electric window mechanisms were swapped out for much better modern units.

Up front the original headlights were swapped out for Daytona-style headlights with perspex headlight covers, the original bumpers were removed, and the front wishbones were changed to HF 1600 units for more performance-oriented camber.

While the painting was underway the engine had its top end rebuilt, including the addition of a Group 4 inlet manifold and a pair of Dellorto DHLA 40 carburetors. A Group 4 competition exhaust manifold was also fitted and the flywheel was lightened and balanced, and a new aluminum radiator with an electric fan was installed to improve cooling.

The car is now for sale through Image Street Classics, if you’d like to read more or enquire after buying it you can click here to visit the listing.

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Front Main

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Interior

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Interior 1

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Tail Light

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Steering Wheel

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Side

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Seat

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Rear

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Rear Wheel

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Headlight

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Gauges

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Front Side

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Front 3

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Carburetor

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Back Side

Lancia Fulvia Sport 1600 Zagato Back 1

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The Lancia Stratos HF – The King of ’70s Rally https://silodrome.com/lancia-stratos-hf-car/ Tue, 17 Jul 2018 08:01:27 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=81133 The Lancia Stratos HF – The King of ’70s Rally

The Lancia Stratos was the first car designed specifically for top flight rally competition – developed by the all-Italian dream team of Lancia, Nuccio Bertone, and Marcello Gandini, with engines supplied by Ferrari. We remember the Stratos today as one of the most successful rally cars of its era, but its conception and development were...

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The Lancia Stratos HF – The King of ’70s Rally

The Lancia Stratos was the first car designed specifically for top flight rally competition – developed by the all-Italian dream team of Lancia, Nuccio Bertone, and Marcello Gandini, with engines supplied by Ferrari.

We remember the Stratos today as one of the most successful rally cars of its era, but its conception and development were fraught with difficulties, and it’s almost a miracle that the car made it both into production and onto the starting line of the great rallies of its day.

The Factory Gate and the Lancia Stratos Zero

The project to build the Lancia Stratos began when head of Gruppo Bertone Giuseppe “Nuccio” Bertone heard that Lancia were seeking to replace the aging Lancia Fulvia that they’d been using (with significant success) for rally competition.

Nuccio tasked the head designer at Bertone, Marcello Gandini, to pen a revolutionary new vehicle that would catch the attention of the big wigs at Lancia, and to ensure they were suitably impressed, he had the car built on the running gear of a Lancia Fulvia Coupé.

Lancia Stratos Zero

Above Image: The Lancia Stratos Zero

Gandini had already designed the revolutionary wedge-shaped Lamborghini Countach, and he continued down a somewhat similar path with the design for the Lancia Stratos Zero, albeit more extreme in its execution.

Once complete, the Lancia Stratos Zero was driven to the Lancia factory with Nuccio Bertone behind the wheel for its presentation – he stunned the awaiting Lancia management by driving the low-slung Stratos Zero right under the company boom gate.

Hands were shaken and a deal was made to develop a world-class racing car using the design direction of the concept car, and Marcello Gandini set to work almost immediately.

Lancia Stratos

The Lancia Stratos HF

The development of the Lancia Stratos HF was almost entirely unbridled by the constraints of a typical production car. It was penned by Gandini who was working closely with the sports division at Lancia to give them everything they wanted in a world-beating rally car.

The wedge and Kammback offered good aerodynamics, and great pains were taken to give the driver an almost perfect 180 degree panoramic view from the cockpit – thanks to a deeply curved windscreen that flows through slim A-pillars into the side windows. Rally cars spend a great deal of their time sideways, so this wide field of view is vital as it allows the driver to keep their eye on the road.

The core design was a central steel monocoque with front and rear sub-frames that bolt into place – this is ideal for cars that often suffer front or rear impacts, as you can remove the damaged sub-frame and replace it far more easily than you can repair or replace a full unibody chassis.

Lancia Stratos Interior

The engine was to be a modified version of the 2.4 liter Ferrari Dino V6, it took significant diplomacy to bring Enzo Ferrari around to this idea, as he was concerned about the Stratos competing with the sales of his own cars. In the end the wrinkles were smoothed out, and Enzo agreed to supply 500 engines – the exact number required to homologate the car for Group 4 racing.

Once unleashed the successes came thick and fast for the Stratos, it won the 1974, 1975, and 1976 World Rally Championship titles in the hands of Sandro Munari and Björn Waldegård, with additional wins in the 1975, 1976, and 1977 Monte Carlo Rally. The full list of wins enjoyed by the Lancia Stratos is far too long to list here – suffice to say the car was utterly dominant, and it ushered in a new era of rally car designed from the ground-up for rally competition.

The 1974 Lancia Stratos HF Stradale Shown Here

The car you see here is one of the nicest survivors left anywhere in the world, it’s an original example that hasn’t needed a restoration, largely due to the fact that it has just 6,440 kms on the odometer, and it’s always belonged to conscientious, fastidious owners.

Over the years the car has been carefully maintained, and today it presents in beautiful and fully-functional condition with its original paint, wheels, and interior (original seats accompany the car but were removed for preservation).

If you’d like to read more about this Stratos or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing on RM Sotheby’s.

Lancia Stratos Wheels

Lancia Stratos Spare

Lancia Stratos Side

Lancia Stratos Seats

Lancia Stratos Rear

Lancia Stratos Rear 2

Lancia Stratos Main

Lancia Stratos Logo

Lancia Stratos Engine

Lancia Stratos Dashboard

Lancia Stratos Back

Images: Erik Fuller ©2018 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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Original Prototype – Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto https://silodrome.com/ferrari-308-gtb-group-b-michelotto/ Fri, 22 Jun 2018 06:30:25 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=79165 Original Prototype – Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto

This is the original prototype of the Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto – it was the first one built and was a proof of concept that would prove remarkably successful in competition in its own right. Anyone familiar with either Ferrari or Group B rally is likely to raise an eyebrow when confronted with...

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Original Prototype – Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto

This is the original prototype of the Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto – it was the first one built and was a proof of concept that would prove remarkably successful in competition in its own right.

Anyone familiar with either Ferrari or Group B rally is likely to raise an eyebrow when confronted with a Ferrari built to Group B specification. Ferraris are famous for their speed but also for their frangible nature and Group B was the wildest, toughest, and one of the most deadly forms of motorsport in the world in the 1980s – so much so it was banned in 1986 after just 4 seasons and a slew of driver and spectator deaths.

Ferrari 308 GTB

The Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto

The Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto exists largely thanks to one man – Antonio Zanini, a 7-time national champion Spanish rally driver who recognized that the 308 GTB could be a Group B weapon with the correct upgrades. The Barcelona Ferrari agent agreed to supply him with a car, which he then took to factory-authorised performance tuner Michelotto.

Michelotto was a wise and perhaps obvious choice for Zanini, as the company had already modified a number of 308 GTBs for Group 4 racing.

For Group B the cars were fitted with rose-jointed suspension and up-rated Brembo brakes all round, Canonica wheels and Pirelli tyres as standard, Bosch K-Jetronic electronic fuel injection, a competition ‘quick change’ gearbox, lightened wishbones, stronger anti-roll bars, a quick-ratio steering rack, a competition clutch, and adjustable dampers on all four corners.

This switch to fuel injection combined with modified engine internals saw the horsepower of the 3 liter V8 go from 252 to 288 with the latter four-valve cars reaching 310.

The car shown here, chassis 18869, was the first of four cars built by Michelotto, from a total of 15 Group B and Group 4 cars that they built in-period. It’s the only one of the Michelotto Group B cars fitted with the original and proven”‘two-valve” engine, as opposed to the latter more complex Quattrovalvole unit that was used in the three cars that followed.

Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto

Chassis 18869

The competitive life of chassis 18869 was genuinely significant. It began competing in 1983 and immediately took a win at the Imperia Rally, followed by wins in four other races, followed by 1st in the 1983 Sicilian Rally Championship.

In 1984 Antonio Zanini drove the 308 GTB to a 3rd in the Targa Florio, followed by a win in the Critérium de Guilleres, as well as the Sierra Morena, the Luis de Baviera, the San Augustin Rally, the Vasco Navarro Rally, a second in the Oviedo Rally – winning the Spanish Rally Championship outright.

The car has been kept in private hands since it retired from motorsport, since 2014 it’s won five of the seven rallies it’s entered – proving to be no less competitive or successful than it was back in the 1980s. Due to its championship wining history, rarity, and historical significance there are very few vintage motorsport events that wouldn’t welcome chassis 18869 with open arms.

It’s due to roll across the auction block with Artcurial on the 7th of July with an estimated value of €800,000 to €1,000,000, and you can click here if you’d like to read more about it or register to bid.

Ferrari 308 GTB Switches

Ferrari 308 GTB Pedals

Ferrari 308 GTB Interior

Ferrari 308 GTB Front

Ferrari 308 GTB Front 3

Ferrari 308 GTB Front 2

Ferrari 308 GTB Electrics

Ferrari 308 GTB Dashboard

Ferrari 308 GTB Back

Ferrari 308 GTB 5

Ferrari 308 GTB

Ferrari 308 GTB Group B Michelotto

All images © Christian Martin courtesy of Artcurial

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The Porsche 953 INK Print – 1984 Paris-Dakar Rally Winner https://silodrome.com/porsche-953/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 05:00:20 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78425 The Porsche 953 INK Print – 1984 Paris-Dakar Rally Winner

The Porsche 953 The Porsche 953, sometimes referred to as the Porsche 911 Rally or the Porsche 911 4×4, is one of the most famous skunkworks 911s to ever depart the Stuttgart factory. The car started life as a regular 911 SC before undergoing a comprehensive rebuild in the hands of Porsche’s best and brightest....

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The Porsche 953 INK Print – 1984 Paris-Dakar Rally Winner

The Porsche 953

The Porsche 953, sometimes referred to as the Porsche 911 Rally or the Porsche 911 4×4, is one of the most famous skunkworks 911s to ever depart the Stuttgart factory.

The car started life as a regular 911 SC before undergoing a comprehensive rebuild in the hands of Porsche’s best and brightest.

The unibody shell was reinforced throughout to handle the brutal forces generated when racing in the desert, a new manually controlled four-wheel drive system was fitted, and bespoke suspension was developed and installed – giving the car its characteristic high ground clearance.

The Rothmans-liveried Porsche 953 took overall victory in the 1984 Paris–Dakar Rally driven by René Metge and co-driver Dominique Lemoyne, with Jacky Ickx finishing 6th, taking 9 stage victories along the way. A Range Rover V8 would take second, followed by a Mitsubishi Pajero Evolution.

Today we remember the 953 as the testbed for the legendary Porsche 959, it would be the 959 that would race in the Paris-Dakar in 1985, and a year later it would take a 1-2 finish.

The Porsche 953 INK Print

The 953 you see here has been painstaking recreated with no livery – to showcase the car itself. It’s the work of INK, an award-winning creative studio based in England, and they’ve created a series of prints called the “Plain Bodies” series.

Each poster measures in at A2 size and there’s a series of three in total, showing the 953 from the front quarter angle, the side, and the rear quarter.

Buy Here

Porsche 911 Rally Side

Porsche 911 Rally Rear

Porsche 911 Rally Detail

Porsche 911 Rally Side Detail

Porsche 911 Rally Rear Detail

Images courtesy of INK

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Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version https://silodrome.com/remote-control-datsun-240z/ Mon, 11 Jun 2018 04:01:35 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78041 Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version

This Tamiya 4×4 1:10 scale R/C car is based on the race-winning Datsun 240Z rally car used in the 1971 East African Safari Rally. The East African Safari Rally The East African Safari Rally was one of the most brutal, grueling motorsport events in the world. The race was founded in 1953 as the East...

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Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version

This Tamiya 4×4 1:10 scale R/C car is based on the race-winning Datsun 240Z rally car used in the 1971 East African Safari Rally.

The East African Safari Rally

The East African Safari Rally was one of the most brutal, grueling motorsport events in the world. The race was founded in 1953 as the East African Coronation Safari by two friends – Eric Cecil and his cousin Neil Vincent.

The two men wanted to race, but not at a circuit, as Vincent put it: “I can imagine nothing more boring than driving round and round the same piece of track, but if you will organise an event where we get into our cars, slam the door, go halfway across Africa and back and the first car home is a winner, I’ll be in it.”

The early rally route started in Nairobi, then went around Lake Victoria, through Uganda and Tanganyika and returned back into Kenya. The race was 3,852 miles long, and it ran over open land and dirt roads, with altitude changes from sea level to 10,000 ft, and temperature changes from 40+C to below freezing.

The 1971 running of the event saw 107 cars enter with purpose-built, Africa-proof rally cars, but just 32 crossed the finish line. Many have pointed to the East African Safari Rally as the godfather of the Paris-Dakar, and there’s no denying that it was one of the toughest single events in motorsport history.

In the 1971 race, the #11 Datsun 240Z of Edgar Herrmann and Hans Schuller took the overall victory, the class victory, the team victory, and the manufacturers championship – making Datsun the fist company to win all three categories two years running.

Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version Car

The Tamiya 1:10 Scale R/C Datsun 240Z Rally Version

The R/C car you see here is based on the Tamiya DF-03 chassis, it’s a 4×4 platform with double wishbone suspension front and rear (including adjustable upper arms and multiple attachment positions for dampers). It has a longitudinally positioned battery with the R/C unit on the rear, and ball differentials are installed in compact front and rear sealed gearboxes to prevent the incursion of dirt and debris.

Tamiya have fitted the Datsun with correct Rally Block Tires that are well-suited to off-road use, and the polycarbonate body comes with all the correct sponsor logos and car numbers used on the original 1971 rally car.

The original hood-mounted light pods are also included in the kit, as well as metal-plated front and rear bumpers, and paint to match the original.

The Tamiya Datsun 240Z has a length of 451mm, a width of 190mm, and a height of 138mm. The wheelbase is 251mm and the tires are 27x69mm. The chassis is a monocoque-tub which offers both low weight and excellent rigidity, when combined with the polycarbonate body, all-wheel drive, and the powerful RS540 electric motor, the car is a highly competitive R/C racer both on and off the asphalt.

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Tamiya 4x4 Chassis

Shekhar Mehta:Lofty Drews Datsun 240Z 1973 East African Safari Rally winner

The Datsun 240Z shown above is the car driven by Shekhar Mehta and Lofty Drews in the 1973 East African Safari Rally, this is the condition it was in when it crossed the finish line. The damage it sustained shows very clearly why most entrants never completed the event.

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Documentary: Malle Moto – The Forgotten Dakar Story https://silodrome.com/documentary-malle-moto-forgotten-dakar-story/ Sun, 10 Jun 2018 03:01:34 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78033 Documentary: Malle Moto – The Forgotten Dakar Story

Malle Moto – The Forgotten Dakar Story is a full-length documentary covering the remarkable entry of Lyndon Poskitt in the Malle Moto Class of the 2017 Dakar Rally. The Malle Moto Class isn’t particularly well-known outside of endurance rally circles, in the Dakar the Malle Moto Class is for riders who want to do the...

The post Documentary: Malle Moto – The Forgotten Dakar Story appeared first on Silodrome.

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Documentary: Malle Moto – The Forgotten Dakar Story

Malle Moto – The Forgotten Dakar Story is a full-length documentary covering the remarkable entry of Lyndon Poskitt in the Malle Moto Class of the 2017 Dakar Rally.

The Malle Moto Class isn’t particularly well-known outside of endurance rally circles, in the Dakar the Malle Moto Class is for riders who want to do the already difficult event on hard mode. Competitors in this class have literally no help from outside, no support crew, no mechanics, and certainly no massage therapists.

Malle Moto riders have to fix and maintain their bikes by themselves, they have to set up their own camp, cook their own food, and work out their own road books. Many of them only get 2-3 hours of sleep each night, and many of them never finish the event.

This documentary is an excellent look inside the Malle Moto Class at the modern Dakar Rally, and it’ll leave you wondering how on earth they do it. The Dakar is already the toughest rally in the world, and these guys make the normal competitors look a little soft.

If you’d like to follow more of Lyndon’s adventures you can subscribe to his YouTube channel here.

Lyndon Poskitt

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Documentary: The Greatest Years Of Rally – The 1970s https://silodrome.com/documentary-greatest-years-rally-1970s/ Sun, 29 Apr 2018 07:01:27 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=76572 Documentary: The Greatest Years Of Rally – The 1970s

The 1970s were a golden age in the world of international rally, it was just before the monsters of Group B would arrive and the cars being raced were far closer to their road-going counterparts. The heroes of the age include icons like the Ford Escort, the Porsche 911, the Datsun 240Z, the Alpine A110,...

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Documentary: The Greatest Years Of Rally – The 1970s

The 1970s were a golden age in the world of international rally, it was just before the monsters of Group B would arrive and the cars being raced were far closer to their road-going counterparts. The heroes of the age include icons like the Ford Escort, the Porsche 911, the Datsun 240Z, the Alpine A110, the Lancia Stratos, and many, many more.

This documentary covers the highlights of the decade from 1970 to 1979, the footage alone makes it worth watching, with remarkable aerial shots we’ve never seen before. The simplicity of top flight rally during this period is almost enviable – with fans often lining the stages standing on the wrong side of blind corners, seemingly trusting the drivers more than they probably should have.

With a total running time of approximately 1 hour and 20 minutes, this 480p resolution film is essential watching for even passing fans of rally. Depending on your screen size you may need to reduce the size of your web browser window which will shrink the film size automatically – the film might appear blocky on larger screens.

Ford Escort MK2 Rally Car

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