Engineering – Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Tue, 18 Sep 2018 09:20:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 MV Agusta Three-Cylinder 500cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle https://silodrome.com/mv-agusta-three-cylinder/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 08:01:29 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=83621 MV Agusta Three-Cylinder 500cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle

The MV Agusta three-cylinder, known as the Tre Cilindri, was ridden by Giacomo Agostini to 13 of his 15 World Championship titles between 1966 and 1973. MV Agusta had started with a 350cc version of the three-cylinder in 1965, this engine would be expanded to 500cc for 1966, allowing the Italian company to challenge both the 350cc...

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MV Agusta Three-Cylinder 500cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle

The MV Agusta three-cylinder, known as the Tre Cilindri, was ridden by Giacomo Agostini to 13 of his 15 World Championship titles between 1966 and 1973.

MV Agusta had started with a 350cc version of the three-cylinder in 1965, this engine would be expanded to 500cc for 1966, allowing the Italian company to challenge both the 350cc and 500cc classes with what was almost the same motorcycle.

The MV Agusta Three-Cylinder

The original plan to build a three-cylinder had been put forward by Count Domenico Agusta, though not an engineer he was an enthusiastic amateur, and he realized they could build a 350 triple using their 250 twin as a starting point.

Though a complete and functioning engine was built, it proved incapable of the performance needed to take on the best in the world. MV Agusta’s Chief Technical Designer Mario Rossi and his Technical Draftsman Enrico Sironi and seen the inherent issues with the original three-cylinder ahead of time and had begun to develop their own design.

This alternative engine would prove to be the most successful in MV Agusta history, and it would show once and for all that it was possible to trounce the might of the Japanese motorcycle manufacturers, you just needed the right team of engineers, with enough funding to do their jobs.

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder Main

The exquisitely engineered MV Agusta Three was an inline engine with twin overhead cams, a large cooling oil sump was added that runs longitudinally between the frame rails, a pressed-together crankshaft, and there was extensive use of either needle or ball bearings throughout.

The double overheads cams are driven by gears that run up the right side of the engine, each lobe directly operates a valve, with four per cylinder and a compression ratio of 11:1 on the 500cc version of the engine, with a bore/stroke of 62mm/55mm.

When tuned in full race mode these 500cc engines are capable of 84 hp at 13,500 rpm or 168 hp/litre, remarkable figures even before you learn that the dry weight of the complete motorcycle was just 118 kgs (260 lbs). Top speed is a little contentious and it’s not easy to narrow down an accurate figure, however 161 to 163 mph seems to be the general consensus.

The one thing the engineering stats don’t give you is a sense of just how the engine actually sounds, so I’ve included a clip of Agostini himself starting and warming up a Tre Cilindri, I’m sure you’ll agree it’s the best thing you’ve ever heard with the exception of Queen Live at Wembley.

The 1973 MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder Shown Here

The motorcycle you see here represents the final version or iteration of the iconic 500cc Tre Cilindri, with the improved “Testalarga” cylinder head with steeper inlet ports and repositioned camshafts.

Though MV Agusta didn’t keep accurate records about which specific motorcycles raced in which events, it’s likely that this motorcycle was used earlier on in the 1973 season before the new four-cylinder rose to prominence.

In later years Count Agusta personally donated this motorcycle as well as a 1971 500 Triple and a six-cylinder factory prototype, to former MV race mechanic Lucio Castelli. Castelli paraded and displayed the motorcycles throughout Europe for years before selling them on to collector Roberto Anelli who displayed and paraded the bike at the Isle of Man TT, Spa Francorchamps, Assen, ASI Motor Show, Jarama, and the Goodwood Revival.

Documented riders at these events have included World Champions Giacomo Agostini and Angel Nieto.

The bike is now due to cross the auction block with Bonhams on the 23rd of September with an estimated value of between £120,000 and £160,000. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder

MV Agusta Three-Cylinder Engine Engine 3

MV Agusta Three-Cylinder Engine Tachometer

MV Agusta Logo

MV Agusta Three-Cylinder Engine Exhaust

MV Agusta Three-Cylinder Engine Engine 2

MV Agusta Three-Cylinder Engine Carburetor

MV Agusta Three-Cylinder Engine Sprocket

MV Agusta Three-Cylinder Engine

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder 5

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder 4

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder 3

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder 2

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder Naked

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder Rear Wheel

MV Agusta 500cc Three-Cylinder 1

Images courtesy of Bonhams

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A Brief History of the Ariel Square Four https://silodrome.com/history-ariel-square-four/ Mon, 10 Sep 2018 07:00:56 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=83159 A Brief History of the Ariel Square Four

The Ariel Square Four is one of the most famous names among Britain's original "big" bikes, standing side-by-side with the likes of Brough Superior and Vincent HRD.

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A Brief History of the Ariel Square Four

Introduction

The Ariel Square Four is one of the most famous names among Britain’s original “big” bikes, standing side-by-side with the likes of Brough Superior and Vincent HRD. The Square Four is a motorcycle that was born of a surprisingly simple idea, a motorcycle not made for racing or raw performance, although it was capable of that, but a motorcycle made for comfortable long range cruising with or without a sidecar.

Edward Turner and the Birth of the Ariel Square Four

Engineer Edward Turner was a man who had a great influence on Britain’s motorcycle and car making industry. He first rode a motorcycle at the age of fourteen and when we look at the career path he would later follow he must have been bitten hard by the motorcycle bug because it became his life’s work.

Ariel Square Four Engine Cutaway

In 1925, ten years after that fateful ride on a New Imperial Light Tourist motorbike, Edward Turner had a design for an overhead camshaft single cylinder motorcycle engine published by “The Motor Cycle”. Two years later in 1927 he had built his first motorcycle, the “Turner Special”, powered by a newly designed OHC 350cc single cylinder engine and fitted with a Sturmey-Archer three speed gearbox.

The best was yet to come however and by this time, legend would have it, that Edward Turner had taken up smoking and one day he had something of a “Eureka” moment. He was a fan of the parallel twin motorcycle engine and later in his career his parallel twins would power such iconic motorcycles as the Triumph Thunderbird, ridden by Marlon Brando in the movie “The Wild One”, and the Triumph Bonneville.

But over a smoke or two back before those motorcycles were thought of, Edward Turner thought of putting two parallel twins together to make a square four cylinder engine. He used his cigarette pack to make his concept drawing whilst sitting in a cafe, presumably over a nice hot cup of tea and the last smoke out of the pack.

Ariel Square Four motorcycle

One might wonder why an engineer would consider the complexity of making an engine twice as complicated by joining two engines together but there was indeed a method to the madness. By joining two parallel twin engines together there would be two crankshafts, turning in opposite directions to cancel out each other’s gyroscopic effect. Additionally the engine could be set up so that diagonally opposite pistons would be in top dead center, and bottom dead center thus counter balancing each other’s movement. The result was intended to be an engine that was perfectly balanced and thus smooth.

Edward Turner got busy over a drawing board with a T-square and set about proper drawings and a detailed design for this new engine which he completed in 1928. He was a fan of overhead camshafts and so he gave his new square four an overhead camshaft driven by a chain from the gear on a shaft driven by the two crankshafts.

At the time he designed the Square Four engine Edward Turner was managing Chepstow Motors in Peckham Road, London, which was an agency for Velocette Motorcycles. Turner decided to try his luck approaching the major motorcycle makers to see if any would be interested in his engine design. At BSA he was refused, but Ariel were interested with the result that in 1929 he was invited to join the Ariel staff as an engineer working alongside Bert Hopwood and under the direction of Val Page.

The Ariel Square Four 4F, 4G and 4H

Turner’s square four design was very compact, so much so that it was able to be fitted into an existing Ariel 250cc Colt frame designed for a single cylinder engine. In his original design the Square Four engine was made in unit with a three speed gearbox which was driven from the rearmost crankshaft, keeping the whole assembly very compact.

This ensured that it was a relatively easy process to go from new engine to complete prototype motorcycle. This prototype was not to make it into production however. The unitary construction was deemed too expensive and economies were also made in the engine’s cooling fins. The reduction in engine cooling fins in particular would turn out to be a bad move indeed. The cylinders were cast en-bloc and the cylinder head was also a one piece unit.

Ariel Model 4F.31 Square Four motorcycle

The new 498cc Ariel Square Four 4F motorcycle was shown to the public at the Olympia Motorcycle Show in 1930. The show bike had a separate Burman four speed gearbox with hand change gear lever (this would later be changed to foot control during production), and the engine was fitted into a modified Ariel SF31 499cc Sloper rigid frame.

The bike used the same fuel tank and other components of the 499cc Sloper model, the main difference being the engine. No doubt the thinking was that they were both 500cc bikes so it was most economical to use shared components as much as possible. The Great Depression was underway and so economy was all important.

Ariel SF31 Sloper motorcycle

In 1931 the Ariel Square Four was entered in the Maudes Trophy and won the event. This is particularly impressive when you look at the list of challenges the Ariel 4F Square Four successfully completed and the margins within which it did so :

  • Seven-hour endurance run at Brooklands: 368 miles covered.
  • Consumption test: approx. 700 miles on seven shillings worth of petrol and oil.
  • Head decarbonised in 4 min 19 sec using only spanners from the motorcycle’s tool kit (target time: under 7 min).
  • One-hour speed run at Brooklands: more than 80 miles covered. (target distance: 70 miles).
  • Run for 70 minutes in each of four gears on ordinary roads.
  • Seven non-stop ascents and descents of each of seven famous test hills: Porlock, Lynton, Beggar’s Roost, Countisbury, Bwlch y Groes, Dinas Hill, and Alt y Bady.
  • 700 miles in less than 670 minutes (target time: 700 minutes).

Ariel Square Four 4F OHC motorcycle

Another quite fun marketing stunt was the “Ariel Sevens” test. This involved getting seven schoolboys to kick start the Ariel Square Four seven times each. This resulted in the engine starting on the first kick 48 out of 49 attempts.

Perhaps the “piece de resistance” for the Ariel 4F Square four was accomplished in 1933 when Ben Bickell took his supercharged modified Ariel Square Four to Brooklands, put down a lap speed of 110 mph, and only just missed out on becoming the first British 500cc motorcycle to achieve one hundred miles in one hour (the top image is of this supercharged motorcycle).

Ariel Square Four Mark II

The OHC engine was nicknamed the “Cammy” engine and it acquired for itself a bit of a reputation for overheating at the rear of the cylinder head which could result in deformation.

Nonetheless the engine and bike performed pretty well and even achieved a win in the London to Land’s End Trial. Power was thought to be a bit lacking for sidecar use however so in 1932 the engine was revised with an increase of 5 mm in bore size to bring the capacity up to 601cc. Both 498cc and 601cc versions were sold up until 1933 when the “500cc” was phased out.

The Ariel Square Four 4F was a motorcycle that produced the quiet and smooth power it was intended to back in Edward Turner’s first vision of the engine back in the cafe over a cup of tea and his last smoke. There was however room for improvement and those developments were in the pipeline.

In 1936 Edward Turner became General Manager and Chief Designer of Ariel and one of the decisions he made was to fully address the overheating problem that was evident in the original 4F model. He entrusted this work primarily to Val Page who had established a great reputation having been the designer of the J.A. Prestwich V-twin engine of the Brough Superior SS100. Val Page made the significant changes to the Square Four engine needed to improve it, enlarge it, and solve the rear cylinder head overheating issue.

Ariel Square Four engine 4G

Val Page changed the Square Four engine by providing a cooling air channel between the front cylinders and adding fins to the cylinder head to better dissipate heat and improve air flow. He also moved away from Edward Turner’s chain driven overhead camshaft to an overhead valve system, with the valves being operated by a single camshaft located between the crankshafts with pushrods and overhead rockers.

The Square Four was a touring motorcycle engine that needed to be smooth, reliable, and easy to maintain: it did not need to be a high revving racing bike engine. Val Page’s changes were all about making the engine “boringly reliable” and he achieved this well. No doubt it was an engine that George Brough would admire, it was certainly an engine that Phil Vincent appreciated.

Ariel Square Four 4G motorcycle

For 1937 both the 600cc (i.e. 601cc) 4F and the new 1000cc (i.e. 998cc) 4G models were made to the revised Val Page OHV design. Both models were made with girder forks and a rigid frame. In 1938 Ariel dropped the 600cc 4F and listed two versions of the 1000cc bike, a “De Luxe” model 4G, and a “Standard” model 4H. This changed again in 1939, as the Second World War loomed over Britain, with the return of the 600cc 4F in addition to the 4G and 4H.

The De Luxe 4G and the Standard 4F seem to have had minimal differences in Ariel promotional literature of the time. The De Luxe 4G featured valenced fenders and a side-stand (aka “prop stand”) while the Standard 4H was listed as having standard fenders and no prop stand. Also for 1939 Ariel offered their patented Anstey-link plunger rear suspension as an additional cost option.

Ariel 4G Square Four motorcycle

Despite the hope offered by the Munich Agreement of September 30th,1938 and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s “Peace in our time” speech, Ariel Motors Ltd. was about to be engulfed in the Second World War which would begin with the Nazi invasion of Poland just under a year later on September 1st, 1939.

So, instead of battling for motorcycle sales, Ariel Motors would be playing its part in the battle for Britain’s survival. Ariel’s contribution to the war effort was the manufacture of simple, tough and reliable single cylinder military motorcycles, and manufacture of the Square Four was suspended until the war’s end in 1945.

Ariel 4G Square Four motorcycle

With the war over in 1945 Ariel Motors quickly resumed civilian motorcycle production including putting the pre-war 1939 4G De Luxe 1000cc version of the Square Four back into production. This model was improved the following year in 1946 with rear suspension becoming standard and the changeover to telescopic front forks. This model would remain in production until 1949.

Ariel Square Four motorcycle

The Ariel Square Four Mark I

The Ariel Square Four Mark I made its debut in 1949 and, at long last, saw the cast iron cylinder barrels and head changed over to aluminum alloy. The change to aluminum alloy shed 30lb from the weight of the bike but, even more importantly, brought much improved cooling because of the aluminum’s far better heat dissipating characteristics. The electrical system was changed from the old Lucas Magdyno to a car type coil ignition with distributor and a 70 watt dynamo/generator.

Ariel Mark II Square 4 motorcycle

In 1950 the speedometer was relocated from the fuel tank top to the front forks top and then in 1951 the tank top instrument panel was omitted and the speedometer housed in the alloy casting that formed the fork crown. The Mark I weighed 435lb dry, its engine produced 35 bhp @5,500 rpm, and it was capable of over 90 mph.

The Ariel Square Four Mark II

Even with the change to aluminum for the barrels and head there were still concerns regarding the Square Four’s heat dissipating characteristics. This is an issue for air cooled engines and Harley-Davidson had to face a similar set of problems with their V-twin engines. A square four engine however requires a more strategic approach to cooling for the rear cylinders because they are receiving a different air flow than the front cylinders.

The cylinders at the front are directly in the air flow, while the cylinders at the rear tend to get an air flow already heated by passage by the front cylinders. Ariel made significant changes to this engine to once and for all resolve the uneven cooling issues. For the 1953 Mark II model the cylinder barrels were all separated and the cylinder head was completely re-designed. The exhaust for each cylinder was separated and fitted to the cylinder head by left and right exhaust manifolds each accommodating two exhaust pipes. Similarly the inlet manifold and rocker cover were combined and the carburetor used was a classic British SU, which sat up a bit taller than the previous arrangement and so required a frame modification.

In 1953 both the Mark I and new Mark II models were sold side by side in dealerships and by 1954 only the Mark II was on sale. The single solo seat was replaced with a double seat. 1954 saw the addition of a fork lock, and then in 1956 the headlight was given a hooded cover integrated with the fork cover and instrument panel. The fork top instrument panel included speedometer, ammeter, and light switch etc. The front hub was also updated to a lightweight alloy unit.

Ariel Square Four Mark II

This new version of the Square Four engine proved to be the cream of the crop and produced 40 hp. The bike weight was a bit less at 435 lb dry and it was capable of “the ton” (100 mph).

The Mark II remained in production until 1959. However, even after it had been withdrawn from manufacture there were people who lamented its passing and wanted to see it come back.

The Healey 1000/4

Two brothers, George and Tim Healey, were Ariel Square Four aficionados who decided to try to put a new version of the bike into  limited production. Not having the ability to manufacture the parts for the bikes themselves George and Tim set about buying all the Ariel Square Four parts they could so they could build a few special bikes.

The Healey brothers had already built up a great deal of experience modifying Ariel Square Four bikes having been setting up custom competition bikes for racing and sprint (i.e. drag strip) use. They had also built supercharged sprint bikes which had doubled the standard engine’s power.

Healey 1000/4 /Ariel Square Four custom motorcycle

George and Tim wanted to create the ultimate Square Four motorcycle so they approached a man named Roger Slater who had purchased the rights to manufacture the Fritz Egli tubular spine frame with a view to building their new bike on a custom Egli frame. The Egli frame was the lightest and stiffest design available at that time (1971). Looking for the best components the front forks were sourced from Metal Profiles while the drum brake assemblies were imported from Italy.

The new bike weighed 80 lbs less than the last model Ariel Square Four Mark II, so the weight was around 345 lb dry, with the engine tuned to produce 20% more power giving it 50 hp @ 6,000 rpm. The original Square Four engine used a dry sump and the new Healey kept to this and used the central tube of the Egli frame as the oil reservoir.

An oil cooler, better oil pump and larger oil filter completed the main list of improvements. The end result was a true British superbike, but with a smooth and beautifully balanced engine. Interestingly the light and lively Healey 1000/4 proved to be a modern take on Edward Turner’s original concept of the bike back in 1930, a light, powerful and excellent handling motorcycle: a 1930 concept but with 1970’s technology.

Healey 1000/4 /Ariel Square Four custom motorcycle

The Healey 1000/4 was a limited production bike with just twenty eight being made before the brothers decided they’d run out of parts and they went on to other projects. Tim Healey went on to work with Laverda. Production ceased in 1977.

The Healey 1000/4 gives us a glimpse of what the Ariel Square Four could have become had production kept going past 1959.

Conclusion

The Ariel Square Four has been affectionately nicknamed the “Squariel” and it was a classic among classics. It produced a smooth and beautiful exhaust note, not at all like the thump of a V-twin or a parallel twin. It was a motorcycle for all day cruising and it was perfectly adapted for sidecar use.

Its designer, Edward Turner would go on to create some of the most iconic motorcycles ever to be made in England’s green and pleasant land, and he also created the 2.5 liter and 4.5 liter Daimler/Jaguar V8 engines. But it is his first and most unique design, the Square Four, that he is perhaps most remembered for.

Photo Credits: Bonhams, Ariel, Ariel North America.

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MV Agusta 861 Magni – Italian Motorcycle Royalty https://silodrome.com/mv-agusta-861-magni/ Thu, 06 Sep 2018 08:01:20 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=83482 MV Agusta 861 Magni – Italian Motorcycle Royalty

This MV Agusta 861 Magni is the work of Arturo Magni and his sons, Arturo was a legendary Italian engineer who joined MV Agusta in the early 1950s after a stint with Gilera. Any student of motorcycle racing history will immediately recognize the importance of seeing the Magni name on the side of an MV...

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MV Agusta 861 Magni – Italian Motorcycle Royalty

This MV Agusta 861 Magni is the work of Arturo Magni and his sons, Arturo was a legendary Italian engineer who joined MV Agusta in the early 1950s after a stint with Gilera. Any student of motorcycle racing history will immediately recognize the importance of seeing the Magni name on the side of an MV Agusta – these motorcycles are unadulterated two-wheeled Italian royalty.

Arturo Magni

With Arturo heading the R&D, engineering, and race team, MV Agusta would utterly dominate motorcycle racing up and down the classes, taking 270 Grand Prix victories and 75 World Championships between the beginning of his tenure in the early ’50s to the time the racing department at MV Agusta shutdown in 1976.

After MV Agusta’s step back from racing, Arturo and his two sons Carlo and Giovanni set up their own bespoke motorcycle company named EPM, later known more simply as Magni. Initially the company would work only with MV Agusta motorcycles for obvious reasons, but over the years they branched out and built high-performance Hondas, BMWs, and Moto Guzzis.

MV Agusta 861 Magni Left Side

The MV Agusta 861 Magni

One could argue that the MV Agusta 861 Magni, often just referred to as the 861 Magni, is the ultimate example of a Magni bike, with the obvious exception of the track-only race bikes of the 1950s and ’60s.

These bikes often started with a stock MV Agusta 750S, which was then disassembled before being rebuilt with a new Magni frame that had been designed with the benefit of the Magni family’s long racing heritage.

The inline-four cylinder engine was rebuilt with new high-compression pistons, swept capacity was increased from 750cc to 861cc and fitted with a pair of street cams, four Dellorto carburetors were bolted on as well as a chain-drive conversion, front and rear suspension was replaced with higher performance units, the original exhaust was swapped out for Conti pipes, and a new fairing, fuel tank, and seat were fitted too.

Not all of Magni MV Agustas received all of these upgrades, and the exact specification list changed over the years, as enthusiasts were sending in their 750 MV Agustas to Magni for 20-plus years.

MV Agusta 861 Magni Front Side

The 1978 MV Agusta 861 Magni Shown Here

The Magni you see here is once of the nicest examples of this rare motorcycle we’ve seen come up for public sale in some time.

This was one of the earlier Magni-modified MV Agustas, likely recieving its rebuild back in 1977, the same year that Magni first went into business as EPM. The front and rear drum brakes and earlier-style bodywork are immediate cause as to its vintage, as later Magni MV Agustas generally received disc brakes and differently styled fairings, seats, and fuel tanks.

It was first road-registered in Germany on the 21st of January 1978 and it’s now accompanied by German registration papers and a TüV (dated 4th July 2012).

Bonhams are estimating a hammer price of between £60,000 and £80,000 which represents a handsome appreciation in value for those who picked one up decades ago when they could be had for notably less money. That said, any red-blooded motorcyclist who’s heard one of these bikes being ridden in anger would happily sell their house to own one.

If you’d like to read more about this bike or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing on Bonhams.

MV Agusta 861 Magni Rear

MV Agusta 861 Magni name

MV Agusta 861 Magni Head

MV Agusta 861 Magni Front

MV Agusta 861 Magni Front Right

MV Agusta 861 Magni Front Drum Brake

MV Agusta 861 Magni Front 1

MV Agusta 861 Magni Engine

MV Agusta 861 Magni Engine 1

MV Agusta 861 Magni

Images courtesy of Bonhams

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The Turbo Maximus – A 200 hp Turbocharged Yamaha by Derek Kimes https://silodrome.com/turbo-maximus/ Thu, 30 Aug 2018 07:01:02 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82877 The Turbo Maximus – A 200 hp Turbocharged Yamaha by Derek Kimes

This article was written by the builder of Turbo Maximus – Derek Kimes. When possible we like to bring you the story of a build in the words of the person who built it to cut out the middle man and give you insight into the methods and thought process. My Background After serving 8...

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The Turbo Maximus – A 200 hp Turbocharged Yamaha by Derek Kimes

This article was written by the builder of Turbo Maximus – Derek Kimes. When possible we like to bring you the story of a build in the words of the person who built it to cut out the middle man and give you insight into the methods and thought process.

My Background

After serving 8 years in the US Navy, I decided to move on to other challenges. I left the beaches of San Diego and moved to Atlanta to pursue a degree in engineering. While Studying to be an engineer, I started working on my bike to learn hands-on skills. To say the least, it has been a steep learning curve. Back in August of 2014, I had learned that Brian Fuller’s shop was located in Atlanta. My savings were drying up and I needed a part-time job. I thought to myself, why not go do something great! I knew it would be a “Hail Mary,” but you never know unless you try. I sent an email to Bryan and told him about myself, what I’ve done, my plans, and about my bike.

To my surprise, He responded!

I met with Brian a few days later and I started working part-time at the shop sweeping floors, taking out the trash and doing the necessary small tasks to help assist the guys at the shop. As I look back, I am so grateful that Bryan gave a guy with no real fabrication or welding background, but a hard work ethic and drive, a chance to prove himself at his shop. Without that chance, this bike would never have happened. As time went on and I learned more, I would stay after hours in the shop working on my skills. I spent a lot of nights and weekends at the shop – too many to count.

Bryan has been very generous to basically let me live at the shop for a few years, ha ha! I could not have done this without the awesome team here at Fuller Moto. Bryan Fuller, Bryan Heidt, and Wes Hines have been such a tremendous help. I can’t thank these men enough.

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle

Turbo Maximus – Description

This is the first and only bike I’ve ever owned. I bought it used in complete stock form back in 2005. It is originally a 1982 black Yamaha XJ750 Maxim. As a stock bike, it ran well and I enjoyed riding it. But, I desired to make it better. As a XJ series owner and fan, I fell in love with the 1984 XJ750R (0U28) race bike that participated over in Japan in the 1984 Suzuka 8 Hours. It is the only xj series bike Yamaha ever raced and it is so beautiful!

While the bike has its own unique appearance, you can see a where a lot of the design and style inspiration comes from in the 0U28.

I wanted to challenge myself, not only from a fabrication standpoint, but from an engineering approach as well. I though to myself, how would an OEM build this? I have learned to respect the amount of engineering that a manufacturer puts into a model it wants to sell. Trying to match the level of OEM quality parts is a very difficult task.

My whole life, I’ve been strived to be an overachiever, failing many times, but never giving up. I think that’s how I got into this, Lord only knows. But I wanted to truly test myself and see if I could achieve this ambitious goal. The goal of building an old bike into a modern, fuel injected, boosted superbike! People said I was crazy, nuts! Why would you do that to a tired old XJ?

I say, why not! I wanted to prove them wrong.

Converting from carburation to EFI was no easy task. There is no kit and no real guide out there to help you install one. Most conversions are done on car applications, but a few have been successfully done on motorcycles. There are literally miles of wires, so packaging was a real challenge. I had to add a fuel pump, fuel filters, and a dozen or two of sensors. It took time, but I was able to route the system mostly hidden from the eye. There was a lot of trial & error setting this up. Lets say, it’s not for the faint of heart. I’m using a MS3 Pro ECU by DIYAutoTune. This allows me to have complete control over the fuel and ignition system.

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Engine

The ECU also directly controls the turbo too. With the desire of getting a perfect tune, monitoring proper fuel ratio is key. One way of monitoring is through a EGT sensor. By measuring the temperature of the exhaust as it leaves the combustion chamber, you can tell based on temperature, whether you are lean or rich. Typical applications use just one at the exhaust collector, but in a race environment, they use one per cylinder. I chose the latter. The data from the sensors is used by the ECU to make corrections on the fly to optimize the tune. Continuing with the EFI, 2003 Suzuki GSX-R 600 throttle bodies were used. These are a great choice because each individual body can be spaced to line up with your ports. The entire system communicates via CAN BUS to an AIM MXS dash.

The turbo system was also a real challenge.

My goal was to keep the turbo assembly as tight and integrated to the bike as possible. I wanted it to look like the bike was designed originally to be turbocharged. You see so many turbo bikes with either the turbo hanging way out and or the charge tube is wrapped around the engine, an afterthought. To avoid this, I picked a turbo (Borg Warner S1BG) big enough to give me my goal of 200 hp (on E85), but small enough to tuck in between the frame and front wheel. To hide the intake charge pipe, I cut a channel on the bottom right side of the tank so it could travel straight back from the intercooler hidden. Above the turbo I have a custom fabricated Bell intercooler to cool the air down from compressing it. The problem with this it took the location of the oil cooler. Also, by placing the turbo so close to the frame, I didn’t have clearance anymore for the oil filter.

The solution I found for this was to use a remote spin on adapter and rout the oil lines underneath the bike to the rear were I relocated the oil cooler just in front of the rear wheel. I also installed an inline oil filter from Peterson fluid systems. It all tucks up nicely underneath the chin fairing to allow for clearance. In 1983 actually Yamaha made a turbo XJ650 Seca. Internally, the Seca had a port for external scavenging, which is needed for a turbo. It is especially critical when the turbo is lower than the engine. This scavenging port on the oil pump allows me to suck the oil from the turbo back into the engine to avoid oil pooling. It was a direct swap of oil pumps from XJ650 turbo to the XJ900, bolt in.

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Rear

To continue with the OEM theme, I decided to use “AN” fittings for almost all fluid hoses. This was also formidable because of the many tight spaces to plumb. I also used Jiffy-Tite quick-connect “dry break” fittings on the fuel tank for easy removal.

Body / Frame / Suspension

⁃ The front part of the frame is original. I fabricated the tail section and swingarm.
⁃ I converted the rear suspension from a dual rear shock into a mono.
⁃ 5 way adjustable piggyback rear shock.
⁃ 2015 Yamaha R6 Front Suspension with Traxxion Dynamics AK-20 Cartridges.
⁃ Adjustable Sterering Stabilizer by Ohlins.
⁃ Rear wheel is from XJ900S in Europe (widened from 4” to 5” to allow a wider tire) with FZ1 rear caliper and FZR 1000 brake rotor.
⁃ Tires are Metzeler Racetec RR K2 compound (front 120/70 ZR17 Rear 160/60 ZR 17).
⁃ CRG race clutch & brake controls.
⁃ Suzuki GSX-R 600 foot Controls.
⁃ Custom labeled Moto GP controls By Breese Racing in Australia.
⁃ Front fairing is a F1 replica by Airtech-Streamlining. This has been heavily modified to fit. I made aluminum fins on the bottoms that are riveted, a custom headlight bezel handmade from aluminum. The fairing needed to be widened and pulled back at the windshield area. Fiberglass work was done by Patrick Henry of Atlanta.
⁃ Windscreen was custom made by Gustafsson Plastics.
⁃ Headlight by J.W. Speaker.
⁃ The tank is from a 1977 Yamaha XS750. I had to relocate the mounts and fabricated in the Dual Fuel cap made by RaceFit in England.
⁃ Rear tail is completely custom one-off, hand-made rear light trim of aluminum.
⁃ Rear brake & turn signal lights are by The Retrofit Source.
⁃ Lower chin is from XJ900F in Europe (modified).
⁃ All pieces that are riveted on the body are hand-made from aluminum.
⁃ The frame laser scanned measured and straightened for precise alignment at GMD Computrack of Atlanta.
⁃ Seat upholstery is Relicate Alcantara & carbon black leather done by Cheryl Lyons of Atlanta.
⁃ Paint was Done By the talented Mike Lewis of Gary’s Body Shop in Atlanta.
⁃ Frame was Powder coated by Miller’s Powder Coating in Atlanta.
⁃ Bike weight 213 kg or 469 Lbs.
⁃ Rake 24.20 degrees.
⁃ Trail 101.1 mm or 3.98 inches.
⁃ Wheelbase is 1395.17 mm or 54.93 inches.

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Intercooler

Engine

⁃ The 750cc engine was swap with it’s bigger brother the 1983 XJ900 engine (900cc).
⁃ The 900cc engine has been fully rebuilt by renowned NASCAR engine builder Jordan Hersey of Atlanta.
⁃ 200 hp on E85 gas.
⁃ 9:1 custom forged pistons from JE Pistons.
⁃ Adjustable camshaft sprockets from FZ750.
⁃ High tech lightweight titanium race valve springs set from Kibblewhite precision.
⁃ Custom Lockout clutch designed by Eric Isaacson owner of E-FAB in Des Monies.
⁃ Larger stator swapped from XJ700 Midnight Maxim to bump the amps from 18 to 26 amps. Every amp counts when converting to EFI.
⁃ Custom 321 stainless steel header and exhaust.
⁃ Titanium Akrapovič slip-on muffler.
⁃ Custom fabricated intercooler with a core from Bell Intercoolers.
⁃ Borg-Warner S1BG Turbo (39mm inducer, 46mm exducer).
⁃ Turbosmart Supersonic blow-off valve.
⁃ Vibrant HD Clamp-On custom intake charge tube.
⁃ Moroso remote oil filter spin on adapter.
⁃ Peterson 400 series 60 micron inline oil filter.
⁃ Earl’s stainless fuel filters.
⁃ Earl’s 25 row oil cooler with Spal electric fan.
⁃ Race undercut transmission by M/T Performance.
⁃ ARP Stainless 12pt bolts everywhere
⁃ All lines are “AN” fittings.
⁃ Custom aluminum intake air box and charge tube.
⁃ Engine painted satin black by Mike Lewis of Gary’s Body Shop in Atlanta.

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle

EFI System

⁃ MS3 Pro by DIYAutoTune.
⁃ GM “LS” truck coils for each cylinder.
⁃ AIM MXS dash with GPS speed and position tracking.
⁃ Pressure and temperature sensors by KA Sensors.
⁃ Bosch knock sensor.
⁃ EGT sensors in all four header tubes.
⁃ Custom camshaft position sensor retrofitted for sequential injection capability.
⁃ Innovate O2 sensor management.
⁃ Electronic boost solenoid controlled by ECU.
⁃ Walbro external inline fuel pump.
⁃ MotoBrain power distribution with WIFI control.
⁃ MotoGadget RF keyless power switch.
⁃ 2003 Suzuki GSX-R 600 throttle bodies with 550cc injectors.
⁃ Anti-Gravity 8-cell lithium-ion battery.

Follow Derek On Instagram Here

Hat Tip – Bike EXIF

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Back

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Front Fairing

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Rear Cowl

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Exhaust

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Dash

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Brake Light

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Dashboard

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Rear Wheel

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Fuel Tank

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Headlight

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Front Brake

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Engine

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Handlebar

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Handlebar

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Headlight 2

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Headlight

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Engine 2

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Intake

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle Rear Cowl

Yamaha Turbo Maximus Motorcycle

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The Amphibious Dobbertin HydroCar – A $1 Million Dollar 762 HP Boat/Car Hybrid https://silodrome.com/amphibious-hydrocar/ Wed, 22 Aug 2018 07:01:51 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82642 The Amphibious Dobbertin HydroCar – A $1 Million Dollar 762 HP Boat/Car Hybrid

The Dobbertin HydroCar is an amphibious vehicle that took 10 years to develop with over $1 million USD invested in research, development, and construction. The HydroCar can be driven on land for extended periods thanks to its articulated sponsons (side pontoons) that can be raised or lowered. In the raised position the four wheels are...

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The Amphibious Dobbertin HydroCar – A $1 Million Dollar 762 HP Boat/Car Hybrid

The Dobbertin HydroCar is an amphibious vehicle that took 10 years to develop with over $1 million USD invested in research, development, and construction.

The HydroCar can be driven on land for extended periods thanks to its articulated sponsons (side pontoons) that can be raised or lowered. In the raised position the four wheels are in contact with the ground, and in the lowered position the sponsons form a tunnel-hull speedboat.

Meet Rick Dobbertin

The unique amphibious vehicle is the brainchild of famed car designer, car builder, and previous amphibious car designer Rick Dobbertin. Rick spent most of his career building high-performance cars, he won the Hot Rod Magazine’s 1982 Street Machine of the Year and the 1982 (and 1983) Car Craft Street Machine Nationals.

Rick went on to win the Hot Rod Magazine’s 1986 Hot Rod of the Year award and won all four of the major national magazine-sponsored shows in 1986 – The Hot Rod Supernationals, The Popular Hot Rodding Super Street Meet, The Car Craft Street Machine Nationals, and the Hot Rod Super Cruise.

The Dobbertin Surface Orbiter

After this staggering slew of successes Rick turned his attention to designing and building one of the most remarkable vehicles of its time – the Dobbertin Surface Orbiter. This huge cylindrical amphibious machine was designed to circumnavigate the Earth – over land and sea with no outside assistance.

Rick and Karen Dobbertin covered 27,300 miles on land, 3,000 miles in the water, and visited 28 countries and 38 states before they ran out of funds and had to shelve the project. They had proven the capabilities of the Dobbertin Surface Orbiter, and with a couple more 0s on the end of their bank balance there’s little doubt they would have made it.

The Amphibious Dobbertin HydroCar

The Dobbertin HydroCar was designed by Rick using the lessons learned with the Surface Orbiter. This new vehicle wasn’t intended to circumnavigate the world – it was intended to be a cross between a GT car and a speedboat, and Rick Dobbertin is one of the few people on earth capable of making it a reality.

The central body section of the HydroCar is a space frame, with marine-grade 5086 aluminum used to create the frames inside the sponsons. The bodywork is attached to the spaceframe, giving both a low weight and excellent rigidity.

The HydroCar is powered by a Bill Mitchell Racing 762 hp V8 engine with a four-speed manual Quadzilla 4L80-E transmission, it has pneumatic suspension, and four-wheel power disc brakes. Behind the transmission there’s an Atlas gear-driven transfer case that can send power forwards to the front wheels for land mode or backwards to the prop when it’s in water mode.

Rick designed the HydroCar to have a potential top speed on land of 125+ mph, with a top speed on water of 60+ mph – though so far as we’re aware the top speeds haven’t yet been fully explored.

Inside the cockpit of the HydroCar you’ll find two seats and a dashboard that has strong aviation design influences, with 45 control switches, 16 LED monitoring systems, and 25 VDO gauges, while three hydraulic levers control the up and down movement of the sponsons, axles, and wheel-well doors.

The HydroCar is due to roll (or float) across the auction block with Worldwide Auctioneers on the Auburn Auction on the 1st of September, there’s currently no price estimate, and there’s no reserve. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

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A Technical Drawing By Ettore Bugatti https://silodrome.com/technical-drawing-ettore-bugatti/ Mon, 20 Aug 2018 04:00:20 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=82721 A Technical Drawing By Ettore Bugatti

Ettore Bugatti was one of the early motoring world’s greatest characters, almost as famous for his gruff and oftentimes hilarious customer service as he was for his engineering genius. On dealing with a customer who was complaining about the lackluster braking performance on his new car Ettore yelled “I make my cars to go, not...

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A Technical Drawing By Ettore Bugatti

Ettore Bugatti was one of the early motoring world’s greatest characters, almost as famous for his gruff and oftentimes hilarious customer service as he was for his engineering genius.

On dealing with a customer who was complaining about the lackluster braking performance on his new car Ettore yelled “I make my cars to go, not stop!” – later he encountered a customer who was frustrated that his car had trouble starting on cold mornings, to which he quipped “Sir! If you can afford a Type 35, you can surely afford a heated garage!”

This technical drawing was penned by Bugatti himself in November 1943, just a scant 4 years before his death in 1947, and it’s now a reminder that he kept working right up until the point he couldn’t. The framed drawing was given to Hugh Conway as a gift by l’Ebé Bugatti, Ettore’s daughter, in 1966.

The similarities between Da Vinci and Bugatti have been made countless times previously so I won’t rehash them here except to note the similarity between this Bugatti drawing and the sketches of Da Vinci that pre-date it by just a few centuries.

If you’d like to read more about this piece or register to bid on it you can click here to visit the listing on Bonhams, it has an estimated hammer price of between £500 and £700.

Official Description

A Technical Drawing By Ettore Bugatti – Pencil sketch on paper, dated 5/11/43, with annotations in Bugatti’s hand-writing, 13 x 19cm, framed and glazed. This original drawing was given to Hugh Conway by l’Ebé Bugatti in 1966, there is a hand written note confirming this common mounted within the frame.

A Technical Drawing By Ettore Bugatti Script

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MotoGP™ Technology – The Must-Read Book by Neil Spalding https://silodrome.com/motogp-technology-book-neil-spalding/ Tue, 24 Jul 2018 05:00:47 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=81558 MotoGP™ Technology – The Must-Read Book by Neil Spalding

The book MotoGP™ Technology by Neil Spalding is officially licensed by MotoGP™, and it’s widely recognized as an essential book to get your hands on if you want an in-depth working knowledge of modern motorcycle engineering. Neil started racing motorcycles in 1980 and enjoyed a long club career – winning two championships in his competitive...

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MotoGP™ Technology – The Must-Read Book by Neil Spalding

The book MotoGP™ Technology by Neil Spalding is officially licensed by MotoGP™, and it’s widely recognized as an essential book to get your hands on if you want an in-depth working knowledge of modern motorcycle engineering.

Neil started racing motorcycles in 1980 and enjoyed a long club career – winning two championships in his competitive career. In 1995 he worked closely with legendary motorcycle journalist Alan Cathcart to persuade SBK to run the European Supermono series, at the time this was the only race series to encourage prototype four-strokes.

Since the beginning of modern MotoGP in 2002 Neil has been intimately involved with the sport, documenting each team’s engineering updates each season, and writing about MotoGP technology for a selection of motorcycle magazines and newspapers around the world.

Perhaps the best thing about this book is its approachability, you don’t need to be an engineer to understand it, you just need a passion for motorcycles. Though many of us ride older (and simpler) bikes it’s always fascinating to me to learn about the cutting edge, it’s the love of the engineering that keeps many of us wrenching away in our garages at two o’clock in the morning after all.

Buy Here

MotoGP Technology Book Neil Spalding

Official Description:

MotoGP Technology; 3rd Edition. MotoGP was created as the 21st-century pinnacle of motorcycle racing. The intention was to create the most powerful and fastest motorcycles ever made, to develop the technologies needed to win, and to use those technologies to improve the motorcycles we see on the road every day. The bikes are all prototypes, developed for one purpose, lapping the Grand Prix circuits of the world as fast as possible.

MotoGP commands the best factories, engineers and riders and there are now six factories on the grid. Each has its own views of how a winning bike should be designed. This is the third edition of Neil Spalding’s acclaimed MotoGP Technology book. Available from November 2017 as an Officially Licenced MotoGP publication it is right up to date and packed with colourful detail. Neil tells the inside story of the bikes in the MotoGP pit lane, providing new insight into the design of these racing motorcycles, including: A review of all the point-scoring bikes of the last decade. An analysis of all the different factors affecting the design of a racing motorcycle. The technologies and skills they have had to master including: Chassis development, including the science of chassis flex. Aerodynamic changes and the various designs of wings in use.

The design of seamless shift gearboxes. Easy-to-follow graphs and tables showing the science of machine development at the summit of motorcycle sport. Containing over 300 pages and 650 superb colour photographs and illustrations, most from Neil’s own unique archive, this book provides a fascinating insight into how the bike factories compete at the very top of the game. ‘This book is a milestone in helping people to better understand how racing motorcycles work…’ Senior MotoGP engineer. Neil Spalding ‘@Spalders’ has specialised in photographing and writing about MotoGP Technology for the last 15 years. This is his 3rd Book on the subject.

MotoGP Technology Book Neil Spalding Inside

MotoGP Technology Book Neil Spalding Inside 2

MotoGP Technology Book Neil Spalding Cover Main

MotoGP Technology Book Neil Spalding Back

Images courtesy of Dragon Papillon and Neil Spalding

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The Most Expensive Motorcycle In The World – The Vincent Black Lightning https://silodrome.com/vincent-black-lightning-motorcycle/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 10:09:16 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=81334 The Most Expensive Motorcycle In The World – The Vincent Black Lightning

The Vincent Black Lightning was the fastest and most desirable motorcycle in the world when it was released in 1948. A factory-delivered Black Lightning was capable of 150 mph if you were brave enough, and no small amount of bravery was required as braking technology hadn’t yet caught up with rapidly increasing horsepower levels. The...

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The Most Expensive Motorcycle In The World – The Vincent Black Lightning

The Vincent Black Lightning was the fastest and most desirable motorcycle in the world when it was released in 1948. A factory-delivered Black Lightning was capable of 150 mph if you were brave enough, and no small amount of bravery was required as braking technology hadn’t yet caught up with rapidly increasing horsepower levels.

The Vincent Black Lightning

The Vincent Black Lightning project began life when London Vincent dealer Jack Surtees ordered a bespoke Vincent Rapide in 1947 with a significantly upgraded engine for racing. The Surtees engine was built alongside one other, which would go into the bike that would become known “Gunga Din” – the prototype test-bed for the motorcycles that would evolve into the Vincent Black Shadow and the Vincent Black Lightning.

If the name Surtees sounds vaguely familiar to you and you can’t quite put your finger on it, you may be thinking of Jack’s son John, who is still the only man to win Grand Prix World Championships on both two wheels and four.

The V-twin used in the Rapide, Black Shadow, and Black Lightning was designed by Australian engineer Phil Irving. The story goes that Phil had blueprints of the Vincent Meteor single-cylinder engine on his desk, the way the blueprints were accidentally overlaid showed him that a V-twin could work perfectly using the barrels and heads of the single, just needing a new crankcase, crank, and a few other parts to work.

Vincent Black Lightning Main

Later in his career Irving would develop the Repco V8 RB620 engine used by Australian driver Jack Brabham to win the 1966 Formula 1 Driver’s and Manufacturers’ Championship against the best drivers and engineers in the world.

The Black Lightning wasn’t developed for street use (though they could be licensed for the road), they were intended for racing, and land speed record attempts.

The 998cc V-twin was built specifically for performance, magnesium alloy components components were used extensively, high-performance Vincent cams with higher lift and more overlap were used, highly-polished Vibrac connecting rods and high-compression Specialoid pistons were installed, the combustion chambers and rockers were polished, the heads were ported and polished, and twin 1¼ inch Amal 10TT9 carburetors were installed.

These highly-tuned engines were capable of 70 bhp – 15 more than the 55 bhp V-twins used in the Black Shadow. The kerb weight was a spritely 170 kilograms, notably less than the 208 kilogram weight of the Black Shadow.

The 150 top speed was tested by a few including the legendary Rollie Free took his modified Black Lighting to a new US national motorcycle speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats in 1948 (pictured below).

Rollie Free Vincent Black Lightning

The 1949 Vincent Black Lightning Shown Here

Over the course of the 1948 to 1952 production run Vincent-HRD built just 33 examples of the Black Lightning, and it’s believed that just 19 numbers-matching examples still exist.

Collectors have begun referring to the model as the “Ferrari GTO of two wheels” in recent years as the prices have begun shooting skyward – the most expensive motorcycle ever sold at auction was a Vincent Black Lighting ridden by Jack Ehret to a new Australian land speed record, it fetched almost $1 million at auction.

The Black Lightning you see here is just the second one that was ever made, it was ordered by Swiss racer (and NSU factory team racer) Hans Stärkle. Impressively the bike has full ownership history from new, and it’s the earliest most original example in existence.

The interest in this bike will be global when it rolls across the auction block with Bonhams at the Barber Motorsports Museum in Birmingham, Alabama on the 6th of October. The current estimated hammer price is $400,000 to $500,000 USD, and you can click here to see more or register to bid.

 

Vincent Black Lightning Motorcycle

Vincent Black Lightning Back

Vincent Black Lightning Left Side

Vincent Black Lightning Rear

Vincent Black Lightning

Vincent Black Lightning Left Front

Vincent Black Lightning Front Angle

Vincent Black Lightning Front

Vincent Black Lightning Racing

Vincent Black Lightning Vintage

Images courtesy of Bonhams

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Airfix Combustion Engine Kit – A Transparent Working Engine Model https://silodrome.com/airfix-engine-kit-model/ Wed, 18 Jul 2018 04:00:20 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=80883 Airfix Combustion Engine Kit – A Transparent Working Engine Model

The Airfix Combustion Engine Kit is a model engine powered by batteries that has red lights in the spark plugs to show firing order. It works mechanically just like a real engine, with a crankshaft and cam, conrods and pistons, rocker arms and valves. It’s driven by a small electric motor that requires 3 x...

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Airfix Combustion Engine Kit – A Transparent Working Engine Model

The Airfix Combustion Engine Kit is a model engine powered by batteries that has red lights in the spark plugs to show firing order. It works mechanically just like a real engine, with a crankshaft and cam, conrods and pistons, rocker arms and valves.

It’s driven by a small electric motor that requires 3 x AA batteries and it’s recommended for people from 8 to 18 years of age – although if you’d like to brush up on your working knowledge of how engines function, this kit is an ideal refresher for age groups over 18 also.

The kit includes 100 parts and it comes with a screwdriver, assembly time varies depending on the skill and experience of the model builder, though most people from age 10 up can do it largely independently by following the instructions.

Buy Here

Airfix Combustion Engine Kit - A Transparent Working Engine Model Box

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Short Film: Constructing a Car Engine In The 1930s https://silodrome.com/constructing-a-car-engine/ Sun, 01 Jul 2018 05:01:57 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=79405 Short Film: Constructing a Car Engine In The 1930s

This short film shows what went into building a car engine back in the 1930s, including casting, forging, machining, assembly, and testing. It’s a remarkable look back at how it was done before the robots took over, the amount of hand work required is impressive – as is the somewhat casual nature of the safety...

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Short Film: Constructing a Car Engine In The 1930s

This short film shows what went into building a car engine back in the 1930s, including casting, forging, machining, assembly, and testing.

It’s a remarkable look back at how it was done before the robots took over, the amount of hand work required is impressive – as is the somewhat casual nature of the safety precautions taken.

The film starts with a look at the casting processes, you’ll see a crankshaft being made, this is followed by machining, and the processes involved in connecting rod, piston, and camshaft fabrication.

It ends with footage of the engines being assembled, before being tested on the bench. The film was created by Morris Motors, so as you can imagine it’s a little breathless in its praise of the company, but even that offers an insight into the era.

Constructing a Car Engine

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