Motorcycles – Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Tue, 19 Jun 2018 01:17:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 Droog Moto Custom Yamaha FZ-09 – The MOTO 3 https://silodrome.com/custom-yamaha-fz-09-motorcycle/ Thu, 14 Jun 2018 05:01:23 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78159 Droog Moto Custom Yamaha FZ-09 – The MOTO 3

The Yamaha FZ-09 The Yamaha FZ-09 is an inline three cylinder motorcycle designed to compete squarely against the popular Triumph Street Triple. Although multi-cylinder engines with an odd number of cylinders are less common, the three cylinder configuration makes a lot of sense for motorcycle use as it’s smoother running than a parallel twin, and...

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Droog Moto Custom Yamaha FZ-09 – The MOTO 3

The Yamaha FZ-09

The Yamaha FZ-09 is an inline three cylinder motorcycle designed to compete squarely against the popular Triumph Street Triple. Although multi-cylinder engines with an odd number of cylinders are less common, the three cylinder configuration makes a lot of sense for motorcycle use as it’s smoother running than a parallel twin, and both lighter and narrower than a four cylinder.

The Yamaha FZ-09 product manager Shun Miyazawa and his team started from a blank slate with the new model, and they considered V-twins, parallel twins, triples, and fours. They settled on the triple configuration as the best all-rounder, the final engine has a capacity of 847cc, a compression ratio of 11.5:1, a bore x stroke of 78 mm × 59.1 mm, 115 hp at 10,000 rpm, and a 6-speed gearbox.

In order to keep weight as low as possible the frame and swingarm are both cast aluminum alloy. Each is cast in two pieces, the two halves of the swingarm are then welded together, and the two halves of the frame are bolted together, using the engine as a stressed member.

Since its release in 2014, the Yamaha FZ-09 has had a widely positive reception from the motoring press, and they’ve become a common sight on streets from LA to Sydney.

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

The Droog Moto Custom Yamaha FZ-09 – The MOTO 3

Droog Moto is a highly-regarded custom motorcycle garage based out of Washington State and run by an enterprising young guy named Max Droog – which makes him sound a little like a character from a Douglas Adams novel.

His latest build started as a stock 2014 Yamaha FZ-09 but underneath the original bodywork Max spied that it could be something completely different – a dual sport bike with chunky tires and a completely stripped back post-apocalyptic feel.

The build process started with a teardown to inspect the Yamaha’s frame – it was decided to build a new subframe to accommodate a new seat, to clean up the rear end of the bike significantly. All unnecessary body parts were discarded to reduce weight and clutter, but the original fuel tank was kept in place after the original paint had been removed and replaced with a clear coat.

The battery and electrical system found a new home up under the seat, out of the way of rain, mud, and debris. The original headlight was removed and swapped out for a tracker-style plate incorporating a small beak-fender, with 4 bright LED lights. The stock speedometer was relocated and a Droog Moto Bar was installed, with new grips.

The original wheels were removed and fitted with blacked-out aluminum inserts, then they were fitted with chunky Continental TKC80 tires. A custom 2” lift and updated oil pan were completed to aid in ground clearance when off-road, and a carbon M4 silencer with a re-worked exhaust system were installed, giving the bike a far more aggressive sound that the stock examples.

Max tells us that the completed bike rides like a beefy supermoto, with a comfortable upright riding position and surprisingly good road holding from the TKC80s. The MOTO 3 is currently for sale from Droog Moto, if you’d like to see more or enquire about buying it you can click here to visit the website.

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Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

Custom Yamaha FZ-09 Motorcycle

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The Metalbike Garage Custom BMW K1200RS https://silodrome.com/custom-bmw-k1200rs/ Tue, 12 Jun 2018 07:01:53 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78062 The Metalbike Garage Custom BMW K1200RS

The Metalbike Garage BMW K1200RS Metalbike Garage was founded by Simone Lecca after he left Gruppo Bertone – the storied Italian automotive styling, coachbuilding, and manufacturing company. Since Metalbike was founded 10 years ago, they’ve made a name for themselves via their signature aluminum bodywork – typically shaped using traditional tools and careful hand fettling....

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The Metalbike Garage Custom BMW K1200RS

The Metalbike Garage BMW K1200RS

Metalbike Garage was founded by Simone Lecca after he left Gruppo Bertone – the storied Italian automotive styling, coachbuilding, and manufacturing company.

Since Metalbike was founded 10 years ago, they’ve made a name for themselves via their signature aluminum bodywork – typically shaped using traditional tools and careful hand fettling.

The bike you see here is their latest build – it started life as a well-preserved BMW K1200RS, but its rebuild has been so significant that you’d have to look very carefully to decipher its origins.

Once the donor bike was rolled into the Metalbike Garage workshop a full teardown commenced, the plan was to see just how much of the bodywork could be removed, along with other superfluous parts, to reduce the weight of the 266 kilogram (586 lb) touring bike down to a more sporting level.

BMW K1200RS

Entirely new bodywork was then shaped from aluminum, with an interconnected fuel tank and seat base, the later of which sits on a new aluminum subframe. A new seat was then measured up and upholstered using cognac leather, following the downward curve from the fuel tank.

The underside of the fuel tank contours to accommodate a new fuel pump, and on the left side it has a cutaway section to allow space for the four air filter pods that feed down directly into the intake. All new instruments and lighting was sourced for the bike, with a strong focus on minimalism.

A new 4-into-1 exhaust manifold was fabricated in-house to make the most of the limited space available, it feeds back into a small muffler that exits on the lefthand side. A new set of handlebars were installed, with new grips and bar-end mirrors, and it was decided to keep the original (ample) brakes in place.

If you’d like to see more from Metalbike Garage you can visit their website here, or follow them on Facebook – or Instagram.

The BMW K1200RS

The BMW K1200RS was one of the most beloved long-range touring motorcycles of its time. That’s not to say it didn’t have its detractors, but period reviews are overwhelmingly positive and those who needed a premium tourer and could afford the sticker price of the K1200RS often had few other options.

As with all the K-series BMWs, the K1200RS was fitted with an inline multi-cylinder engine laid on its side, with the head on the left and the crank on the right. The engineers had chosen this layout as it significantly lowered the centre of gravity, and it left plenty of room up under the fuel tank for electrics, intakes, and other gubbins.

BMW K1200RS Rear Side

The sweeping aerodynamic bodywork of the K1200RS was characteristic of the 1990s, which should be no surprise given that it was originally released in 1997. The 1,171cc inline-4 is capable of a hearty 130 hp, and it sends power back to the rear wheel via a 6-speed gearbox and an enclosed driveshaft.

The engineers at BMW were arguably ahead of the curve on suspension design in the 1990s, and the K1200RS is a good example of this, with a monoshock rear-end and a telelever front – the latter of which often stops passersby in their tracks as they try to figure out how it all works.

Surviving examples of the BMW K1200RS are (fortunately) plentiful, and good examples can still be picked up for reasonable money. Despite the model’s growing age, it’s still an excellent touring motorcycle, and their owners are often reticent to sell them on.

BMW K1200RS Engine Intake

BMW K1200RS Front

BMW K1200RS

BMW K1200RS Body

BMW K1200RS Rear Side

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BMW K100 Retro Racer by Les Ateliers Du Dr Joë https://silodrome.com/bmw-k100-motorcycle/ Thu, 07 Jun 2018 06:25:34 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77884 BMW K100 Retro Racer by Les Ateliers Du Dr Joë

The BMW K100 The BMW K100 was the motorcycle developed by the German marque to take the fight to the new breed of Japanese inline-4s, whilst at the same time meeting the increasingly stringent emissions regulations in Germany. It was never likely that the Germans would copy the favorite engine layout of the Japanese that...

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BMW K100 Retro Racer by Les Ateliers Du Dr Joë

The BMW K100

The BMW K100 was the motorcycle developed by the German marque to take the fight to the new breed of Japanese inline-4s, whilst at the same time meeting the increasingly stringent emissions regulations in Germany.

It was never likely that the Germans would copy the favorite engine layout of the Japanese that had been largely pioneered by the Italians, an inline-4 mounted transversely in the frame with one or two overhead cams. Germans generally like to do things their own way, and as logically as possible.

Once the engineers at BMW had settled on an inline-4 with a shaft drive they set about planning the best possible engine layout. It was decided that the engine should be laid on its side, with the crank on the right and the head on the left, as this would allow the power from the crank to pass into the gearbox and out into the right-side shaft drive requiring only a single 90° bevel gear to power the rear wheel.

This flat-4 layout also gave the bike a low centre of gravity, and ample room for the intake system and radiator.

BMW sold the K-series in solid numbers, though never quite matching their Japanese counterparts. Over the course of its production run, the K-series would be offered in engine sizes from 750cc all the way up to 1300cc, and today they’re popular choice with custom bike builders due to their bulletproof engineering and unusual looks.

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

The Les Ateliers Du Dr Joë BMW K100 Racer

The K100 you see here has been through a full rebuilt at the hands of well-known tattoo artist and custom motorcycle builder based in the French Pyrenees mountains – Joël Alba, or as he’s known in tattoo circles, Dr Joë.

With this build he wanted to take a motorcycle that no one really associates with racing, and turn it into a bike that looks like it could have been built by the BMW Motorsport department in-period for competition use.

Once he had located and bought a good K100 work began with a full teardown. Once the engine was removed from the frame it was overhauled, and then set aside ready for re-fitting.

The frame was detabbed and a new subframe was fabricated to suit the new low-profile seat. The rear cowl, seat, fuel tank, fuel tank housing, front fairing and windshield were all made in-house by Joël, and he rather cleverly made use of a BMW Z4 indicator on either side of the fairing – something I think we may see emulated quite a bit on BMW builds going forwards.

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

The fuel tank is a feature that will have caught the attention of many, it’s a hand-made aluminum tank designed to fit neatly inside a bespoke fiberglass housing, the tank is fitted with a pop-up style Monza fuel cap, and it contains a non-standard fuel pump as the original BMW unit wouldn’t fit.

Joël kept the original alloy wheels in place but had them painted black, before sanding off the outer edges of the spokes. The frame, wheels, and forks were all painted with a long-lasting black epoxy paint, offset nicely with the white bodywork and unpainted metallic surfaces.

In order to change the front suspension geometry a Laverda triple tree was modified to fit, and new springs with a higher-performance fork oil were fitted. A higher-performance rear monoshock as sourced from the BMW catalogue, and a set of velocity stacks have been fitted to the intakes to help smooth airflow as it enters the engine.

Joël’s Dad is a mechanic, and his work influenced his son significantly as he grew up, so Joël decided to dedicate this build to his father- so he added his year of birth as the racing number (52). The build is a remarkable testament to what can be achieved with a BMW K100 and some talent, and Joël is proud of his support from BMW MINI pauTarbes.

If you’d like to see more of Joël’s work you can click to follow his official Facebook Page, or you can follow his Instagram here.

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Engine

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle

BMW K100 Custom Motorcycle Dr Joe

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Short Film Series: Isle of Man TT – Learn the Course https://silodrome.com/isle-of-man-tt-learn-the-course/ Tue, 05 Jun 2018 04:00:15 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78019 Short Film Series: Isle of Man TT – Learn the Course

If you’ve ever wanted to spend a lap aboard a superbike at the Isle of Man TT with no risk of putting yourself through a stone wall, this short film series is exactly what you’ve been waiting for. It was produced by the official Isle of Man TT folks, who’ve taken a full race-speed lap...

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Short Film Series: Isle of Man TT – Learn the Course

If you’ve ever wanted to spend a lap aboard a superbike at the Isle of Man TT with no risk of putting yourself through a stone wall, this short film series is exactly what you’ve been waiting for.

It was produced by the official Isle of Man TT folks, who’ve taken a full race-speed lap of the circuit onboard Bruce Anstey’s 600cc Honda and added onscreen markers to show you the corner names and highlights of the track over the full course.

It was filmed during Race 1 of the 2011 running of the TT, Bruce took both pole position (131.431 mph) and fastest lap (131.379 mph) in the Superbike TT.

A quiet spoken New Zealander, Bruce is a hugely popular veteran road racer, with 13 TT wins to his name, he’s also the former lap record holder on the world-famous Snaefell Mountain Course (17 minutes 6.682 seconds).

Amazingly, for 13 consecutive seasons (2002 to 2015) Bruce managed to secure a top three finish at the world’s three most prestigious road races – the North West 200, the Isle of Man TT, and the Ulster Grand Prix.

This hot lap of the Isle of Man course will have you white-knuckling your desk and wondering how they do it, I think it’s safe to say that most of us would struggle to manage a hot lap on an anaemic Italian moped without bottling it.

Part 1 of the series is above, with parts 2 and 3 below.

 

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First Issue: Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine https://silodrome.com/bike-exif-craftrad-magazine/ Sat, 26 May 2018 04:00:42 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77534 First Issue: Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

The team at Bike EXIF have just released their first ever print addition in collaboration with the high-respected European publication Craftrad. Bike EXIF is a moto website that you’re almost certainly already familiar with, they’ve been running for 10 years, and in that time they’ve become a critical cornerstone of the global custom motorcycle world....

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First Issue: Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

The team at Bike EXIF have just released their first ever print addition in collaboration with the high-respected European publication Craftrad.

Bike EXIF is a moto website that you’re almost certainly already familiar with, they’ve been running for 10 years, and in that time they’ve become a critical cornerstone of the global custom motorcycle world. Getting your custom onto Bike EXIF is the two-wheeled equivalent of winning an Oscar – in the decade since founding the site Chris Hunter and his team have helped launch countless careers, and scores of custom motorcycle garages.

Issue #1 of the new magazine is 146 pages long, featuring never before seen customs, in-depth articles covering Husqvarna Vitpilen 701, the life and times of Walt Siegl, BMW choppers in 1970s Hamburg, columns written by Chris Hunter, Ola Stenegärd and Paul D’orléans, and much more.

You can buy the first issue now for £12.00 and shipping to the USA and Canada is £4.00.

Buy Here

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Han Solo

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

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The Original Norton Commando Production Racer – The Yellow Peril https://silodrome.com/norton-commando-production-racer-yellow-peril/ Thu, 24 May 2018 09:01:59 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77501 The Original Norton Commando Production Racer – The Yellow Peril

The Yellow Peril The Norton Commando Production Racer was often colloquially referred to as the “Yellow Peril”. The bike would be offered as a road-legal factory racer to privateers and to well-heeled boy racers, so that the Norton factory could homologate the model for its own racing efforts. The first major victory for the Production...

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The Original Norton Commando Production Racer – The Yellow Peril

The Yellow Peril

The Norton Commando Production Racer was often colloquially referred to as the “Yellow Peril”. The bike would be offered as a road-legal factory racer to privateers and to well-heeled boy racers, so that the Norton factory could homologate the model for its own racing efforts.

The first major victory for the Production Racer was a win at the 1970 Thruxton 500 with Peter Williams and Charlie Sanby taking turns in the saddle, later the same year Williams would come within 1.6 seconds of winning the Isle of Man Production TT but he ran out of petrol on the last lap within sight of the checkered flag.

Cost-control was king at Norton in the late 60s and early 70s, so the Yellow Peril could never have been a bespoke design, it was very closely based on the production Norton Commando, but it each was built with the best performance parts of the day – giving an extra 12 bhp for a total of 70 bhp, with a top speed of over 130 mph.

Norton Commando Fairing

Norton Commando Production Racer Specifications

Each Production Racer was hand built at the Norton race shop by former AJS rider and senior development engineer Peter Inchley. Each of the air-cooled parallel twins was built using standard crankcases and a standard crank, with weight-matched connecting rods, a 3S racing camshaft, high-compression pistons, and shortened push rods.

The heads were individually selected from the regular production line, then ported and polished, fitted with larger valves in phosphor-bronze valve guides, and polished rockers.

When ordering your Production Racer you could specify either 32mm Amal GP or Concentric carburetors, the newfangled Boyer-Bransden electronic ignition (rather than the traditional points), and either a close-ratio 4-speed gearbox or the longer-legged Quaife 5-speed.

Suspension was modified specifically for the track, different wheels and tires were used, and a very attractive fairing, fuel tank, and seat were fitted – these are so beloved by the Norton faithful that’ve remained in production ever since by various companies in Britain and further afield.

It’s believed that fewer than 200 original Norton Commando Production Racers were built, making them one of the most highly sought after Commando model variants, if not the most desirable outright.

The 1969 Norton Commando Production Racer Shown Here

The Yellow Peril you see here is listed as a correct example by Mecum, the only two parts I can see that don’t seem factory original are the (single) Mikuni carburetor and Hagon rear shock absorbers, although it’s obviously common for these bikes to have had parts swapped out over the years.

It’s fitted with front and rear drum brakes as Norton didn’t introduce the front disc until later in the model’s run. It’s due to be offered by Mecum as part of the Jim Lattin Collection in Las Vegas on the 1-2 of June, there’s currently no estimated hammer price, so it’ll be interesting to see what it goes for on the day.

If you’d like to read more about this Norton you can click here to visit the listing on Mecum.

Norton Commando Tail

Norton Commando Production Racer - The Yellow Peril

Norton Commando Production Racer - The Yellow Peril

Norton Commando Front Brake

Norton Commando Gas Cap

Norton Commando Mikuni Carburetor

Norton Commando 750

Norton Commando Hagon Shocks

Norton Commando Engine

Norton Commando Engine And Gearbox

Images courtesy of Mecum

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The Slipstream Creations Retro Honda Enduro Chimera https://silodrome.com/retro-honda-enduro/ Wed, 23 May 2018 07:01:53 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77475 The Slipstream Creations Retro Honda Enduro Chimera

This article was written by James Fawcett, the founder of Slipstream Creations. When possible we like to bring you the story of a custom in the words of the builder, to give unique insight into their thought process and methods. This bike is a tribute to all those boxes of old parts and storage sheds full...

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The Slipstream Creations Retro Honda Enduro Chimera

This article was written by James Fawcett, the founder of Slipstream Creations. When possible we like to bring you the story of a custom in the words of the builder, to give unique insight into their thought process and methods.

This bike is a tribute to all those boxes of old parts and storage sheds full of discarded moto-ambition. Over the years I’ve accumulated plenty of extra parts, hanging on to them with the hope they’d come in handy someday. My 13-year-old son noticed the multiple Honda CB125S engines collecting dust, CL125 exhaust, an SL125 tank and fenders, and XR80 frame.

His imagination started putting the pieces together (figuratively), and then we decided to put the pieces together (literally). Our goal was to create a machine with vintage enduro styling, and a touch of Honda Grom attitude. The results are this super fun little SL/CL/CB/XR 125 thumper mashup.

While the general form factor of the parts from all these donor bikes made them seem like a decent match, actually fitting them together required a silly amount of custom fabrication and even more finesse. The XR80 frame was heavily customized to carry the CB125 engine. The rear subframe was custom made to bring the overall proportions of the bike to a more adult scale.

We lengthened an XR100 swingarm  to provide a slightly longer wheelbase, and to make room for 18” wheels and dual sport tires in the front and rear. An SL125 tank and front fender hint at some retro lines. A matching rear fender was hand made out of carbon fiber to flow with the custom subframe. A custom fabricated skid plate and front light plate round out the bodywork, along with a custom seat pan and upholstery.

Retro Honda Enduro

Next up was the electrical system, which we upgraded to 12 volts. LED brake lights were integrated into the subframe tubing, and dual off-road LEDs were added up front. The custom handlebar switch housings were cast out of epoxy and machined to accommodate the kill switch and independent controls of both front lights, with the wiring neatly routed through the handlebars.

The SL125 tank was mounted at a much more forward angle than the original design from the early 70’s. This helped the unique lines of the tank flow into the frame, but it also meant relocating the petcock to a much more forward position in order to draw fuel from the lowest point of the tank. The tri-tone red and orange paint adds another retro touch, mimicking the scallop design on many old Hondas of that era, and was laid out to accentuate the lines of the SL125.

The small tweaks and custom bits required to achieve a cohesive look are too numerous to mention, but we’re glad we did it. Everything on the build — from metal and carbon fiber fabrication, paint and powder coating, and even seat upholstery — was done in-house, with help and a little creative direction from my son Eddy. In the end, this bike is pure fun to ride. Give it a kick — it fires right up and sounds great. We couldn’t be happier with how it turned out. It won’t get you anywhere fast, but you’ll get there with a smile.

Here’s a short list of some of the things that were done to this bike:

– Modified tank and front fender from a Honda SL125
– Modified monoshock frame, with custom subframe and extended swingarm
– Custom fabricated electronics tray mounted under seat
– Custom fabricated seat pan and custom seat cover
– Hand made carbon fiber rear fender
– Custom skid plate and front light plate
– CL125 scrambler exhaust with stainless steel cone muffler
– 18” wheels with stainless steel spokes and dual sport tires
– 12v conversion with LED lighting and custom handlebar switch housings
– LED brake lights integrated into subframe tubing
– New piston and cylinder along with a top-end refresh
– Mikuni carburetor
– Custom designed and painted tank graphics
– All of the little, big details

If you’d like to see more work from Slipstream Creations you can click here to visit their website, and you can follow them on Instagram here or Facebook here.

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Slipstream Creations

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Honda Logo

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Honda Enduro Tank

Retro Honda Gas Tank

Retro Honda Enduro Handlebars

Retro Honda Enduro Controls

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Limited Edition Michel Monteange Print – Refueling at the 33rd Bol d’Or – 1969 https://silodrome.com/michel-monteange-refueling-33rd-bol-dor-1969/ Fri, 18 May 2018 07:00:22 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77256 Limited Edition Michel Monteange Print – Refueling at the 33rd Bol d’Or – 1969

This famous photograph by Michel Monteange shows the pit crew of the Gauthier and Schaller team at the 1969 Bol d’Or endurance motorcycle race held at the Autodrome de Linas-Montlhéry just outside of Paris. The most immediately noticeable element in the image is the cigarette hanging from the mouth of the no-nonsense chap in the...

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Limited Edition Michel Monteange Print – Refueling at the 33rd Bol d’Or – 1969

This famous photograph by Michel Monteange shows the pit crew of the Gauthier and Schaller team at the 1969 Bol d’Or endurance motorcycle race held at the Autodrome de Linas-Montlhéry just outside of Paris.

The most immediately noticeable element in the image is the cigarette hanging from the mouth of the no-nonsense chap in the tartan beret pouring the fuel from an old milk jug. The proximity of the cigarette to the petrol has raised many an eyebrow over the years, and it would likely result in the entire scene being blasted with fire extinguishers in any modern pitlane.

The original photographer, Michel Monteange, has partnered with Sails & Rods to produce a very limited edition run of prints of this photograph. Just 50 will be made from the original negative, and you can order sizes from 20x30cm up to 80x120cm.

Buy Here

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XTR Pepo Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker https://silodrome.com/harley-davidson-sportster-street-tracker/ Wed, 16 May 2018 07:01:16 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77259 XTR Pepo Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker

The Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker The Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker is by far the best American motorcycle that isn’t actually in production. Custom motorcycle garages like XTR Pepo make light work of turning a stock Sportster into a handsome, nimble, and fast street tracker – but the Harley-Davidson factory in Milwaukee has been very slow...

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XTR Pepo Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker

The Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker

The Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker is by far the best American motorcycle that isn’t actually in production.

Custom motorcycle garages like XTR Pepo make light work of turning a stock Sportster into a handsome, nimble, and fast street tracker – but the Harley-Davidson factory in Milwaukee has been very slow to actually release a factory version despite huge public interest.

Strong rumors abound that the designers at Harley have been working feverishly on a new street tracker based on the liquid-cooled 500/750cc line, and many in the motorcycling world are waiting with baited-breath to see if it actually happens, as there’s a strong chance it could help reverse the declining fortunes of the storied American motorcycle manufacturer.

XTR Pepo

XTR Pepo is a Madrid-based garage run by Pepo Rosell, funnily enough Pepo didn’t start out as a bike builder, he’s a trained biologist who previously worked on fish farms before turning his two-wheeled hobby into a full-time business.

The XTR Pepo Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker

This build started with a brand-new 2018 Harley-Davidson Sportster 883, once the bike had been rolled into Pepo’s workshop the teardown began.

The engine was the first order of business, it was stripped and rebuilt to 1200cc, with ported heads, high-compression pistons, a high-performance camshaft, and a new Mikuni race carburetor. Ignition is now handled by a Screaming Eagle unit, and the engine breathes in through a high-flow wire mesh air cleaner, and out through a two-into-one Supermario exhaust.

Once the engine was ready, attention turned to the frame. The original twin shock rear end was removed and Pepo fabricated a bespoke monoshock set up, using a custom-built Hagon shock absorber. The front received similar treatment, the factory-stock forks were removed and replaced with a set of Suzuki GSXR 750 upside down forks and their calipers, matched with new NG brake rotors.

The original fuel tank and seat were removed to make way for a modified Yamaha SR500 fuel tank, and a handmade seat that was fabricated in-house by Pepo, with a seat upholstered in tan suede. Custom cropped fenders were installed front and back, with a bespoke tail light tidy.

The stock oil tank was kept in place, and painted in the same grey hue as the fuel tank. A new headlight was installed and fitted with a mesh stone guard, and a set of Rizoma handlebars, capped off with Motogadget gauges.

Last but not least, Pepo removed the belt drive and swapped it out for a chain drive, with a new lightened rear sprocket, and a lightened sprocket cover up front.

The completed bike is a testament to what a factory Sportster Tracker could be, and it’s hard to imagine any Harley dealership in the world managing to keep them on the showroom floor for more than five minutes before selling out entirely.

If you’d like to see more from XTR Pepo you can click here to visit the official website, or click here to see all the other bikes from the Spanish garage that we’re previously featured on Silodrome.

Images: Cesar Godoy

The post XTR Pepo Harley-Davidson Sportster Street Tracker appeared first on Silodrome.

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The Original Jackson 5 Custom Honda ATC70 Three Wheeler https://silodrome.com/jackson-5-honda-atc70-three-wheeler/ Tue, 15 May 2018 07:01:01 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=76987 The Original Jackson 5 Custom Honda ATC70 Three Wheeler

This Honda ATC70 three wheeler was sent from the American Honda Motor Company to the Jackson 5 – 6255 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California on the 3rd of April 1973. The Jackson 5 and Michael Jackson in particular had a well-known love for motorcycles and there are many period images of the family riding bikes...

The post The Original Jackson 5 Custom Honda ATC70 Three Wheeler appeared first on Silodrome.

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The Original Jackson 5 Custom Honda ATC70 Three Wheeler

This Honda ATC70 three wheeler was sent from the American Honda Motor Company to the Jackson 5 – 6255 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California on the 3rd of April 1973.

The Jackson 5 and Michael Jackson in particular had a well-known love for motorcycles and there are many period images of the family riding bikes – on both two wheels and three.

This particular Honda ATC70 isn’t a stock factory bike – it was built specially for the Jacksons with a multitude of chrome parts, custom paint, and a license plate that reads “Jackson 5”.

The Honda ATC70 Three Wheeler

The 3-wheeled ATC models by Honda started production in 1970, they founded the market for off-road trikes and a number of other manufacturers followed – though none saw the same success. The initial model was the ATC90, called the US90 until Honda secured the “ATC” trademark, it stood for “all-terrain cycle”.

In 1973 the ATC70 was introduced, it featured a slightly smaller 4-stroke, air-cooled, 72cc single-cylinder engine but due to its price and its more approachable power-level it was a common purchase for families – the ATC70 could be ridden by both kids and adults.

Honda sold astonishing numbers of their ATC powered-trikes, and over the years that followed they would bump up the engine capacity to over 200cc – although how advisable it is to ride one of these quickly on uneven surfaces became sadly apparent to many owners, with injuries and even fatalities being all too common.

In 1987 a consent decree was achieved between all of the three-wheeler manufacturers and the Consumer Product Safety Commission to switch production to four-wheeled quad bikes for safety, and the age of the iconic ATC drew to a close.

The Jackson 5 Custom Honda ATC70 Three Wheeler

The Jackson 5 Custom Honda ATC70 three wheeler shown here is coming up for auction with Julien’s on the 19th of May, the estimated hammer price is between $10,000 and $12,000 USD. This is obviously a lot for a 70cc three wheeler, but due to the fact that it was custom built by Honda America for the Jackson 5, it’s a significant collectible.

If you’d like to read more about the ATC70 or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing on Julien’s.

Michael Jackson

Jackson 5 Family

Jackson 5

Jackson 5 Invoice

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