Japanese – Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Mon, 15 Oct 2018 13:14:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 Yamaha XSR 700 Twin Street Fighters By Gasoline Motor Co. https://silodrome.com/yamaha-xsr700/ Fri, 05 Oct 2018 10:01:50 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=84607 Yamaha XSR 700 Twin Street Fighters By Gasoline Motor Co.

The Yamaha XSR700 is about as close to a modern descendant of the original Yamaha XS650 as we’re ever likely to see, and much like its original forebear, the XSR 650 makes light work of urban commuting, highway riding, and the occasional cross-country excursion.  The Yamaha XSR700 The Yamaha XSR700 shares more than just a brandname with the...

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Yamaha XSR 700 Twin Street Fighters By Gasoline Motor Co.

The Yamaha XSR700 is about as close to a modern descendant of the original Yamaha XS650 as we’re ever likely to see, and much like its original forebear, the XSR 650 makes light work of urban commuting, highway riding, and the occasional cross-country excursion.

 The Yamaha XSR700

The Yamaha XSR700 shares more than just a brandname with the XS650 – both motorbikes are parallel twins with overheads cams (albeit just one on the old bike) developed by Yamaha to target riders spanning from absolute beginners to hardened saddle warriors.

While the XS650 engine is one of my own personal favorite parallel twins of all time, the far more modern XSR700 benefits from over four decades of engineering advancements. With its relatively low price point of $8,499 in the USA, its semi-retro styling, and its broad versatility, the XSR700 has become a common sight on the road – and deservedly so.

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Yamaha XSR700 – Power – Weight – Specifications

With a factory-claimed 74 hp and 50 ft lbs of torque, the 410 lb Yamaha XSR700 is very much a mid-weight, mid-power machine that you can ride to work all week, then ride out into the mountains on the weekend. The engine capacity is actually 655cc not 700, and it has double overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, and liquid-cooling.

The engine has a bore/stroke of 78 x 68.6 mm, a compression ratio of 11.0:1, and and electronic ignition with electronic fuel injection. The transmission is a constant mesh 6-speed paired with a wet multi-plate clutch, and the final drive is by chain.

The XSR700 uses its engine as a stressed chassis member, the engine also provides the front mounting point for the monoshock. The frame is a tubular steel backbone type that Yamaha calls a “diamond chassis”. Front brakes are dual 282 mm discs with monobloc four-piston calipers, and the rear is a 245 mm disc with a single piston caliper – ABS comes and standard.

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The Gasoline Motor Co. Yamaha XSR700 Twin Street Fighters

The twin custom examples of the Yamaha XSR700 you see here were built by the world famous Gasoline Motor Co. based in Sydney, Australia.

The founder of Gasoline is a friendly guy named Jason who’s been doing this sort of thing since most of us were in short pants. He runs a team at their South Sydney headquarters made up of some very talented mechanics and engineers, and on any given day they’ll have over 150 motorcycles in stock dating from the 1960s right through to the modern day.

Their most recent project saw the team at Gasoline take two XSR700s and build a pair of matching twin street fighters. Impressively the rear subframe is custom fitted in-house by Gasoline with the seat height carefully matched to the client – giving a better seating position than stock and it’s arguably looking better too.

Besides the subframe the Gasoline Twins benefit from a new JVB Moto headlight, rubber fork gators, motogadget electrics, pinstriped wheels that are preformed in-house, Rizoma foot pegs and hand controls, an SC projects exhaust, motogadget mirrors, and a Gasoline-designed top clamp with an integrated minimalist Moto Scope Mini Speedo.

Though the stock XSR700 is a handsome bike, the Gasoline Twins are better looking still in my book. In fact they’re probably about as close to a perfect urban daily rider as you’ll find anywhere in the world.

If you’d like to see more from the Gasoline Motor Co. you can click here to visit their website, or follow them on social media below.

Follow Gasoline Motor Co. on InstagramFacebookYouTube

Helmets supplied by Premier Helmets Australia

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Yamaha XSR 700 Custom Motorcycle 3

Yamaha XSR 700 Custom Motorcycle 2

Yamaha XSR 700 Custom Motorcycle 1

Photography: Rob Hamilton

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Yamaha SC500 – The Original Japanese Motocross Widowmaker https://silodrome.com/yamaha-sc500/ Thu, 20 Sep 2018 10:01:30 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=83941 Yamaha SC500 – The Original Japanese Motocross Widowmaker

The Yamaha SC500 was a motocross bike that quickly became world famous for its exceptionally challenging handling. Talented riders could barely tame it, but most others were left either flying off the back or popping accidental power-wheelies every time they crashed into the razor thin power band. The Yamaha SC500 When it was launched in 1973...

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Yamaha SC500 – The Original Japanese Motocross Widowmaker

The Yamaha SC500 was a motocross bike that quickly became world famous for its exceptionally challenging handling. Talented riders could barely tame it, but most others were left either flying off the back or popping accidental power-wheelies every time they crashed into the razor thin power band.

The Yamaha SC500

When it was launched in 1973 the SC500 was Yamaha’s first swing at building an “Open Class” motocross racing bike. The engine is a single-cylinder two-stroke with a capacity of 496cc and a compression ratio of 7:1, and it’s capable of 44 bhp at 6500 rpm.

As with many two-strokes, particularly those from the 1970s, the power band was explosive. Coupled to a kerb weight of just 107 kilograms (235 lbs) the hair-trigger-on-off switch throttle resulted in a motorcycle that was a handful to ride, perhaps best described by Rick Siemens below:

“YAMAHA SC500 SCRAMBLER. Another four-speed brute, this 1973-’74 two-stroke single ran hot, detonated fiercely, stalled constantly and seized regularly. After testing the bike, I noted: “It’s gray and black; so is a turkey.” Brutally fast, the SC-500 was cursed with state-of-the-dark forks and a pair of chromed shocks that would have faded on a busy barroom door.”

“It shook its steering head like a dog coming out of a swimming pool and the rear end hopped around like the frame had a hinge in the middle. All things considered, the only thing this bike did right was not leak around the gas cap.” – Rick “Super Hunky” Siemens of Dirt Bike Magazine

Yamaha SC500

After just two years Yamaha released the monoshock YZ360 which was widely loved and solved many of the inherent problems with the design of the Yamaha SC500. As a result of its reputation and the rapid pace of development in the motocross world in the 1970s most SC500s were scrapped, junked, or left to rust.

As a result of this neglect the model is now becoming semi-rare, particularly in immaculately restored condition. Over the intervening years many of the models shortcomings have been addressed, meaning they can now be rebuilt into far more manageable bikes.

Yamaha released Technical Bulletin No. 348 that recommended adding a small condenser that controlled the spark advance curve and made the bike much more rideable for non-professionals.

Yamaha SC500 Motocross

The Yamaha SC500 Shown Here

The beautifully restored Yamaha SC500 you see here is in as-new condition, and it’s undoubtably one of the best examples of the model in the world. Though not as loved as the YZ360 the SC500 does represent an interesting time in the history of two-stroke motocross and it does deserve a place at the table. Particularly as they can now be made to ride rather more predictably and tamely than they were back in 1973 and ’74.

The SC500 you see here is for sale via Bonhams at the Alexandra Palace Sale on the 23rd of September with an estimated value of £5,000 to £7,000, making it a great buy considering its condition and rarity, not to mention the kudos you’d get rolling it up to a vintage enduro or motocross event to race it.

Those that know of the SC500 know of its widowmaker reputation, so anyone capable of riding it (albeit a tamed version of it) is likely to be viewed with McQueen-like adoration. If you’d like to read more about the bike or register to bid you can click here.

Yamaha SC500 Rear Wheel

Yamaha SC500 Front Wheel

Yamaha SC500 Engine

Yamaha SC500 Rear Wheel 2

Yamaha SC500 Engine

Images by Bonhams

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Period Paris-Dakar Rally Competitor – The Gilles Francru Suzuki DR650 https://silodrome.com/period-paris-dakar-competitor-1993-suzuki-dr650-gilles-francru/ Tue, 04 Sep 2018 09:01:00 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82941 Period Paris-Dakar Rally Competitor – The Gilles Francru Suzuki DR650

This modified Suzuki DR650 was piloted in the 1994 running of the iconic Paris-Dakar Rally by French rider Gilles Francru – a veteran rider who had competed in the event multiple times. Interestingly it’s suspected that Francru actually rode this bike in the 1993 Paris-Dakar Rally as well, as it has the stickers from the...

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Period Paris-Dakar Rally Competitor – The Gilles Francru Suzuki DR650

This modified Suzuki DR650 was piloted in the 1994 running of the iconic Paris-Dakar Rally by French rider Gilles Francru – a veteran rider who had competed in the event multiple times.

Interestingly it’s suspected that Francru actually rode this bike in the 1993 Paris-Dakar Rally as well, as it has the stickers from the event and the mileage of 27,846 km matches the distance of two Paris-Dakar events not just the one – though this possible 1993 entry hasn’t yet been confirmed.

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally

The Suzuki DR650

The Suzuki DR650 was introduced in 1990 as a replacement for the out-going Suzuki DR600 model. Both bikes were remarkably similar, with the engines being essentially the same other than the increased bore and stroke of the DR650 to increase capacity.

Many off-road motorcycles make use of relatively simple, robustly designed single-cylinder engines and the DR650 is no different. It has a SOHC, four-valves, air and oil-cooling, a single carburetor, and a 5-speed gearbox.

Suzuki chose to stick with tried and tested designs with the model, including a tubular steel frame, heavy-duty traditional front forks, a monoshock rear, and single front and rear disc brakes. The kerb weight of the first generation DR650 is 170 kilograms and the engine produces approximately 46 hp at 6800 rpm, and 56.6 Nm at 5000 rpm.

The popularity of the Suzuki DR650 with motorcyclists around the world can probably be boiled down to two major factors – they’re relatively inexpensive to buy, and they’re almost impossible to break.

This popularity has led to the model remaining in production for almost 30 years, with the only thing likely to kill it off being its carburetor-fed engine, which can’t pass increasingly stringent emissions restrictions.

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Rear

The 1993 Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Bike Shown Here

This DR650 is a lot more special than most thanks to its Paris-Dakar Rally heritage, in fact the bike appears to be almost untouched since its last sojourn across the North African deserts in 1994.

The modern Dakar Rally takes place in South America due to the increasingly complex geopolitical safety concerns in North Africa, this has led to the original rallies of 1979 to 2007 being looked back on as a golden age, with many heroes made, and sadly many lives lost.

The 1994 Paris-Dakar Rally was unusual in that it departed Paris and made its way to Dakar, before turning around and returning to Paris, finishing at Euro Disney Resort (now Disneyland Paris). This would doubtless have meant a lot to French rider Gilles Francru as he crossed the finish line in 33rd place after watching countless fellow competitors fall by the wayside to injury, mechanical failure, or exhaustion. 96 motorcycles had started the rally, but just 47 crossed the finish line.

If you’d like to add a genuine Paris-Dakar bike to your own garage you’ll be able to bid on this one when it rolls across the auction block with RM Sotheby’s on the 5th of September in London as part of the Weird & Wonderful Collection.

If you’d like to read more about the bike or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Seat

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Seat 2

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Seat 1

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Road Book

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Front Wheel

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Fender

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Engine

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Dash

Suzuki DR650 Paris-Dakar Rally Bash Plate

Images: Dirk de Jager ©2018 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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Father & Son Project – The Lloyd Brothers Honda XL600R Street Tracker https://silodrome.com/honda-xl600r-street-tracker/ Mon, 27 Aug 2018 06:01:22 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=83087 Father & Son Project – The Lloyd Brothers Honda XL600R Street Tracker

Lloyd Brothers Motorsports have been building some of the quickest flat trackers in the world for over 25 years, but this project wasn’t built for dirt oval competition, it was built as a father son project by company co-founder (and Dad) David Lloyd, and his son James. The Beginning The project began with a 1987 Honda...

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Father & Son Project – The Lloyd Brothers Honda XL600R Street Tracker

Lloyd Brothers Motorsports have been building some of the quickest flat trackers in the world for over 25 years, but this project wasn’t built for dirt oval competition, it was built as a father son project by company co-founder (and Dad) David Lloyd, and his son James.

The Beginning

The project began with a 1987 Honda XL600R that had been bought brand new by David’s brother Bill Lloyd. Just 2,700 miles had been added to the bike over the intervening decades – so Bill gave it to David’s high school-aged son James as a gift.

With the Lloyd family being who they are, it was unlikely the bike was going to stay stock for very long. It was decided that a full teardown would begin, followed by a rebuild to turn Uncle Bill’s bike into the best Honda XL600R street tracker in the world.

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Building The Lloyd Brothers Honda XL600R Street Tracker

The plan was to get the bike built just in time for the start of James’ senior year of high school, and they only just made it with the help of some good friends, including Bryan Fuller and the Fuller Moto crew, Brian Heidt, Wes Hines and Derek Kines, as well as flat track team member, Rich Lambrects of Desmo Pro.

One of the great benefits of being a racing family is that there are always boxes of unused parts stacked in a shed or garage, and the Lloyd family certainly have their fair share of miscellaneous parts boxes.

Perhaps most importantly they had an unused front wheel and rotor, a front master cylinder, a rear wheel and rotor, and a swing arm from an Aprilia SXV 550 they used to race – all of these would find a home on the Honda replacing the stock parts.

The forks were replaced with much better performing upside-down forks from a Suzuki GSXR, and a Yamaha R6 monoshock was used in the rear, creating a chimera-like motorcycle that includes the best parts from multiple manufacturers.

Honda XL600R Street Tracker

A titanium M4 slip-on muffler replaced the stock unit, it was left over from a rule change applied by the sanctioning body that enforced more stringent sound limits on competitors – so on the Honda single it gives nice bark.

A new subframe was fabricated by Rich Lambrects, it was then fitted with a seat/tail piece supplied by Grand Prix Speed Works, its the same as the one used on the Woods Rotax bikes which is rather fitting, because David used to race them when he was 15.

Paint was done by Reuben Martinez, who also paints the Lloyd Brothers race bikes, the livery has an almost John Player Special feel to it, which will make it popular with any vintage Formula 1 fans.

The second most challenging aspect of the build was re-jetting the carburetors to suit the new air-filters and exhaust. The bike was rolled up onto a dyno but the jetting process was made difficult by the lack of suitable jet sizes – so they drilled a few spares and added leaner needles to get the fueling just right.

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The number one most challenging aspect was something you would probably never guess – it proved almost impossible to remove the red paint from the engine. David remembered the process:

“The most difficult part of the build was getting the red paint off of the engine. I don’t know what Honda used but it was on there! After doing what we could with paint stripper, we ended up building a makeshift soda blaster on a large tarp in our driveway and spent many hours blasting and then collecting the soda from the tarp and re-using it.

Doing this together brought me back to when someone taught me how to drill a hole properly or put all the bolts in loose before you tighten one of them…the basics of working on machines.”

The completed bike is now by far the best motorcycle that belongs to any attendee of James’ high school, and I say that confidently without knowing what anyone else there is riding.

The next civilian Lloyd Brothers build will be a father/daughter project that’s already under way, it’s a 1968 CB350 and we’ll be featuring it here when it’s ready for roll out.

You can follow Lloyd Brothers Motorsports on Facebook here.

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Honda XL600R Street Tracker 4

Honda XL600R Street Tracker 2

Honda XL600R Street Tracker 1

Images by Steve West

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The Post-Apocalyptic Droog Moto Kawasaki Ninja 650R – Moto 12 https://silodrome.com/custom-kawasaki-650r/ Mon, 13 Aug 2018 08:01:33 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82408 The Post-Apocalyptic Droog Moto Kawasaki Ninja 650R – Moto 12

The Kawasaki Ninja 650R isn’t a motorcycle that you’d necessarily think of as a post-apocalyptic machine, but the team at Droog Moto took a look under the fairing and realized they could make something of it – something a little less 9-to-5 and a little more get-out-alive. Droog Moto is a highly-regarded custom motorcycle garage...

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The Post-Apocalyptic Droog Moto Kawasaki Ninja 650R – Moto 12

The Kawasaki Ninja 650R isn’t a motorcycle that you’d necessarily think of as a post-apocalyptic machine, but the team at Droog Moto took a look under the fairing and realized they could make something of it – something a little less 9-to-5 and a little more get-out-alive.

Droog Moto is a highly-regarded custom motorcycle garage based out of Washington State, it’s run by an enterprising young couple named Max and Erica Droog who are known for their tough-as-nails, post-apocalyptic scrambler builds.

If you like what you see, this bike is currently for sale by Droog Moto here. The company also sells a range of parts, accessories, and apparel, if you’d like to take a look you can click here to visit the store. The write-up on this build below was penned by Max and Erica – we like to bring the story of a build in the words of the builder (or builders) when we can to give insight into their methods and thought process.

Custom Kawasaki 650R

The Droog Moto Kawasaki Ninja 650R

Words by Max and Erica Droog

We have been taking a more modern build approach in terms of donor bikes lately to really transform them into burly futuristic apocalypse (not zombies) machines. We wanted our next build to be something from a great donor bike and knew that the Kawasaki Ninja 650r with its torquey parallel twin motor is what we were after to turn into a rad Urban Brawler.

We picked up a 2013 Kawasaki Ninja 650R and began removing all the unneeded items and clutter. The first and most major item to be amputated was the solid chunk of steel Kawasaki called a subframe. It was roughly 3 feet long and welded onto the main frame.

Once this was removed, we began fabricating a lightweight floating style subframe to compliment the frame and tank lines. We hand made a new seat and had Ampersand Leather Co. in Seattle, WA upholster us a sleek and tight cover.

Custom Kawasaki 650R

We tucked and relocated all of the electronic items and fit a small lightweight AntiGravity battery into the build. This really exposed the offset shock and gave the bike a unique modern appeal. The rear lighting is integrated into the rear hoop giving the back end a clean and open look.

We then moved onto the fuel tank and gave it the Droog Moto Signature look and fabricated a louvre vent into the tank cover. Per usual, we equipped Moto 12 with a rugged and raw steel tracker plate which house four very bright LED pod lights featuring high and low options, LED turn signals along with an insert cut louvre to compliment the fuel tank. The tracker plate was paired up with a fork conversion to give the build a suspension improvement and more modern touch. The forks were setup with our Droog Moto 1 1/8” handlebars, Trailtech Endurance 2 speedometer and thick comfy wire tied grips!

The exhaust was re-worked with a stubby dual exit silencer and custom heat shield. The stock radiator was removed and upgraded with an aluminum one. To finish off the build, we hand made aluminum wheel inserts to pair up with the chunky Continental TKC80 tires.

Visit Droog Moto here

Custom Kawasaki 650R

Custom Kawasaki 650R

Custom Kawasaki 650R

Custom Kawasaki 650R

Custom Kawasaki 650R

Custom Kawasaki 650R

Custom Kawasaki 650R

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Datsun Racing Documentary: Against All Odds https://silodrome.com/datsun-racing-documentary-odds/ Sun, 12 Aug 2018 04:01:17 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82025 Datsun Racing Documentary: Against All Odds

Against All Odds is a 1971 Datsun documentary about the team’s Trans Am racing efforts with the Datsun 510, known as the Datsun 1600 in many world markets outside of North America. The mighty little Datsun 510 would shock the under 2.5 class in the 1971 and 1972 SCCA Trans Am Championship, beating the previous...

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Datsun Racing Documentary: Against All Odds

Against All Odds is a 1971 Datsun documentary about the team’s Trans Am racing efforts with the Datsun 510, known as the Datsun 1600 in many world markets outside of North America.

The mighty little Datsun 510 would shock the under 2.5 class in the 1971 and 1972 SCCA Trans Am Championship, beating the previous favorites BMW and Alfa Romeo.

The sporting credentials of the 510 would be further cemented with multiple wins in both rally and circuit racing around the world, helping to establish Datsun (and Nissan) as a genuine threat to the established American and European marques.

If you’d like to read more about the history of the Datsun 510 you can click here.

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Swany Grip Summer Motorcycle Gloves https://silodrome.com/ellaspede-summer-swany-grip-motorcycle-gloves/ Wed, 01 Aug 2018 04:00:09 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=81251 Swany Grip Summer Motorcycle Gloves

The Grip Motorcycle Gloves were designed by the Japanese team at Swany for summer use – when thick, non-ventilated gloves can quickly become soaked with sweat and barely useable. Each pair are made from durable but thin leather with ample perforations along the backs to allow maximum airflow. The seams are externally stitched to avoid...

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Swany Grip Summer Motorcycle Gloves

The Grip Motorcycle Gloves were designed by the Japanese team at Swany for summer use – when thick, non-ventilated gloves can quickly become soaked with sweat and barely useable.

Each pair are made from durable but thin leather with ample perforations along the backs to allow maximum airflow. The seams are externally stitched to avoid chaffing on fingers and there’s an additional strip of leather across each palm to provide additional abrasion resistance.

The wrist closure is a thick velcro strap, with an elasticated inner wrist to keep them firmly fitted. The gloves can be ordered in either medium or large, and you can choose between black or mustard colorways.

Buy Here

Swany Grip Motorcycle Gloves Collage

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The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG – A Superlative JDM Unicorn https://silodrome.com/nissan-fairlady-240zg/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 06:01:45 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78505 The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG – A Superlative JDM Unicorn

The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG was was released in Japan in October 1971 for one reason and one reason alone – to homologate the 240Z for Group 4 racing. A series of changes were made to the 240ZG with the race track in mind, including an extended fiberglass “aero-dyna” nose for improved top...

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The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG – A Superlative JDM Unicorn

The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG

The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG was was released in Japan in October 1971 for one reason and one reason alone – to homologate the 240Z for Group 4 racing.

A series of changes were made to the 240ZG with the race track in mind, including an extended fiberglass “aero-dyna” nose for improved top speed and aerodynamics, riveted fender flares to allow the running of wider wheels and tires, a rear spoiler to reduce lift at higher speeds, aerodynamic headlight covers, and fender-mounted rear-view mirrors.

Nissan only offered the car in three colors to simplify the production process – Grande Prix Red, Grande Prix White, and Grande Prix Maroon. The “G” in “240ZG” stands for “Grande”, an indication perhaps of the grand tourer role the company hoped the model would fill.

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG

A number of features on the Nissan Fairlady 240ZG would become synonymous with the JDM scene, including the fender flares, headlight covers, and blacked-out RS Watanabe magnesium wheels. Although the 240ZG wasn’t the first to introduce any of these items, it did go a long way towards popularizing them in Japan.

The Nissan Fairlady 240ZG was never offered for sale outside Japan, though the aerodynamic nose kit was offered as a dealer option on the 240Z, this allowed it to be homologated for use in SCCA racing in the USA.

It was in 1972 that the 240ZG established its place in history, by winning the 1972 Fuji Grand Champion Series. The Datsun 240Z, Fairlady Z432, and 240ZG would go on to win a slew of races, furthering the work the Datsun 510 (also known as the Datsun 1600) had done establishing the marque as a builder of serious race cars.

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Side

The 1972 Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Shown Here

The car you see here is an all-original example that’s well-known among Japanese car collectors, it was originally delivered to a customer in the Shinagawa ward of Tokyo. In more recent years it’s had a thorough refurbishment including a respray in its original color – Grande Prix Maroon.

The interior of the car retains its original black vinyl upholstery, with a Datsun racing steering wheel in pride of place, and there’s a period-correct Nissan AM radio fitted. The fender rear vision mirrors, fender flares, rear spoiler, fiberglass “aero-dyna” nose, and headlight covers are all factory-correct.

The L24 inline-6 cylinder under the hood has a cast iron block and an alloy head, it’s a single overhead cam engine with two-valves per cylinder, a seven-bearing crankshaft, and a 9.0:1 compression ratio. The engine is fed by twin-SU-type carburetors and produces 151 hp at 5600 rpm with 146 ft-lbs of torque at 4400 rpm.

Both front and rear suspension is independent, with MacPherson struts, lower transverse and drag links, coil springs, telescopic dampers, and an anti-roll bar up front and Chapman struts, lower wishbones, coil springs, and telescopic dampers in the rear.

A factory-stock 240Z can do the 0-60 mph dash in 8.0 seconds, the top speed is 125 mph, and the fuel economy is ~21 mpg US (combined).

If you’d like to read more about this car or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing on RM Sotheby’s. It’s due to be auctioned at the Monterey Auction which will be held on the 24th and 25th of August.

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Wheels

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Back

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Detail

Nissan Fairlady 240Z Interior

Nissan Fairlady 240Z Engine Bay

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Wheel

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Fender

Nissan Fairlady 240Z Engine

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Front

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Rear

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Main

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Interior

Nissan Fairlady 240ZG Back

Images: Erik Fuller ©2018 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version https://silodrome.com/remote-control-datsun-240z/ Mon, 11 Jun 2018 04:01:35 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78041 Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version

This Tamiya 4×4 1:10 scale R/C car is based on the race-winning Datsun 240Z rally car used in the 1971 East African Safari Rally. The East African Safari Rally The East African Safari Rally was one of the most brutal, grueling motorsport events in the world. The race was founded in 1953 as the East...

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Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version

This Tamiya 4×4 1:10 scale R/C car is based on the race-winning Datsun 240Z rally car used in the 1971 East African Safari Rally.

The East African Safari Rally

The East African Safari Rally was one of the most brutal, grueling motorsport events in the world. The race was founded in 1953 as the East African Coronation Safari by two friends – Eric Cecil and his cousin Neil Vincent.

The two men wanted to race, but not at a circuit, as Vincent put it: “I can imagine nothing more boring than driving round and round the same piece of track, but if you will organise an event where we get into our cars, slam the door, go halfway across Africa and back and the first car home is a winner, I’ll be in it.”

The early rally route started in Nairobi, then went around Lake Victoria, through Uganda and Tanganyika and returned back into Kenya. The race was 3,852 miles long, and it ran over open land and dirt roads, with altitude changes from sea level to 10,000 ft, and temperature changes from 40+C to below freezing.

The 1971 running of the event saw 107 cars enter with purpose-built, Africa-proof rally cars, but just 32 crossed the finish line. Many have pointed to the East African Safari Rally as the godfather of the Paris-Dakar, and there’s no denying that it was one of the toughest single events in motorsport history.

In the 1971 race, the #11 Datsun 240Z of Edgar Herrmann and Hans Schuller took the overall victory, the class victory, the team victory, and the manufacturers championship – making Datsun the fist company to win all three categories two years running.

Tamiya 1:10 Scale Remote Control Datsun 240Z Rally Version Car

The Tamiya 1:10 Scale R/C Datsun 240Z Rally Version

The R/C car you see here is based on the Tamiya DF-03 chassis, it’s a 4×4 platform with double wishbone suspension front and rear (including adjustable upper arms and multiple attachment positions for dampers). It has a longitudinally positioned battery with the R/C unit on the rear, and ball differentials are installed in compact front and rear sealed gearboxes to prevent the incursion of dirt and debris.

Tamiya have fitted the Datsun with correct Rally Block Tires that are well-suited to off-road use, and the polycarbonate body comes with all the correct sponsor logos and car numbers used on the original 1971 rally car.

The original hood-mounted light pods are also included in the kit, as well as metal-plated front and rear bumpers, and paint to match the original.

The Tamiya Datsun 240Z has a length of 451mm, a width of 190mm, and a height of 138mm. The wheelbase is 251mm and the tires are 27x69mm. The chassis is a monocoque-tub which offers both low weight and excellent rigidity, when combined with the polycarbonate body, all-wheel drive, and the powerful RS540 electric motor, the car is a highly competitive R/C racer both on and off the asphalt.

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Tamiya 4x4 Chassis

Shekhar Mehta:Lofty Drews Datsun 240Z 1973 East African Safari Rally winner

The Datsun 240Z shown above is the car driven by Shekhar Mehta and Lofty Drews in the 1973 East African Safari Rally, this is the condition it was in when it crossed the finish line. The damage it sustained shows very clearly why most entrants never completed the event.

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The Toyota 2000GT Roadster From James Bond’s You Only Live Twice https://silodrome.com/toyota-2000gt-roadster/ Fri, 08 Jun 2018 05:01:03 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77952 The Toyota 2000GT Roadster From James Bond’s You Only Live Twice

The Toyota 2000GT The Toyota 2000GT was actually built by Yamaha, and it was originally intended to have Nissan badges. It’s a Japanese sports car not widely known outside the classic car world, but its fame has been increasing in recent years in lock-step with its value, now making the Toyota 2000GT the most expensive...

The post The Toyota 2000GT Roadster From James Bond’s You Only Live Twice appeared first on Silodrome.

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The Toyota 2000GT Roadster From James Bond’s You Only Live Twice

The Toyota 2000GT

The Toyota 2000GT was actually built by Yamaha, and it was originally intended to have Nissan badges. It’s a Japanese sports car not widely known outside the classic car world, but its fame has been increasing in recent years in lock-step with its value, now making the Toyota 2000GT the most expensive and collectible Japanese car of all time.

How expensive you ask? The highest hammer price at auction was $1.2 million USD. Just a little more than your mother’s Corolla.

The James Bond Connection

If all that wasn’t enough to pique your interest, the 2000GT is also a Bond car. Toyota built two special roofless roadster versions of the model for the 1967 James Bond movie You Only Live Twice, rumour has it that at 6’2″ Sean Connery couldn’t fit in the hardtop version, and a targa top version looked ridiculous because his head stuck so far above the windscreen and rear roof line.

No convertible top was made for the two specials, but tonneau covers were fitted behind the seats to give the appearance of a folding top. The car you see here is one of these two exceptionally rare roadsters, and although records from filming no longer exist, it’s highly likely that both cars got some screen time being driven by Akiko Wakabayashi.

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Front

Design and Development of the Toyota 2000GT

The design work for the 2000GT was largely done by Yamaha in the mid-1960s, the plan being to develop a sports car and sell the concept to Nissan with whom Yamaha had a healthy working relationship. Much of the design work was done by German-American designer Albrecht Goertz (a protégé of Raymond Loewy), who was tasked with creating a Japanese answer to two of the most desirable sports cars in the world at the time – the Jaguar E-Type and the Porsche 911.

Nissan decided to turn down the project, though they would release their own rather similar looking sports car a few years later – the Datsun 240Z. After the rejection from Nissan, Yamaha pursued other Japanese automakers, before Toyota agreed to buy the rights.

Toyota were known for their somewhat staid and bland commuter cars, so they saw this turn-key sports car project as a way to enliven their reputation both in Japan and abroad. Toyota designer Satoru Nozaki created the final form of the 2000GT that would go to production, though it kept the underpinnings from Yamaha, and maintained the lightweight aluminium body construction.

Yamaha engineers took the inline-6 cylinder engine from the Toyota Crown sedan and developed a new twin cam head for it with overhead spark plugs, three two-barrel Solex 40 PHH carburettors, and twin three-into-one exhaust manifolds. This advanced engine is capable of 150 bhp, a top speed of 135 mph, and depending on final drive ratio it could manage fuel economy in the 31 mpg range.

Power is sent back to the rear wheels through a 5-speed gearbox and a limited slip differential, and unusually for the time the 2000GT was fitted with power-assisted disc brakes on all four corners – a first for a Japanese automaker.

Toyota 2000GT Convertible Engine 2

MSRP and Sales Figures

Due to the amount of low volume parts and careful hand assembly required for the car, it proved very expensive to build. Toyota is rumoured to have lost money on each one it sold, despite the relatively high MSRP at $6,800 USD. By way of comparison, brand new Jaguar E-Type (XKE) could be had for $5,580, and you could take home a new Porsche 911 for $6,490.

Unsurprisingly, not many of them sold. Just 351 were taken home by buyers worldwide, with approximately 60 sold in the USA. Funnily enough and despite Toyota’s reputation at the time for building cheap, reliable rust buckets, the Toyota 2000GT made the best financial investment by far when compared to the E-Type and 911.

Carroll Shelby and the Toyota 2000GT’s Racing Heritage

More than one person thought the 2000GT would make an excellent race car. A modified example came 3rd at the 1966 Japanese Grand Prix and another won the gruelling Fuji 1000 Kilometres race in 1967.

On the other side of the Pacific Carroll Shelby picked up three 2000GTs and prepared them for competition in the 1968 SCCA production car races competing in the CP category. Two of the cars raced and one remained as a spare, the cars performed well and proved highly reliable. At the end of the season two of the cars were sold in the USA and one was taken back to Japan by Toyota.

The 1967 Toyota 2000GT Roadster Shown Here

The car you see here is one of the most collectible 2000GTs in existence, just two roadsters were ever made, both for the 007 film You Only Live Twice. It’s hard to know exactly what it would fetch on the open market – but it’s a moot point as it’s not for sale and it’s unlikely that its current owner will part with it any time soon.

If you’d like to see more of this car you can actually visit in person, it’s part of the Roots of Monozukuri exhibit at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. If you’d like to see more or book tickets, you can click here to visit the website.

Toyota 2000GT

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Rear Side

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Left Side

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Interior 3

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Interior 2

Spoked Car Wheel

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Rear Wheel

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Front Wheel

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Shifter

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Interior

Toyota 2000GT Convertible Dashboard

Toyota 2000GT Convertible Tailight

Toyota 2000GT Engine

Toyota 2000GT Convertible Trunk

Toyota 2000GT Roadster Overhead

Images courtesy of The Petersen Automotive Museum

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