Design – Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Tue, 23 Jan 2018 04:01:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 The Original Fisher Astronaut Space Pen https://silodrome.com/original-fisher-astronaut-space-pen/ Thu, 18 Jan 2018 07:00:21 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=70350 The Original Fisher Astronaut Space Pen

Fisher Astronaut Space Pens have been used on every manned NASA space mission since Apollo 7 in 1968, the pen also features prominently in a now legendary episode of Seinfeld that was fittingly titled “The Pen” (episode 3, season 3). Engineers spent years developing the space pen, ensuring that it could not only write upside...

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The Original Fisher Astronaut Space Pen

Fisher Astronaut Space Pens have been used on every manned NASA space mission since Apollo 7 in 1968, the pen also features prominently in a now legendary episode of Seinfeld that was fittingly titled “The Pen” (episode 3, season 3).

Engineers spent years developing the space pen, ensuring that it could not only write upside down, but also write underwater, over grease, in extreme temperatures, in a vacuum, and on almost any material.

The secret to its success is a pressurized ink cartridge guarantees an even, dependable flow of ink in all conditions. Fisher offers a full lifetime warrantee on all pens, a safe bet considering their solid brass construction and well-engineered internals.

Each pen measures in at 5″ long and 0.375″ in diameter at the widest point, and they have a retractable, replaceable cartridge with a side release button.

These are great pens to have around the garage or workshop, they’re 100% made in the USA, and they ship out in a heavy duty box, with one Fisher Pressurized PR4 cartridge with a medium point and black ink. These pens may not be cheap, but they’ll probably be the last one you ever buy. Unless you give it to Jerry of course.

Buy Here

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Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi https://silodrome.com/death-machines-london-airforce-moto-guzzi/ Tue, 16 Jan 2018 06:00:50 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=70311 Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

This feature was written by James Hilton, the proprietor of Death Machines of London. When possible we like to give custom builders the opportunity to tell the story of their bike, to give an insight into their thought process and methodology. – Designed in memory of Giovanni Ravelli: WW1 fighter pilot, motorcycle racer, and one of...

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Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

This feature was written by James Hilton, the proprietor of Death Machines of London. When possible we like to give custom builders the opportunity to tell the story of their bike, to give an insight into their thought process and methodology.

Designed in memory of Giovanni Ravelli: WW1 fighter pilot, motorcycle racer, and one of the founders of Moto Guzzi. Inspired by one of Giovanni’s biplanes and the Futurist movies of the time, Airforce has been released on the birthday of the aviation pioneer.

From the hand formed bodywork, to the aviation inspired chassis and wheels, Ravelli’s influence has shaped Airforce. In fact, pretty much every design decision began with ‘what would Giovanni do?’.

The Beginnings

The donor motorcycle, a 1982 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk2, was discovered in a yard in southern Italy, having been involved in an argument with a truck. Left outside, it was quietly corroding away in the sun and salty air.

Despite its condition the potential was obvious and upon delivery back to our works in London, the strip down began. The engine was found to be in remarkable condition, with no major problems discovered. A full forensic inspection, vapour cleaning & reassembly, along with replacement bearings, seals gaskets completed the main engine work. The cylinder heads were subjected to a total refresh, along with our signature gas flowing. Carburation is through a pair of modified 36mm pumper Dell’Orto carburettors. The package is completed with our in-house velocity stacks and open slash cut headers.

Guzzi’s legendary ‘Tonti’ frame works. That is a fact. They handle well, you pick a line and they follow it, so any modification had to be limited. Our ‘what would Giovanni do?’ version of ‘limited’ was to radically modify, in the spirit of those pioneering times of course. Giovanni would have approved. As well as the obligatory de-lugging and subframe modifications, a custom in-house head stock was manufactured, to increase the rake by 3 degrees to 30. The original swing arm was swapped out for a heavily modified Moto Guzzi California swinging arm which was braced and coupled to a mono shock cantilevered system. Not something we’ve seen done before.

The frame and front wheel were then coated in our custom ‘Airforce Grey’, mixed specifically for this project. The wheels are modified California Hubs, laced to 21×3.00 aluminium rims, the rear utilising hand spun aluminium disc covers. Tyres are period Firestone items. The front end is a highly customised Aprillia RS250 arrangement, re-valved and refinished, while the rear suspension unit is an aviation-inspired bespoke item courtesy of Hagon.

Braking is taken care of by a pair of billet four pot Brembo calipers, operated remotely via cable to a Brembo RCS master cylinder. Designed and built in house, the 300mm rotors are one off DMOL designed steel items.

Engineering that has more in common with watchmaking, than with motorcycle building.

All the controls on Airforce are custom-made: clip-on tubes, grips, and internal throttle have all been fabricated in-house with pegs and controls working on modified Stucchi gear change linkage. Airforce also features our first set of completely custom levers: the inverse Lever Type IN01. Precision machined from aviation grade aluminium, the IN01’s will soon be available to buy as a part.

An M-Unit and custom loom controls the machines electric functions, with a single Xenon projector light working both hi and low beam and an LED rear light housed in our custom cluster. The speedometer has been redesigned and precision etched in nickel silver and brass, with dimmable radial illumination through a dedicated controller. Now, we know they didn’t have electric guitars and amps back in Giovanni’s day, but we like to think he’d be into his Foo Fighters, so ignition comes courtesy of a ¼ inch guitar jack with a built in immobiliser proximity sensor. Because hell yeah.

Hand-beaten aluminium bodywork that says one thing: Speed.

And finally to that bodywork. Beaten and welded by the hand of DMOL’s master craftsman, all the panelling has been built using the classic buck technique, where a wood skeleton is wrapped in aluminium – something Giovanni would’ve appreciated. This process, for obvious reasons, leaves imperfections – tiny hammer dents, small weld holes and the like. These are usually covered with filler and paintwork, but instead we chose to leave the metal raw and simply brush it – reminiscent of the WW1 fighter that was our inspiration for the project.

The front fairing slots into the side of the fuel tank, creating uninterrupted flowing lines. The lower concave curve of the fuel tank is mirror polished to reflect the high-gloss paint finish on the inside of the front fairing – the only part of the bodywork that is given this treatment. The bellypan is double-skinned, enclosing the exhaust pipes. Finally, the Italian leather seat features a hand-stitched pattern based on air-flow to enhance the impression of movement.

Airforce was built in 112 days (just in time for BikeShed 2017). So why did we wait so long to tell anyone about it? Because it needed to be better. There were parts we could’ve left alone without anyone noticing, except we noticed. It would’ve been far easier to not remake the belly pan or re-engineer entirely new levers. That would’ve been the easy thing to do. But as Mr. Giovanni Ravelli knew: the meek are seldom remembered.

Airforce is for sale at £70,000.00 – Click here to enquire on Death Machines of London

Follow Death Machines of London on FacebookTwitterInstagram

About Giovanni Ravelli

14 January 1887 – 11 August 1919
Ravelli and Carlo Guzzi served together as pilots in the Italian Air Corps during WW1, where they met the mechanic Giorgio Parodi and discovered they shared a common passion: motorcycles. They then decided they would start building them together. Unfortunately Ravelli was killed in a test flight accident and never officially joined the company. So to pay tribute to him they set the Airman Eagle as the centrepiece of the logo of their new company, Moto Guzzi.

About Death Machines of London

Founded by designer James Hilton and engineer Ray Petty, Death Machines of London is rapidly making a name for itself as one of the UK’s most innovative automotive design brands. DMOL represents the imaginative application of art and engineering to create beautiful bespoke machinery.

First – The Bike Shed

Photography by Ivo Ivanov

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1968 Molzon Concept Corsa GT38 https://silodrome.com/molzon-concept-corsa-gt38/ Sat, 13 Jan 2018 10:00:56 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=70063 1968 Molzon Concept Corsa GT38

The One-Off Molzon Concept Corsa GT38 The Molzon Concept Corsa GT38 is a one-off sports car developed by William “Bill” Molzon – a visionary GM designer who worked closely with under Larry Shinoda on some of most successful models in the history of Chevrolet. Molzon went to work at General Motors immediately after graduating with...

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1968 Molzon Concept Corsa GT38

The One-Off Molzon Concept Corsa GT38

The Molzon Concept Corsa GT38 is a one-off sports car developed by William “Bill” Molzon – a visionary GM designer who worked closely with under Larry Shinoda on some of most successful models in the history of Chevrolet.

Molzon went to work at General Motors immediately after graduating with a B.S. degree in Industrial Design from the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. Although his day job consumed the overwhelming majority of his time, he still had a desire to create a car that was 100% his own design – with no input from upper management or restrictions from the bean-counters.

He started the project in 1963 with a blank slate and an ambitious plan. He decided to see if he could design and build a car with better acceleration than the fastest Corvette, the fuel economy of a Corvair, and the refined handling capabilities of a Lotus.

It was clear from the outset that he was going to need a car with a rigid, lightweight space frame chassis and independent suspension on all corners, coupled to a lightweight, bespoke fiberglass body.

The initial design for the car had more of an angular wedge shape which would have pre-dated similar designs from the minds of Gandini and Guigiaro, however Molzon developed the design into its current far more curvaceous shape as it offered significantly better aerodynamics.

The Chassis and Suspension

The chassis was designed and welded together on a jig, it uses mostly 1 inch steel tubing with a 90 inch wheelbase, a 136 inch overall length, and a semi-monocoque front sub-structure. The initial design for the chassis was actually developed while Molzon was still in college, and he even structurally tested a scale model of the frame in the school lab.

Front suspension is made up of unequal length wishbones, with the lower arms consisting of a transverse strut and a leading arm with anti-dive geometry. Rear suspension is upper link with a reversed lower A-arm, twin trailing arms, and anti-squat geometry.

The Corvair Engine and Porsche Transaxle

Molzon chose the Chevrolet Corvair engine for his one-off car, he was drawn to it because of its lightweight aluminium construction and air-cooling – doing away with the need for coolant, a water jacket, and a radiator. A flat-6 Corvair motor was ordered from Corvair racer Don Eichstaedt, who built the engine to be reliably capable of 200 bhp, once Molzon received it  was installed in a rear-mid location directly behind the cockpit for optimal weight distribution.

Once of the biggest single issues with the build was sourcing a suitable transaxle for the Corvair engine. Eventually it was realized that a new Porsche model called the 901 (which would become the 911) had a similar flat-6 engine, and so a transaxle was ordered from Germany, then modified to fit the Corvair engine.

When it came time to create the body, Molzon cut down a series of Styrofoam blocks to match sections of his full-scale surface development drawing, glued them together. Each piece then underwent final trimming and surfacing, before it was sealed. Once it was ready the fiberglass was laid, with the final form being ready in the summer of 1967.

The Completed Car

Once the final fit and finish was done and the electrics and interior were installed, the car was ready for primetime. A 1970 Road & Track Magazine article about the car sang its praises:

“To say that the now complete car is quick and agile is an understatement – even the usually cool Molzon confesses to being a little un-nerved by the alacrity of its acceleration and directional responsiveness beyond expectation.”

The fact that the car is quick should come as no surprise, it weighs in at 1,100 lbs and has 200 bhp, giving it a power-to-weight ratio that will comfortably embarrass many far more modern sports cars.

Molzon kept the car in pride of place in his personal collection for 50 years, it only covered 950 miles – a few of those in autocross competition. In early 2017 at the age of 78 he decided to offer his prize one-off automobile design for public sale for the first time, accompanied by an original copy of the 1970 Road & Track Magazine featuring the car, hundreds of invoices for the parts used to create the car, and a hard cover brochure detailing each process of the build.

If you’d like to read more about the car or register to bid, you can click here to visit the listing on Bonhams.

Images courtesy of Bonhams

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1954 Plymouth Belmont Concept Car https://silodrome.com/plymouth-belmont-concept-car/ Wed, 03 Jan 2018 10:00:02 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=69747 1954 Plymouth Belmont Concept Car

The 1954 Plymouth Belmont was designed as a possible production car, though sadly it never received the green light for a production run. Plymouth Vice President of Design Virgil Exner couldn’t bare to see it scrapped as often happened with these “dream cars”, so he negotiated a special arrangement with the company to let him keep...

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1954 Plymouth Belmont Concept Car

The 1954 Plymouth Belmont was designed as a possible production car, though sadly it never received the green light for a production run.

Plymouth Vice President of Design Virgil Exner couldn’t bare to see it scrapped as often happened with these “dream cars”, so he negotiated a special arrangement with the company to let him keep the car for his own personal use – a highly unusual move at the time.

It’s because of this that the Belmont survived to the modern day, where many of its contemporaries were relegated to the crusher.

The Plymouth Belmont

It’s thought that the Plymouth Division of the Chrysler Corporation were seriously considering selling the Belmont in significant numbers. They built the concept car using a standard Plymouth chassis with a 157 hp poly-head 241 cubic inch V8, drum brakes all round, a Hy-drive transmission, and a solid axle at the back.

The sweeping red body was styled by Briggs Manufacturing, a prolific manufacturer of car bodies for Ford, Chrysler, and LeBaron. Briggs had been acquired by Chrysler in 1953, and put to work almost immediately on the Belmont project. It was decided to use the then-new and cutting edge material called “fiberglass” in the construction of the body.

The first fiberglass-bodied automobile had only been developed 8 years earlier in 1948 (the unusual Stout Scarab), and the material was generating a lot of interest due to its strength, low-cost, lightness, and its ability to be easily molded into very complex shapes.

Once the styling of the body was completed, a mold was created, and the fiberglass was laid. Rather than creating a large number of smaller sections and piecing them together, the team created large panels, a risky move considering the general lack of experience with composites.

The design called for the convertible top to be entirely hidden behind the seats in a compartment, door handles were not fitted as was common at the time with roadsters, and you needed to reach inside the door to open it.

The interior of the Belmont was designed to be opulent, with radio and air conditioner controls in the center console, a centrally-mounted extendible radio antenna, and an expansive dashboard with seven gauges to keep you abreast of the vehicle’s current speed and operating condition.

The seats, console, doors and upper dashboard were upholstered in grey leather, and theres a small centrally-located rear vision mirror mounted on the dash.

In recent years the Plymouth Belmont benefitted from a comprehensive restoration to original condition. Since its restoration it has been shown at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance where it received a warm welcome due to its iconic design, and for the fact that it was Virgil Exner’s own personal car for many years.

Back in 2014 the Belmont was sold at auction for $1,320,000 USD, and it’s now due to be offered for sale via Barrett-Jackson in Scottsdale Arizona between the 13th and 21st of January. If you’d like to read more about the car or register to bid you can click here to view the listing.

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Scooter Headlight Desk Lamp https://silodrome.com/scooter-headlight-desk-lamp/ Fri, 29 Dec 2017 06:00:19 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=69608 Scooter Headlight Desk Lamp

This desk lamp is made from a vintage scooter headlight, and a chrome 1960s-era photography tripod. It’s the work of The Modern Weld a boutique company that combines a love for interior design with a passion for vintage motorcycles. The team discovered a new-old-stock scooter headlight being sold as part of a warehouse closure, they...

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Scooter Headlight Desk Lamp

This desk lamp is made from a vintage scooter headlight, and a chrome 1960s-era photography tripod. It’s the work of The Modern Weld a boutique company that combines a love for interior design with a passion for vintage motorcycles.

The team discovered a new-old-stock scooter headlight being sold as part of a warehouse closure, they paired it with a beautifully preserved tripod, then added an LED light, and a period-correct red and white cloth covered cord.

Buy Here

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Halley Helmet Rack https://silodrome.com/halley-helmet-rack/ Fri, 08 Dec 2017 04:00:09 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=68372 Halley Helmet Rack

The Halley Helmet Rack has been designed as a helmet holder you might actually want in your home, with a large spherical ball to distribute weight evenly and avoid pressure points on the helmet’s delicate EPS foam. Helmet racks are a great way to store and showcase helmets, and it’s a much better way to...

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Halley Helmet Rack

The Halley Helmet Rack has been designed as a helmet holder you might actually want in your home, with a large spherical ball to distribute weight evenly and avoid pressure points on the helmet’s delicate EPS foam.

Helmet racks are a great way to store and showcase helmets, and it’s a much better way to store them than placing them on a flat surface like a table or desk, as this tends to allow sweat and moisture to fester and begin causing problems with mould.

Each Halley Helmet Rack has a laser cut backing plate, with a bent steel arm, and a stainless steel sphere – and they can be assembled in 5 minutes and installed in another 5, so long as you have a drill handy.

Order Here

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AGV X3000 AGO 1 Full Face Helmet https://silodrome.com/agv-x3000-ago-1-helmet/ Thu, 07 Dec 2017 03:00:32 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=68185 AGV X3000 AGO 1 Full Face Helmet

The new AGV X3000 AGO 1 is a classically-styled full face helmet from the famed Italian company that’s likely to find a long list of prospective buyers. Retro lids like this are one of the fastest growing market segments in the motorcycle helmet world, and many of the major manufacturers either already have retro helmets out,...

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AGV X3000 AGO 1 Full Face Helmet

The new AGV X3000 AGO 1 is a classically-styled full face helmet from the famed Italian company that’s likely to find a long list of prospective buyers.

Retro lids like this are one of the fastest growing market segments in the motorcycle helmet world, and many of the major manufacturers either already have retro helmets out, or have them in development.

The X3000 AGO 1 is part of the new AGV Legends series, each designed to look like classic helmets from the golden era, but built with modern materials and methods, to pass modern safety certification.

AGV based the design of the X3000 on the helmet worn by Giacomo Agostini, with the AGO 1 featuring a shell colour scheme similar to the one favourited by the legendary Italian rider. The helmet even keeps the contoured chin piece, which Agostini liked so he could lean down on the tank at speed.

The helmet has a clever ventilation device hidden within the visor port, and there’s a removable embroidered leather interior. AGV are offering the X3000 in three shell sizes (XS-MS, ML-LG, XL-2XL) to ensure a low profile fit for all head sizes, and the shell features ACF (Advanced Composite Fiber) fiberglass construction.

The visor is a high-strength unit with twin studs for securing it in the closed position, and it’a highly likely that AGV will offer both smoked and fully tinted visors for sale as aftermarket parts.

We’re expecting the X3000 to sell out as soon as it hits the shelves, but if you want to get in ahead of the crowd you can pre-order below.

Buy Here

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Preston Tucker’s Own Personal Tucker 48 https://silodrome.com/preston-tucker-48/ Sat, 02 Dec 2017 07:00:48 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=68596 Preston Tucker’s Own Personal Tucker 48

The Tucker 48 is unquestionably one of the most beloved American cars of all time. The story of its development, production, and downfall are the thing of legend – and it’s a story known by many thanks to the Francis Ford Coppola film Tucker: The Man and His Dream starring Jeff Bridges.

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Preston Tucker’s Own Personal Tucker 48

The History of the Remarkable Tucker 48

The Tucker 48 is unquestionably one of the most beloved American cars of all time. The story of its development, production, and downfall are the thing of legend – and it’s a story known by many thanks to the Francis Ford Coppola film Tucker: The Man and His Dream starring Jeff Bridges.

Preston Tucker named the car after the year it was built – 1948. Preston was a talented automobile designer who had partnered with Harry Miller in 1933 to build racing cars in Indianapolis, he later developed the Tucker Combat Car and the Tucker Gun Turret – the latter was a power-operated gun turret inside a Perspex bubble that would be used on PT boats, landing craft, B-17 and B-29 bombers throughout the Second World War and beyond.

In order to raise funds to get a car of his own design into production, Preston Tucker ran one of the first speculative IPO stock issues in American history – and raised $17,000,000. If anything, the plans for the Tucker 48 (originally known as the Tucker Torpedo) were too extravagant. Preston had engineers developing a bespoke 589 cubic inch (9.65 litre) flat-6 engine with fuel injection, hemispherical combustion chambers, and a fascinating overhead valve system that used oil pressure rather than a camshaft.

In the end, the huge flat-6 proved too complex and required a staggering 60 volts just to get started.

The team at Tucker began looking for a suitable replacement, and they settled on a production ready aircraft engine – an air-cooled flat-6 called the O-335, made by Air Cooled Motors. Not a man to do things by half, Preston bought the company and cancelled all of their aircraft engine orders so they could focus on creating a liquid-cooled version of the O-335 for use in the Tucker 48.

The biggest selling point of the 48 was the long list of safety features that had been designed into it from day one. A full perimeter frame was built around the cabin offering excellent protection from front, rear, and side impact incursion – an almost unprecedented design feature for a car in the 1940s. Preston also designed the dashboard to be padded and the steering column to be installed behind the front axle to protect the passengers, the windshield was also designed to pop out in case of an accident.

The most famous safety feature was the centrally mounted “cyclops” headlight, designed to follow the steering direction at turns of over 10 degrees to illuminate the around corners. Some states had laws on the books that banned cars with more than two headlights – so little caps were made to fit over the central light.

Production was stopped as a result of the contentious decision by the SEC to investigate the Tucker Corporation for fraud. The negative publicity killed any hope the company had for a future, even though the company was acquitted on all charges. In the years since some have suggested that one or more of the large automakers in the USA may have pulled strings to get the SEC investigation launched – but solid evidence has been elusive.

Preston Tucker’s Own Personal Tucker 48

The car you see here was Preston Tucker’s own daily driver, making it by far the most important of the surviving 48s.

The car is Tucker number 1029, it was originally used as one of the Tuckers that undertook high-speed tests at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and it was the star of the 1948 promotional film Tucker: The Man and the Car. After its PR responsibilities were completed, the car was adopted by Preston Tucker, who kept it and used it as a family car for seven years, appearing in the Tuckers’ home movies, and driven in Classic Car Club of America activities.

During the car’s time with the Tucker family it had been admired by Winthrop Rockefeller, and so when Preston decided to sell he contacted the member of the American dynasty (also a passionate car collector, and future Governor of Arkansas), who bought it immediately.

Over the intervening years the car would pass through a few more hands, including James Brown’s talent agent, before being supplied for the production of the film Tucker: The Man and His Dream.

In the years since the car has been reupholstered and repainted the original color, and it’s currently showing 19,199 miles which are believed to be original. It’s due to be offered for sale by RM Sotheby’s between the 18th and 19th of January with an estimated hammer price of $1,250,000 and $1,500,000 USD. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to view the listing.

All Images: Darin Schnabel © RM Sotheby’s 2017

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Twenty / 20 Helmet Art Exhibition https://silodrome.com/20-twenty-helmet-art-exhibition/ Fri, 01 Dec 2017 09:00:25 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=68630 Twenty / 20 Helmet Art Exhibition

A few months ago the team behind Sabotage Motorcycles, Giles and Andy, began developing a project to get 20 of the best artists in Australia to each take a motorcycle fuel tank and give it their own signature look. It quickly became apparent that finding 20 vintage fuel tanks in close to identical condition is...

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Twenty / 20 Helmet Art Exhibition

A few months ago the team behind Sabotage Motorcycles, Giles and Andy, began developing a project to get 20 of the best artists in Australia to each take a motorcycle fuel tank and give it their own signature look.

It quickly became apparent that finding 20 vintage fuel tanks in close to identical condition is close to impossible, but a conversation with the team behind DMD Helmets resulted in a pivot – and 20 brand new white DMD lids were shipped to Sydney for the project. Now instead of painting fuel tanks, the varied group of artists would be painting wearable motorcycle helmets.

After months of organizing the helmets are now all complete, and they’re each being offered for sale on eBay with 100% of the proceeds going to the Movember Foundation.

Official Twenty/20 Event Description

The team at Sabotage Motorcycles, in association with Art Pharmacy, have curated 20 DMD Helmets that have each been hand-painted by a hand-picked group of Sydney-based artists. With a truly wide range of styles, from renowned mural artists such as Scott Marsh, Sindy Sinn, Mike Watt, and Karen Farmer, to contemporary aboriginal artists Blak Douglas and Jason Wing, and the bold geometric styles of Nico, through to exceptional emerging talent such as Apeseven, Ingrid Wilson, Vincent Buret, Amy Roser, M-Lon, Skulk to name a few.

The opening night saw well over 400 people through the door with Young Henrys and Sailor Jerry providing refreshments.

If you want to own one of these wearable and truly one-off works, then now’s your chance. They are being auctioned right now through eBay – but be quick, the auction ends on 7th December. On top of that, 100% of the profits raised from the helmet auction will go to Movember Foundation, which funds research into men’s health and prostate cancer.

A huge amount of support has been given for this event, with DMD kindly providing the ‘blank canvas’ helmets, Smith Concepts have donated their time to clear-coat each one to ensure a shiny and durable finish, Vandal Sydney and Art Pharmacy for the space, and Throttle Roll for some great images of the night and also some of the artists working on the helmets in their studios.

VANDAL Gallery: 16-30 Vine St, Redfern NSW 2016 – Open Mon-Fri 10am-5pm

All eBay helmet listings can be seen here: bit.ly/twenty20art

⇞ Vincent Buret: Vincent Buret is a Sydney-based Furniture Designer focused on communicating ideas through form and material with simplicity and poetic expression. Vincent’s work nods to minimalist aesthetics, simplicity in shapes, new technologies and durability. With a Dual French/Australian nationality, Vincent has spent exactly 16 years in each country.

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⇞ Skulk: Skulk is a Sydney-based visual artist working across painting, drawing and muralism.
Expressive large-scale murals and playful characters have long-formed the basis of Skulk’s practice, but his more recent work shows an exciting development toward figurative abstraction, yet retaining a strong sense of style and authentic energy.

Skulk has held multiple Solo Exhibitions, in both Sydney and Berlin, and regularly participates in group shows at galleries such as Ambush, Kind-Of-Gallery, The Tate and No Vacancy Gallery. He was also named in the ‘Top 50 Australian Street Artists’ Exhibition at The Glasshouse, and exhibited at ‘OutPost Project’ on Cockatoo Island.

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⇞ Scott Marsh: Scott Marsh (b. 1984) is an Australian fine artist who picked up his first spray can at the age of 12 and begin tagging the streets of his Sydney neighbourhood. In his teens, his focus turned to train carriages. He embarked on several tours of railyards across the globe, forging a reputation as one of the most talented graffiti writers of his generation and taking the so-called Sydney-style to bold new levels.

In 2009, he completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in Painting, at the UNSW COFA (College of Fine Arts) and soon after began receiving commissions for large scale commercial murals.

His political murals, rendered on an enormous scale, have garnered world-wide attention, dealing with issues as diverse as liquor-licencing laws (Casino Mike, 2016), to environmentalism (Reef Killers, 2017) and Marriage Equality (Bride of Tony Abbott, 2017).

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⇞ Sindy Sinn: Sindy Sinn is a Sydney based illustrator, specialising in low-brow high-art. He is the Head Illustrator and Co-Founder of Snake Eyes Studio in Newtown. His artwork has branded countless bands, bars and beer, including The Rubens, Young Henry’s, Tropfest, Bauer Media, Universal Records, The Misfits, Peking Duk.

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⇞ Oodlies / Joi Murugavell: It’s hard not to be enchanted by the “oodlies” that crawl around on large paper squares, brought to life by Australian artist, Joi Murugavell. Her paintings are part abstract art — with large, blocked-out colorful shapes, and part Dr. Suess — with zany characters that all meet and interact. Joi creates a world where bizarre characters act out the nuanced interactions that we all face in our day-to-day life.

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⇞ Nico: Nico is a Sydney-based artist whose works can be found in public spaces and private collections all around the world. Nico’s works are vibrant, bold and highly decorative. Nico’s overall aesthetic is reflective of his background as a graphic designer, with a high level of importance being placed on traditional design elements and principals. Nico has created hundreds of street-based works throughout Australia, Europe and Asia in addition to regularly exhibiting and having work published internationally. Nico aims to bring positive change to the urban landscape and broader society through the creation and dissemination of uplifting artwork.

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⇞ Nev Sety: Nev Sety is a Sydney based stencil artist whose work can be seen on walls in Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra. Starting off with sticker art before moving onto paste ups, life-sized stencils and then large scale murals, his work has been constantly changing as he continues to push himself to face new challenges. Drawn to the therapeutic and meditative effects that the cutting and painting of stencils provides, Nev hopes to bring his viewers of his work along on his journey of learning and self-discovery.

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⇞ Mike Watt: Mike Watt is a Sydney based artist who uses a variety of mediums and methods to make his work, which normally consist of his distinctively gnarly characters. He draws inspiration from people he sees in the street and is fascinated with their weird details and quirks which he pushes into his work. He is also obsessed with pop culture and often creates his own version of existing characters. He’s been painting walls since the year 2000 and has been drawing for much longer.

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⇞ M-Lon: Miguel Gonzalez [AKA: M-Lon] from Caracas, Venezuela currently based in Sydney, Australia. Graduated in Architecture, self-taught in visual arts and illustration, mostly paints animals as metaphors of human behaviour inside society and issues that affect the people living in it. Has participated in murals, art for video-games, concept art for the TV industry; publications, and has been part of national and international collective and solo exhibitions. Co-founder and director of La Crème Creative and Kayapa Creative Studio on Sydney’s Northern Beaches.

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⇞ Lauren Webster: Lauren Webster is an artist based in Sydney whose work has been exhibited across Australia and Internationally. Webster is also known to work under the pseudonym Lauren and The Lost Boys. Lauren Webster’s artwork speaks of desert dreamscapes, heartache and highway adventures. Her language draws strongly on vintage sentiments and aesthetics while remaining distinctly her own.

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⇞ Kyle Smith: Kyle Smith is a world-renowned custom car and motorcycle painter who dapples in various mediums and techniques, including metal flake, pin-striping, vinyl and more. With artwork and vehicles featured in shows around the globe, he can boast specialising in painting anything from motorcycles, Hot Rods, and helmets, to skateboard art, and custom metal flake roof layouts.

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⇞ Karen Farmer: Karen Farmer is an internationally recognised artist based in Sydney who uses painting as a linchpin where her surfaces become as important as the imagery. At around five years of age she began using painting as a way of describing the world, which forged a path and became a lifelong journey to become an artist.

An award winning artist locally Farmer has also become a regular exhibitor in New York and LA with her work held in collections globally. Soon to release a book about her “Bad Magpies” her recent work seeks to reveal the nature of the activist avenger which she explores using a magpie motif.

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⇞ Ingrid Wilson: Ingrid Wilson (IIMWII) is a Sydney-based artist completing her Masters of Fine Art at UNSW Art & Design. Inspired by typography and cognitive science, IIMWII explores the process of manipulation, pushing figures or words beyond recognition. Exploring a range of mediums, her current practice is focused on abstract fluid painting and portrait illustration.

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⇞ Ginger Taylor: Ginger Taylor is a Sydney based artist, who started her creative career at age four drawing on paper tablecloths in restaurants. Later on she was always getting detention throughout her high school years for drawing on anything she could manage. These days you can find her painting murals throughout Sydney, customising bowling pins, motorbike helmets, moonshine jugs, painting watercolour portraits of people, and generally making everyday objects interesting and pretty. Her influences include – neon signs, country music, white trash and glitter.

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⇞ Kentaro Yoshida: Kentaro Yoshida was born and raised in Japan, and moved to Australia when he was age of 18. After a decade, now he is an illustrator / artist, currently based in Manly, Northern Beaches of Sydney in Australia.

He is passionate with both traditional and digital method of drawing. He has worked with various international brands for their campaign to individual for completely personalised private commission.

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⇞ Jason Wing: As an artist Jason Wing questions our understanding of history and of our current socio-political reality. Wing repurposes everyday objects and imagery, creating works that are both visually confronting and deceptively simple. Wing was recently selected in the Defying Empire: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Wing’s work is held in both private and public collections including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Artbank, Sydney; and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, Virginia, USA.

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⇞ Blak Douglas: Art career now spanning two decades. Hailing from western Sydney, born to a Koori Father/Caucasian Mother. B.A. in Graphic Design, majoring in illustration & photography, became self-practiced in painting with a style influenced by the study of Graphic Design and devoutly politicised per social justice. Widely collected.

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⇞ Apeseven: George Hambov aka Apeseven grew up in the 1980’s Sydney skateboard scene. Freehand aerosol and traditional brush techniques are evident with works primarily incorporating mixed media (acrylics, aerosol, inks, found paper and objects). His current works focus on complex bio-feedback driven loops involving a tapestry of pattern, animals and skeletal structures. His work is held in a number of private collections in the USA, UK, Japan, Australia and has exhibited in National Gallery of Victoria and Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago, USA).

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⇞ Amy Roser: Amy Roser is a Sydney based artist who hails from sunny Queensland. With a fascination for philosophy, art in place and weird things that people do, Roser channels her ever changing obsessions (currently including typography, the colour pink, Candy Chang, Alain de Botton, Jenny Holzer) and always flowers into her artwork. She works as the Art Pharmacy Consulting curator-in-residence, as well as the Vandal Gallery Manager.

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⇞ Simon Lovelace: Lovelace’s pop imagery is subversive and derisive and is reminiscent of 1970’s exploitation film in its use of manipulation and previously ‘innocent’ images and characters.

Simon Lovelace’s work balances intimacy with Kitsch. Alluding to a neo-pop expression, its success lies in the observer’s desire for a perverse moment, access to a reality they can only live through the artist’s personal studio time. His art allows a voyeurism often alluded to but restricted by others, genuine rude openness – refreshing.

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1953 Piaggio Ape Calessino https://silodrome.com/piaggio-ape/ Fri, 01 Dec 2017 07:00:45 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=67856 1953 Piaggio Ape Calessino

The Piaggio Ape was designed on the platform of the iconic Vespa scooter – “Vespa” meaning “wasp” in Italian, a reference to the side profile of the scooter with its bulbous rear, narrow waist, and handlebars that some say look like antenna. The Humble Vespa In many respects, the Vespa was to the post-WWII Italians...

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1953 Piaggio Ape Calessino

The Piaggio Ape was designed on the platform of the iconic Vespa scooter – “Vespa” meaning “wasp” in Italian, a reference to the side profile of the scooter with its bulbous rear, narrow waist, and handlebars that some say look like antenna.

The Humble Vespa

In many respects, the Vespa was to the post-WWII Italians what the Model T Ford was to the Americans of the 1900s and 1910s – it offered cheap transportation for the common folk, and it got the country moving.

The first Piaggio Vespa scooter appeared in 1944, with its characteristic front fairing, enclosed engine bay, and pressed-steel construction. In 1945 the aeronautical engineer Corradino D’Ascanio was hired by Piaggio to further develop the design, creating the scooter we all know today. D’Ascanio moved the engine to the rear mounting it off the side of the rear wheel, he installed a spare wheel on the other side, and removed the central tunnel resulting in a step-through design.

In the first year of sales, 1947, Piaggio sold 2,500 Vespas. By 1960 2 million had been sold, and by 1980 the number was over 10 million. The design has now become the de facto standard, widely copied throughout much of Asia, still providing the sole form of motorised transportation for many millions of families.

The Piaggio Ape

The Piaggio Ape was designed as a Vespa-based derivative that could be used by tradesmen, taxi drivers, delivery men, farmers, and anyone else in Italy who needed to carry people or goods.

“Ape” is Italian for “Bee”, a play on words given that it’s based on the Vespa. The front of the Ape is largely similar to its two-wheeled brother, however the rear has a solid axle with hydraulic brakes. The engine is mounted forward under the driver’s seat, and the rear section was designed to be as large as possible, to accommodate a wide variety of different body types and functions.

Vespa would eventually build the Ape in factories in Italy and India, where the basic shape and construction became a standard form of transportation for millions in much the same way the Vespa has. In fact, you’d be hard-pressed to visit any Asian country east of Iran and not spend some of your trip in (or on) a vehicle that owes its existence to either the Vespa or the Ape.

The 1953 Piaggio Ape Calessino Shown Here

The ’53 Ape Calessino you see here benefits from having the 150cc engine that began to be fitted as standard in 1952, it also has the upgraded cable operated gearchange.

There is seating for two behind the driver in a lightweight wooden body somewhat reminiscent of the Woodie Wagons that were popular in the USA at the same point in history. There’s a folding canvas top that offers good cover for both passengers but somewhat limited cover for the driver, who would be kept toasty warm in inclement weather by the air-cooled engine mounted between his or her legs.

This particular Ape is in excellent condition, clearly benefitting from a restoration relatively recently. It’s being offered by RM Sotheby’s at the New York Icons Auction due to be held on the 6th of December with an estimated value of between $50,000 and $80,000 USD, although there is no reserve on it. If you’d like to read more or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

Images: ©2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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