Custom – Silodrome https://silodrome.com Gasoline Culture Sun, 22 Jul 2018 08:59:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 18077751 The JM Customs BMW R80 RT Monolever Street Scrambler https://silodrome.com/bmw-r80-rt-monolever-motorcycle/ Fri, 13 Jul 2018 07:01:01 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=80930 The JM Customs BMW R80 RT Monolever Street Scrambler

BMW R80 RT Monolever The BMW R80 RT was released in 1982 as a road touring motorcycle fitted with the Paris-Dakar Rally winning BMW type 247 engine and drivetrain. From a road touring perspective, the BMW R80 RT was one of the best options in the world at the time. A version of the desert...

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The JM Customs BMW R80 RT Monolever Street Scrambler

BMW R80 RT Monolever

The BMW R80 RT was released in 1982 as a road touring motorcycle fitted with the Paris-Dakar Rally winning BMW type 247 engine and drivetrain.

From a road touring perspective, the BMW R80 RT was one of the best options in the world at the time. A version of the desert rally proven engine was fitted to a road-going frame, with road-specific suspension and brakes, and a wind tunnel developed aerodynamic fairing.

It might not have had the complexity and modernity of its Japanese rivals, but the model’s simplicity and hardiness have seen them outlive many (if not most) of their competitors. BMW built the R80 RT in two major versions, the twin shock model between 1982 and 1984, and the more famous “monolever” with a single-sided swingarm between 1985 and 1995.

The engines in the BMW type 247 series shared many parts, to the point that many of the smaller-capacity models have had barrel, piston, and head upgrades to boost power. When it comes to heritage, the type 247 is one of the icons of its age, and it’s become a favorite in recent years with custom motorcycle builders with an understanding of its history, and its historic significance.

BMW R80 RT Monolever

The JM Customs BMW R80 RT Monolever

The R80 RT you see here is the work of Scottish custom motorcycle garage JM Customs, run by the two man team of James Moir (lead designer) and Chris Burnett (lead mechanic). When not building customs, James and Chris are a cornerstone of the motorcycle scene in Perth, with a fully equipped service and repair centre, a paint booth, and a custom design and fabrication workshop.

This BMW R80 RT is the latest project from JM Customs, it’s a commissioned build for Jonny, a native of Belfast in Northern Ireland who’d come across their previous builds and contacted them to make him a bespoke street scrambler.

Once a suitable R80 donor bike was sourced and acquired, James and Chris set to work stripping it back to a bare frame before de-tabbbing it and fabricating a new subframe that would accommodate an LED tail light, and a discreet under seat electrical tray to hold a Motogadget M-Unit Blue and a battery. The seat pan was made in-house, then shipped out to Marcel Miller of Miller Custom Upholstery in Holland to have a black leather seat fitted.

BMW R80 RT Monolever Light

The engine was refurbished with rebuilt heads fitted with new exhaust port threads, and a new clutch kit was installed. Once the engine had been thoroughly cleaned it was repainted in black, then the outer edges of the fins were sanded back, this would be done to the alloy wheels as well to give the bike contrast between its darker and lighter elements.

Attention now turned to the fuel tank and fenders. The tank was in surprisingly good condition, so they decided to give it a brushed metal finish with a clear coat for protection, and finished it off with new badges and a gas cap from Old Iron Engineering in Germany.

A new front fender was sourced from a 1981 Kawasaki Z1000J and modified to fit, and the discrete rear fender was painted black to match the black and silver color scheme of the build.

The cockpit was fitted with a series of Motogadget parts including the digital speedometer, the mini switches, bar end mirrors, and bar end indicators. A twin Dominator-style headlight was installed behind a protective grill, with further protection in the shape of crash bars being fitted to protect the heads in the advent of an accident.

The bike was finished off with a pair of chunky Heidenau K60 Scout tires, and it’s now been delivered to its loving owner in Belfast. If you’d like to see more from JM Customs you can click here to visit their Facebook Page.

Follow JM Customs on Instagram

BMW R80 RT Monolever Handlebars

BMW R80 RT Monolever Engine

BMW R80 RT Monolever Engine 3

BMW R80 RT Monolever Engine

BMW R80 RT Monolever

BMW R80 RT Monolever

BMW R80 RT Monolever

BMW R80 RT Monolever

BMW R80 RT Monolever

JM Customs Perth Scotland

Images: Space 21 Photography

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The Fuel Motorcycles Coyote BMW R nineT Urban G/S https://silodrome.com/bmw-r-nine-t-urban-gs-custom/ Thu, 28 Jun 2018 08:01:30 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=79822 The Fuel Motorcycles Coyote BMW R nineT Urban G/S

The BMW R nineT Urban G/S The BMW R nineT Urban G/S is a member in the R nineT model range designed to evoke the spirit and styling of the iconic 1980 BMW R80 G/S – the motorcycle that launched the modern adventure bike genre and rocketed to icon status when it won the 1981...

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The Fuel Motorcycles Coyote BMW R nineT Urban G/S

The BMW R nineT Urban G/S

The BMW R nineT Urban G/S is a member in the R nineT model range designed to evoke the spirit and styling of the iconic 1980 BMW R80 G/S – the motorcycle that launched the modern adventure bike genre and rocketed to icon status when it won the 1981 Paris-Dakar Rally with Hubert Auriol in the saddle.

The Urban G/S you see here was re-worked by the Barcelona-based team at Fuel Motorcycles at the request of BMW Motorrad. While the factory-original bike does have moderate off-road ability (think fire roads and forest trails), the guys at Fuel wanted to up the ante, and create a modern dual sport bike with more pronounced off-road ability, and styling that wouldn’t look a whisker out of place on the start line of the 1981 Paris-Dakar.

From the factory, the R nineT Urban G/S comes with the standard flat-twin, producing 86 ft-lbs of torque at 6,000 rpm and 110 hp at 7,750 rpm. It has conventional forks, a monoshock rear, seat space for two, a small head light cowl, a twin front fender arrangement, an upright riding position, and a wet weight of 221 kilograms.

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

The Coyote BMW R nineT Urban G/S

Once Fuel Motorcycles took delivery of their Urban G/S they loaded it up on the hydraulic lift and took a good look at it. The goal was to lower weight and improve off-road ability, while sticking closely to the styling cues of the glory days of the original R80 GS.

It was decided that the original fuel tank and seat would need to go, and a new exhaust would be needed to get the pipes up out of the way – to ensure they didn’t bottom out on rocks and rough terrain. They also wanted scrambler-style braced handlebars, new “proper” mud fenders front and back, a bash plate under the sump, better suspension, a thicker seat, and a retro headlight with a protective grille.

The build started with a partial teardown, the team realized they would need to fabricate a new subframe above the engine to accommodate the new fuel seat and fuel tank. The original BMW fuel tank accommodates a fuel pump, so a new auxiliary tank was created to house the pump, and a Suzuki GT 250 tank was sourced, painted, and fitted, with a direct connection to the aux tank.

Great care was taken to keep a straight line from the bottom of the fuel tank along the bottom of the seat, the latter of which was made bespoke in the more traditional style with thicker foam and leather upholstery.

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

An aluminum sump guard was fitted and the team at Fuel created a bespoke pair of headers to curve the exhaust up and over the cylinders – keeping them out of harms way even if the bike is dropped on its side. Heat wrap was used on the pipes to save the riders legs should they touch it, and a pair of matching mini mufflers exit out past the rear tire.

The stock suspension on the R nineT G/S is perfectly capable, however it was decided to swap it out for higher-spec units including an Andreani adjustable hydraulic cartridge kit inside the front forks, and a new Öhlins monoshock in the rear.

A new headlight was sourced from a local enduro bike and paired with mini LED indicators front and back. A matching set of BMW head protectors were fitted, and a set of chromed fenders were installed front and back.

The engine breathes better now thanks to the elimination of the catalytic converter, the addition of the freer-flowing exhaust, and the use of K&N air filters. The spoked wheels were fitted with chunky Continental TKC 80 tires – capping off the newfound offload capabilities of one of BMW’s modern classics.

If you’d like to see more from Fuel Motorcycles you can click here.

Follow Fuel Motorcycles on FacebookInstagram

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS Engine

BMW R Nine T Urban GS Fuel Tank

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS Exhaust

BMW R Nine T Urban GS Seat

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

BMW R Nine T Urban GS

Images courtesy of Arnau Puig
Additional information courtesy of Bike EXIF

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The Bol d’Or by Walt Siegl Motorcycles – A Featherlight MV Agusta F3 https://silodrome.com/mv-agusta-bol-d-or-walt-siegl-motorcycles/ Thu, 21 Jun 2018 08:01:05 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=79034 The Bol d’Or by Walt Siegl Motorcycles – A Featherlight MV Agusta F3

Walt Siegl is deservedly known as one of the finest custom motorcycle builders in the world, but we’ve always associated him more with Ducatis than any other marque. The Bol d’Or is a step away from Ducati, but not a step away from Italy – it’s a comprehensively modified MV Agusta F3, and it’s no show...

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The Bol d’Or by Walt Siegl Motorcycles – A Featherlight MV Agusta F3

Walt Siegl is deservedly known as one of the finest custom motorcycle builders in the world, but we’ve always associated him more with Ducatis than any other marque. The Bol d’Or is a step away from Ducati, but not a step away from Italy – it’s a comprehensively modified MV Agusta F3, and it’s no show pony.

This is a bike designed specifically for the race track, and in its first outing at Barber Motorsports Park it took on a field of 47 modern superbikes and finished in the top 7 in each of the 4 races.

The Bol d’Or by Walt Siegl Motorcycles

The build for each of the MV Agusta-Based Bol d’Or customs has started the same way – with a strict eye for weight loss in search of every ounce that can be shaved for a performance gain.

Walt is an experienced motorcycle frame builder, he often creates lightweight chromoly frames for his Leggero series of custom Ducatis – so when he explains than the MV Agusta F3 frame is damn near perfect and shouldn’t be modified, I’m inclined to believe him.

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

The MV Agusta F3 was released in 2012 as a triple-cylinder sibling to the F4, the inline-3 cylinder engine is better balanced than a single or parallel twin, but it’s also narrower and lighter than an inline-4, making it an increasingly popular choice for manufacturers.

Once he’d decided to keep the frame in place, Walt set about figuring out where he could shed the most weight. He has a similar philosophy to Colin Chapman, that “adding lightness” is the single best performance modification one can make, as it not only improves acceleration and top speed, but also cornering speeds, braking performance, and it reduces loads on tires and suspension.

The original fairing, fuel tank, subframe, seat, rear cowl, exhaust, and fenders were all removed. Walt created a new lightweight subframe, and he began the painstaking process of shaving foam sections to map out the new bodywork. Once the basic shape was achieved he added automotive modeling clay to get the final curves and details precise to the millimeter.

Once the shape is complete they’re turned over to John Harvey at FuelCel who turns them into ultra-lightweight Kevlar composite panels. Once complete and sent back to Walt’s New England workshop, the final process of painting and fitment can begin. Final weight loss is somewhere in the order of 80 lbs (36 kgs) over the factory bike – a motorcycle that’s already one of the lightest in its class.

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

Walt’s attention now turned to the engine, he had integrated a pair of ram-air intakes into his new fairing, he chose to limit his modifications of the already beautifully designed engine to a new lightweight exhaust, ram-air intakes, and a new tunable performance program loaded into the ECU.

Once complete, the bike was placed into the hands of the man who had painted it, Robbie Nigl, who’s also a competitive motorcycle racer. He placed 7th in each of the 4 races he competed in, against contemporary superbikes being ridden by by people of no small talent.

Once testing was complete the Bol d’Or was handed over to Roman Graure, a personal friend of Walt’s a previous client who owns a Walt Siegl Leggero. It was decided to swap out the Paulo Rosas-designed race fairings for a more subtle (and also Paulo Rosas-designed) street fairing – Roman now has the race fairing displayed in his office as a modern art piece.

If you’d like to see more of Walt Siegl’s work or commission him to build you your own bike, you can click here to visit his official website, or you can follow him on social media below.

Follow Walt Siegl Motorcycles – InstagramInstagram

Walt Siegl

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

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MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

MV Agusta Bol D-Or Walt Siegl Motorcycles

All Images: Paulo Rosas

Additional information provided by Bike EXIF

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The Metalbike Garage Custom BMW K1200RS https://silodrome.com/custom-bmw-k1200rs/ Tue, 12 Jun 2018 07:01:53 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=78062 The Metalbike Garage Custom BMW K1200RS

The Metalbike Garage BMW K1200RS Metalbike Garage was founded by Simone Lecca after he left Gruppo Bertone – the storied Italian automotive styling, coachbuilding, and manufacturing company. Since Metalbike was founded 10 years ago, they’ve made a name for themselves via their signature aluminum bodywork – typically shaped using traditional tools and careful hand fettling....

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The Metalbike Garage Custom BMW K1200RS

The Metalbike Garage BMW K1200RS

Metalbike Garage was founded by Simone Lecca after he left Gruppo Bertone – the storied Italian automotive styling, coachbuilding, and manufacturing company.

Since Metalbike was founded 10 years ago, they’ve made a name for themselves via their signature aluminum bodywork – typically shaped using traditional tools and careful hand fettling.

The bike you see here is their latest build – it started life as a well-preserved BMW K1200RS, but its rebuild has been so significant that you’d have to look very carefully to decipher its origins.

Once the donor bike was rolled into the Metalbike Garage workshop a full teardown commenced, the plan was to see just how much of the bodywork could be removed, along with other superfluous parts, to reduce the weight of the 266 kilogram (586 lb) touring bike down to a more sporting level.

BMW K1200RS

Entirely new bodywork was then shaped from aluminum, with an interconnected fuel tank and seat base, the later of which sits on a new aluminum subframe. A new seat was then measured up and upholstered using cognac leather, following the downward curve from the fuel tank.

The underside of the fuel tank contours to accommodate a new fuel pump, and on the left side it has a cutaway section to allow space for the four air filter pods that feed down directly into the intake. All new instruments and lighting was sourced for the bike, with a strong focus on minimalism.

A new 4-into-1 exhaust manifold was fabricated in-house to make the most of the limited space available, it feeds back into a small muffler that exits on the lefthand side. A new set of handlebars were installed, with new grips and bar-end mirrors, and it was decided to keep the original (ample) brakes in place.

If you’d like to see more from Metalbike Garage you can visit their website here, or follow them on Facebook – or Instagram.

The BMW K1200RS

The BMW K1200RS was one of the most beloved long-range touring motorcycles of its time. That’s not to say it didn’t have its detractors, but period reviews are overwhelmingly positive and those who needed a premium tourer and could afford the sticker price of the K1200RS often had few other options.

As with all the K-series BMWs, the K1200RS was fitted with an inline multi-cylinder engine laid on its side, with the head on the left and the crank on the right. The engineers had chosen this layout as it significantly lowered the centre of gravity, and it left plenty of room up under the fuel tank for electrics, intakes, and other gubbins.

BMW K1200RS Rear Side

The sweeping aerodynamic bodywork of the K1200RS was characteristic of the 1990s, which should be no surprise given that it was originally released in 1997. The 1,171cc inline-4 is capable of a hearty 130 hp, and it sends power back to the rear wheel via a 6-speed gearbox and an enclosed driveshaft.

The engineers at BMW were arguably ahead of the curve on suspension design in the 1990s, and the K1200RS is a good example of this, with a monoshock rear-end and a telelever front – the latter of which often stops passersby in their tracks as they try to figure out how it all works.

Surviving examples of the BMW K1200RS are (fortunately) plentiful, and good examples can still be picked up for reasonable money. Despite the model’s growing age, it’s still an excellent touring motorcycle, and their owners are often reticent to sell them on.

BMW K1200RS Engine Intake

BMW K1200RS Front

BMW K1200RS

BMW K1200RS Body

BMW K1200RS Rear Side

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First Issue: Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine https://silodrome.com/bike-exif-craftrad-magazine/ Sat, 26 May 2018 04:00:42 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77534 First Issue: Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

The team at Bike EXIF have just released their first ever print addition in collaboration with the high-respected European publication Craftrad. Bike EXIF is a moto website that you’re almost certainly already familiar with, they’ve been running for 10 years, and in that time they’ve become a critical cornerstone of the global custom motorcycle world....

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First Issue: Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

The team at Bike EXIF have just released their first ever print addition in collaboration with the high-respected European publication Craftrad.

Bike EXIF is a moto website that you’re almost certainly already familiar with, they’ve been running for 10 years, and in that time they’ve become a critical cornerstone of the global custom motorcycle world. Getting your custom onto Bike EXIF is the two-wheeled equivalent of winning an Oscar – in the decade since founding the site Chris Hunter and his team have helped launch countless careers, and scores of custom motorcycle garages.

Issue #1 of the new magazine is 146 pages long, featuring never before seen customs, in-depth articles covering Husqvarna Vitpilen 701, the life and times of Walt Siegl, BMW choppers in 1970s Hamburg, columns written by Chris Hunter, Ola Stenegärd and Paul D’orléans, and much more.

You can buy the first issue now for £12.00 and shipping to the USA and Canada is £4.00.

Buy Here

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Han Solo

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

Bike EXIF x Craftrad Magazine

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The Slipstream Creations Retro Honda Enduro Chimera https://silodrome.com/retro-honda-enduro/ Wed, 23 May 2018 07:01:53 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77475 The Slipstream Creations Retro Honda Enduro Chimera

This article was written by James Fawcett, the founder of Slipstream Creations. When possible we like to bring you the story of a custom in the words of the builder, to give unique insight into their thought process and methods. This bike is a tribute to all those boxes of old parts and storage sheds full...

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The Slipstream Creations Retro Honda Enduro Chimera

This article was written by James Fawcett, the founder of Slipstream Creations. When possible we like to bring you the story of a custom in the words of the builder, to give unique insight into their thought process and methods.

This bike is a tribute to all those boxes of old parts and storage sheds full of discarded moto-ambition. Over the years I’ve accumulated plenty of extra parts, hanging on to them with the hope they’d come in handy someday. My 13-year-old son noticed the multiple Honda CB125S engines collecting dust, CL125 exhaust, an SL125 tank and fenders, and XR80 frame.

His imagination started putting the pieces together (figuratively), and then we decided to put the pieces together (literally). Our goal was to create a machine with vintage enduro styling, and a touch of Honda Grom attitude. The results are this super fun little SL/CL/CB/XR 125 thumper mashup.

While the general form factor of the parts from all these donor bikes made them seem like a decent match, actually fitting them together required a silly amount of custom fabrication and even more finesse. The XR80 frame was heavily customized to carry the CB125 engine. The rear subframe was custom made to bring the overall proportions of the bike to a more adult scale.

We lengthened an XR100 swingarm  to provide a slightly longer wheelbase, and to make room for 18” wheels and dual sport tires in the front and rear. An SL125 tank and front fender hint at some retro lines. A matching rear fender was hand made out of carbon fiber to flow with the custom subframe. A custom fabricated skid plate and front light plate round out the bodywork, along with a custom seat pan and upholstery.

Retro Honda Enduro

Next up was the electrical system, which we upgraded to 12 volts. LED brake lights were integrated into the subframe tubing, and dual off-road LEDs were added up front. The custom handlebar switch housings were cast out of epoxy and machined to accommodate the kill switch and independent controls of both front lights, with the wiring neatly routed through the handlebars.

The SL125 tank was mounted at a much more forward angle than the original design from the early 70’s. This helped the unique lines of the tank flow into the frame, but it also meant relocating the petcock to a much more forward position in order to draw fuel from the lowest point of the tank. The tri-tone red and orange paint adds another retro touch, mimicking the scallop design on many old Hondas of that era, and was laid out to accentuate the lines of the SL125.

The small tweaks and custom bits required to achieve a cohesive look are too numerous to mention, but we’re glad we did it. Everything on the build — from metal and carbon fiber fabrication, paint and powder coating, and even seat upholstery — was done in-house, with help and a little creative direction from my son Eddy. In the end, this bike is pure fun to ride. Give it a kick — it fires right up and sounds great. We couldn’t be happier with how it turned out. It won’t get you anywhere fast, but you’ll get there with a smile.

Here’s a short list of some of the things that were done to this bike:

– Modified tank and front fender from a Honda SL125
– Modified monoshock frame, with custom subframe and extended swingarm
– Custom fabricated electronics tray mounted under seat
– Custom fabricated seat pan and custom seat cover
– Hand made carbon fiber rear fender
– Custom skid plate and front light plate
– CL125 scrambler exhaust with stainless steel cone muffler
– 18” wheels with stainless steel spokes and dual sport tires
– 12v conversion with LED lighting and custom handlebar switch housings
– LED brake lights integrated into subframe tubing
– New piston and cylinder along with a top-end refresh
– Mikuni carburetor
– Custom designed and painted tank graphics
– All of the little, big details

If you’d like to see more work from Slipstream Creations you can click here to visit their website, and you can follow them on Instagram here or Facebook here.

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Slipstream Creations

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Honda Logo

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Retro Honda Enduro

Honda Enduro Tank

Retro Honda Gas Tank

Retro Honda Enduro Handlebars

Retro Honda Enduro Controls

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The dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution https://silodrome.com/honda-cb985f-evolution/ Mon, 21 May 2018 08:01:35 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77395 The dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

The Honda CB985F Evolution is a motorcycle that started life as a regular CB900F, before getting a comprehensive evolutionary rebuild at the hands of Darren Begg – a custom motorcycle builder who specializes in taking classics from the ’70s and ’80s, then rebuilding them using modern suspension, brakes, and technology. dB Customs dB Customs is...

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The dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

The Honda CB985F Evolution is a motorcycle that started life as a regular CB900F, before getting a comprehensive evolutionary rebuild at the hands of Darren Begg – a custom motorcycle builder who specializes in taking classics from the ’70s and ’80s, then rebuilding them using modern suspension, brakes, and technology.

dB Customs

dB Customs is based in Ottawa, Canada and run by Darren Begg. Darren is a friendly Welding Engineering Technologist and an experienced professional photographer, meaning he’s one of the few people out there who can build world class custom motorcycles and then photograph them himself for publication.

Earlier in his career Darren worked as an apprentice mechanic for a well known performance shop, often turning wrenches on their race winning drag racing cars, and learning a substantial amount about how to extract every available ounce of horsepower from four-stroke engines.

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

The Honda CB985F Evolution

The custom you see here is a build very close to Darren’s heart, it’s a tribute to the first custom he built – a bike that would lead to him forming dB Customs and doing it full time.

The customer who ordered this bike was enamored with the original and wanted to use the same paint scheme – but Darren wanted to do far more than just build another identical bike. Instead he worked out a list of improvements he could make, that would result in the completed bike being not only faster, but better handling and better at braking too.

Once the donor bike was stripped down the rebuilding process could begin, the frame was modified to suit a GSXR600 SRAD swingarm, and new custom shock mounts were welded into place. The team at Zanzani in Italy created a new set of triple trees for the bike, allowing Darren to fit modern Öhlins forks, which were matched with Öhlins shock absorbers in the rear.

The wheels are lightweight Oz Racing Gass series units in a gold anodized finish, Brembo brakes were fitted front and back, paired with 320mm full floating rotors up front, an RCS master cylinder and levers, with braided lines from Spiegler.

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

Perhaps the most important part of any performance custom is the engine – this one was rebuilt with a Wiseco 985cc forged piston kit, with a ported head, performance cams with Morse silent race cam chains, and 1100F rod bolts. The intake is delivered from a rack of four 36mm Yoshimura TMR-MJN carburetors, and it exits through a stainless steel 4-2-1 racing exhaust by JayGUI.

Once the engineering was done, the bike was sent off to Sketches Ink who painted it Nero Carbonio (base color) from a Maserati Grand Turismo. Impressively, the bike has no decals, everything is painted on by hand.

The completed CB985F weighs in at 82lbs lighter than the stock CB900F, tipping the scales at 443lbs with a weight distribution of 51% front and 49% rear. It turns out 105 hp at the rear wheel, and thanks to its new suspension and brakes, it handles better than the original by a notable margin.

If you’d like to see more from dB Customs you can visit their website here, alternatively you can follow them on Facebook here to stay up to date with their future projects.

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

dB Customs Honda CB985F Evolution

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Elemental Custom Cycles BMW R80 Monolever Cafe Racer Project 4 https://silodrome.com/cafe-racer-bmw-r80/ Mon, 14 May 2018 06:01:14 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77106 Elemental Custom Cycles BMW R80 Monolever Cafe Racer Project 4

The beautiful BMW cafe racer you see here is the work of Elemental Custom Cycles based in Neustadt, Germany just outside of Nuremberg. The core philosophy of the garage is “Life’s to short to ride boring motorcycles” – which sound like words to live by to me. This bike is the latest project from the German...

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Elemental Custom Cycles BMW R80 Monolever Cafe Racer Project 4

The beautiful BMW cafe racer you see here is the work of Elemental Custom Cycles based in Neustadt, Germany just outside of Nuremberg.

The core philosophy of the garage is “Life’s to short to ride boring motorcycles” – which sound like words to live by to me. This bike is the latest project from the German custom motorcycle garage, in true no-nonsense German style they named it “Project 4”.

Project 4 began when Andi, a new Elemental Custom Cycles client, rode 6 hours from Frankfurt to meet the team and discuss a cafe racer build. As luck would have it, they managed to find a BMW R80 for sale locally with just 7,000 kms on the clock while Andi was still in the shop.

The project outline called for a clean, minimalist BMW cafe racer that combined show bike looks, with real world rideability. This was no small task.

The build began with a full teardown and an inspection of all parts (you can scroll down to see a picture of the original bike before work began). It was decided that a new rear subframe would be needed so the team at ECC developed one and fabricated it, the rear of the fuel tank was then elevated slightly to follow the line of the seat base and rear cowl.

BMW R80 Monolever Cafe Racer

The frame was de-tabbed and the front end was lowered 50mm with a pair of Wielbers springs replacing the originals inside the fork tubes. A new adjustable rear monoshock was sourced from YSS, and a pair of Brembo brake rotors replaced the factory units up front.

One of the most challenging aspects of the build was the spoked wheels – it proved remarkably difficult to match hubs, spokes, and rims – giving Andi the 17″ wheels front and back that he wanted, with a 120mm tire upfront and a 150mm unit in the rear.

The eye-catching paintwork on the bike required over 40 drafts before the final design was settled on – the base layer is an Audi Daytona grey metallic with teal accents and 7 layers of clear coat to make it gleam. The final detail was the unique exhaust, the team at ECC couldn’t find an off-the-shelf unit that suited their needs, so they created one in-house, with a bespoke stainless steel muffler under the engine.

The completed bike is fully road legal, it passed the stringent German TÜV regulations and now carries full road registration – a rare thing in the country, with many customs needing to be trailered to shows.

If you’d like to see more from Elemental Custom Cycles you can click here to visit their website, you can also scroll down to read more about the BMW R80 Monolever.

BMW R80 Monolever

The BMW R80 Monolever

The R80 Monolever was built from 1982 to 1995 and enjoyed solid sales numbers, it was powered by a more-reliable-than-taxes 797.5cc boxer twin producing 49hp and 59Nm of torque. BMW built over 22,000 Monolevers during the life of the model, this means that they’re relatively easy to come by in many parts of the world and as they become a little older and a little less expensive we’re seeing a slow increase in the number of custom motorcycle garages that are taking them on as project bikes.

The “T” in “RT” stands for “Touring”, these models had a signifiant fairing added for highway and autobahn cruising at sustained speeds in excess of 100 mph. Many were fitted with hard pannier cases that made them ideal for long distance touring, a role they fulfilled in Germany, across Europe and further afield.

Although it isn’t known how many of the original 22,000 Monolevers have survived to the modern day, I’m willing to bet that the majority of them have survived in some way or other. The bulletproof boxer twin engine, reliable 5-speed transmission, and shaft drive are all renowned for their toughness, rivalling the best of the Japanese bikes for reliability.

Cafe Racer Headlight

BMW R80 Monolever Shock

Cafe Racer Seat

Cafe Racer Clip On Handlebars

BMW R80 Monolever Parking Garage

BMW R80 Monolever Rear

BMW R80 Monolever Tire

BMW R80 Monolever Custom Before and After

Photos by Christian Motzek Photography

The post Elemental Custom Cycles BMW R80 Monolever Cafe Racer Project 4 appeared first on Silodrome.

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Valespeed Motorcycles – 28 Days Later Custom GasGas https://silodrome.com/valespeed-motorcycles-28-days-later-custom-gasgas/ Fri, 11 May 2018 06:01:56 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=77144 Valespeed Motorcycles – 28 Days Later Custom GasGas

Valespeed Motorcycles 28 Days Later is a custom GasGas built by Valespeed Motorcycles, a one-man operation run by a friendly Brit named Ben who’s based out of Worcestershire in the UK. Ben’s last build was a land speed racing motorcycle that set three class records at the Pendine Sands in South Wales in 2016 –...

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Valespeed Motorcycles – 28 Days Later Custom GasGas

Valespeed Motorcycles

28 Days Later is a custom GasGas built by Valespeed Motorcycles, a one-man operation run by a friendly Brit named Ben who’s based out of Worcestershire in the UK.

Ben’s last build was a land speed racing motorcycle that set three class records at the Pendine Sands in South Wales in 2016 – so he clearly knows what he’s doing.

With 28 Days Later he wanted to go in a different direction and build a fun motorcycle, it may not be about to set any land speed records, but it does look like it’d be a hugely entertaining bike to ride.

28 Days Later – A Custom GasGas

The project outline called for a custom motorcycle that Ben could display at the Bulldog Bash – an annual motorcycle rally attended by well over 50,000 people each year. It’s held in August at the Shakespeare County Raceway, situated just outside Stratford-upon-Avon in England (the birthplace of William Shakespeare).

It was decided to use an old 270cc GasGas single-cylinder engine that Ben had laying around the garage as a spare in case the engine in his trials bike ever suffered an unplanned, spontaneous internal disassembly. The GasGas engine is a mechanically simple two-stroke unit, with a single cylinder, a single carburetor, and liquid-cooling.

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Looking around the garage, Ben also managed to find a pair of Triumph wheels from a previous project, a Huntley & Palmers biscuit tin, some tennis racket tape for the grips, and an old champagne cork for the gas tank cap.

The biggest single piece that was required for the build was the frame – Ben built it himself from 3/4″ steel tubing using a home-brew roller in his workshop. This bespoke frame uses the GasGas engine as a stressed member, and it encloses the fuel tank between the upper and lower backbone tubes, an interesting modern take on the fuel tank mounting method used by many motorcycles in the early 20th century, including many board track racers.

Once the engine was fitted, Ben fabricated an exhaust that curved up around the left side and exits under the rear if the tank into a single muffler. There’s a small radiator mounted upfront, and a small single seat installed in the rear.

Interestingly, the rear brake is installed at the leading edge of the rear sprocket, it’s a cable operated unit that was sourced from an Italian moped. The opposite side of the rear wheel features a brake light and a numberplate mounts, and just in front of the rear wheel lies that Huntley & Palmers biscuit tin – Ben used it to hide all of the electrics.

The completed bike is a masterclass in simplicity and style, there’s nothing on it that isn’t functional, and its board tracker inspired looks will win it admirers across the UK and around the world.

If you’d like to see more of Ben’s work at Valespeed Motorcycles you can click here to visit the website. He does take on customer builds to pay the rent, so if you’re looking for a unique bike builder, Ben might just be your guy.

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

GasGas Engine

Fuel Tank

Motorcycle Radiator

Custom Gas Tank

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Wrapped Exhaust

Handlebars

Custom Fuel Tank

GasGas Engine

Motorcycle Rear Wheel

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Biscuit Tin

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

Custom GasGas Motorcycle

The post Valespeed Motorcycles – 28 Days Later Custom GasGas appeared first on Silodrome.

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The Cytech Motorcycles BMW R80/7 Cohiba Bobber https://silodrome.com/bmw-r80-7-bobber/ Sat, 05 May 2018 04:01:24 +0000 https://silodrome.com/?p=76802 The Cytech Motorcycles BMW R80/7 Cohiba Bobber

Cytech Motorcycles have been organizing African motorcycle expeditions since the mid-1970s, they’ve only ever used BMWs because of their legendary toughness and reliability, and over the decades they became one of the largest BMW dealerships in Southern Africa. The company is largely a family affair, Donovan does much of the hands on work with his...

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The Cytech Motorcycles BMW R80/7 Cohiba Bobber

Cytech Motorcycles have been organizing African motorcycle expeditions since the mid-1970s, they’ve only ever used BMWs because of their legendary toughness and reliability, and over the decades they became one of the largest BMW dealerships in Southern Africa.

The company is largely a family affair, Donovan does much of the hands on work with his team – namely Andrew, Johannes, and Samuel. Administration and orders are handled by his sister Kerry, and his mother Gina runs the finance division.

While the company runs its successful tour business, dealership, motorcycle rental service, and parts sales services after hours they have fun by building unusual custom BMW motorcycles for clients around the world, and of course, in their native South Africa.

We’ve previously featured one of their builds here on Silodrome, a beautifully built BMW R45 that they rebuilt to scrambler/adventure specification.

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

The BMW R80/7 Cohiba Bobber

The new BMW R80/7 Cohiba Bobber you see here is an altogether different bike, built for friends Eduan and Henk. The two men had previously ordered the Martini-inspired BMW from Cytech, and while building a holiday resort on an island more recently, they settled on the idea of building a Cohiba-inspired build.

Once Donovan had received the brief from Eduan and Henk he set to work finding a suitable BMW to use as a starting point. He knew that when the motorcycle was completed, it needed to look like it was cruising the streets of Havana with the iconic vintage cars and motorcycles Cuba is famed for.

A BMW R80/7 popped up for sale locally after a few weeks – so Donovan bought it and rolled it into the Cytech headquarters so work could begin. It was clear from the outset that the new bike was going to be a ’50s style bobber – a cafe racer or scrambler wouldn’t really suit the muse.

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

The first order of business was a full teardown, the original 800cc engine was dismantled along with the gearbox, and both were rebuilt after sandblasting. The front forks were lowered by 50mm by machining down the fork stanchions, and the rear shocks were modified with new heavy duty springs and fitted to new upper brackets to lean them forward.

A pair of new bobbed fenders were installed over Dunlop whitewall tires, and a single seat pan was fabricated, then upholstered in tan leather, along with the new leather tank strap designed to hold two Cohibas just above a small pocket that holds a cigar cutter and lighter.

Perhaps the most immediately noticeable part of the build is the Cohiba fuel tank – it was painted by Ryan and his team over at Custom Creations using the iconic pattern and logo from the Cuban company’s cigar bands.

The completed bike is one of the most well-executed BMW bobbers we’ve seen in recent memory, made all the more remarkable by the fact that it comes from Africa – one of the least represented continents in the world of custom motorcycle building.

If you’d like to see more from Cytech Motorcycles you can click here to visit their website.

Cohiba Cuban Cigars

Cohiba Cigars

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle Cohiba Tank

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle Back

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle Seat

BMW R80/7 Engine

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

BMW R80/7 Motorcycle

Images courtesy of Johan and Wilma Steyn from Amber Sky Creations

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